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29

The oil is most likely being burned by the engine. You should change your oil more often, it's not just new oil you are putting in, when you change your oil, it takes the old oil and contaminates suspended in that oil out. So by added 2 new quarts every so often is not nearly the same as changing the oil. Also I would recommend checking the oil level on a ...


8

Personally I wouldn't be all that concerned unless the oil leak was large. One simple check for the state of health of the engine would be to take the car to an independent mechanic and have a compression test done. It won't catch everything that could be wrong with the engine, but if the compression test comes out OK, it can provide you a bit more peace ...


7

Oil has a couple of places it can go. The ground The radiator The tail pipe It could be a leak that only happens under pressure (IE the engine running) but for that amount the underside of the car would be covered in oil and should be very obvious by looking under the car with a flashlight. If it's going out the tail pipe you would see obvious blue ...


6

The oil is going somewhere. If your vehicle is not marking its territory (leaking when parked), it's probably burning it.


5

An oil leak from the drain plug can be fixed for a few cents - it will just need a new crush washer on the plug (somthing that ought to be replaced every time the oil is changed, but rarely is). If it is leaking from between the transmission and the engine you've got a bigger problem, and one I would get fixed regardless of the fact it makes a mess, as ...


5

Valve covers are a popular leak spot, across all vehicle makes and models.


5

Even if there is a "common area" of oil leaks it wouldn't make sense to change a part based on the most common failure. You need to find out where you car is leaking so you don't make a needless repair that could easily cost you hundreds of dollars. I would get a second estimate on locating the oil leak. Dye tests don't cost hundreds of dollars. The "Dye ...


5

Certain Toyota engines are notorious for valve stem seal leaks starting at right around 60k miles. It's exacerbated by using synthetic oil. I put 180k miles on a 5S-FE engine that had that problem all the way from 55k miles. Just had to top off the oil periodically. The Toyota mechs I know all say it's not worth the money to fix, just monitor the oil ...


5

I drive 2 1984 Topaz's and one 1985 Topaz daily. The part in your photo is actually the electric vacuum pump. It supplies the vacuum for the brake booster, cruise control, and the injection pump timing. Unplugging it was the cause of the smoke. The IP has a built in cold start mechanism that uses the vacuum to adjust the injection pump timing depending on ...


5

I take it the car is front wheel drive, being a 90s Toyota? If it is only leaking when parked facing uphill, then (logically) the leak must be to the rear of the engine. I would suggest that the driveshaft oil seals (where the shafts leave the gearbox) is a likely suspect. Where is the oil filter mounted? The seals around them can often be suspect. ...


5

Your oil pan gasket is probably leaking on one side. when you're on an incline, the oil is pooling on that side of the oil pan and subsequently leaking out.


5

It is entirely possible. Here is one of many videos on YouTube. Unfortunately, it is impossible to predict how much time or warning you will have before a car fire can occur. If you don't have the money to fix it now you should at least make certain that oil isn't allowed to drip directly onto the exhaust. I know the video may seem like the extreme ...


4

Gasket sealant is always good, but not necessary. Sealants are different, so ask the guy at your local auto parts store for sealant for the valve cover gasket. The difficulty levels vary with this, however. For example, I have an older Nissan Hardbody truck with leaking valve cover gaskets. The new gaskets are cheap enough, but removing the valve covers ...


4

I observed this same situation in my 1997 Integra back in the day. If you look at the summary on Wikipedia, you can see why the oil pressure is critical to VTEC: At the switch point a solenoid is actuated which allows oil pressure from a spool valve to operate a locking pin which binds the high RPM cam follower to the low RPM ones. So, without ...


4

I think the likely suspect here is engine oil. If your head gasket is blown it is not unusual for oil to get into the coolant or the other way around. Coolant is being circulated through the engine very close to where oil is being circulated through the engine. Consider doing a compression test and/or a leak down test.


3

The 3.8 Natural Aspirated Engine was a rather solid design and were rarely known to blow head gaskets. Their weak point seemed to be the plastic Intake Manifold. Here are the three possible causes to your issue. If you are 100% sure that it's oil in the coolant then remove the intake manifold and check the Intake Manifold Gaskets upper and lower for any ...


3

Looks like oil - simplest place to start is to get the front jacked up, ideally on axle stands or a ramp to make it as safe as possible. Get a good maintenance lamp and just start looking for oil - the shine gives it away, even amongst the dirt you get on the underside of the engine. Check the drain valve for the oil pan/sump, and look for drips down the ...


3

Whether you stick with synthetic or switch back to traditional oil, if it is your valve seals (which does seem likely) you will still need to get them replaced. Quite often that is all you will need to replace - but worth getting your garage to have a look at head gasket at the same time as they will be in there anyway.


3

What you have is the very same issue many Ford Escape owner's have: A leaking timing chain cover. My 2003 V6 is in the same boat. This is a small and somewhat annoying leak due to the fact it drips onto the exhaust and causes that oil burning smell and sometimes visible smoke coming from the right front side of the car. What I hate the most is shutting of ...


3

Charge the battery. It will be totally dead, unless you have it on a trickle charger. You may need to buy a new one if the current one doesn't hold a charge well, but this will at least allow you to start the car. While the battery is charging, check all fluids. Coolant, transmission fluid, brake fluid, and even the windshield washer fluid (while you're ...


3

You can do this for full size engines so I don't see why you couldn't do it with a motorcycle. As long as you have access to the crankshaft. 1) Use a seal puller 2) Find a big socket or piece of pipe to put over the new seal to press it in. 3) Put oil on seal/shaft before re installing pulley/sprocket back over crankshaft. Video on a car here


3

I would be satisfied with the repair. I would push for some free service, maybe a couple of free oil changes. Demand a refund for the service you paid for when the damage was discovered I would also demand a letter accepting blame and a promise to replace the oil pan for free if you find the repair unacceptable at a later date due to stripped threads or ...


3

Indeed, an oil leak in a hot area is a car fire waiting to happen. Example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Fiero#Engine_fire_reputation "...oil to escape and come into contact with engine parts. The oil would catch fire when it contacted the exhaust manifold or hot exhaust components..."


3

Was the factory solution not using a gasket? A gasket is usually better than the Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) sealing method since RTV is really messy and hard to clean off during maintenance and is harder to apply which may lead to failure as you have seen. There should be no need to warranty the gasket. If it becomes an issue again it should still ...


3

Flush the radiator. Some of the red coolants, especially if they used dexcool will look like that normally. If you've got oil, or transmission fluid going into the coolant you will likely have coolant going into the oil or transmission fluid, so check those fluids closely for contamination. Once you've done that, monitor the coolant closely and see if the ...


3

If oil drips on a pulley or a belt then the rotation of those objects could sling the oil everywhere, even as high as the bottom of the hood. Most likely an oil leak would have to be above these components and a good guess would be through something like a failed valve cover gasket. Another possibility is that it is leaking near the front of the car ...


3

The only scenarios that comes to mind is lots of short trips where the oilpan and oil never got really hot. Then 35 days later a long trip gets it really warm and the plug gets loose and falls out. The second is a defective crankcase ventilator along with a damaged plug "O" ring that eventually blows out resulting in a loose drain plug. Both scenarios would ...


3

To answer your questions, if there is a real leak, then yes, there is a problem. The oil will cause the belt to deteriorate and possibly slip. When it does, it is catastrophic. Pistons slam against valves and the head is toast (in most cases). This does happen suddenly. Get a different shop to look at it. If the belt appears dry, I would bet there isn't an ...


2

This would depend on the type of car you have. The majority of valve covers i've come across are aluminum. You can try some RTV sealant or Hondabond sealant (pretty popular solution for this) in place of a valve cover gasket. The sealant should mold itself around all the gaps and irregularities in your valve cover, making for a better seal. If that ...


2

Somewhere there will be a Ford spec for how much oil the engine is allowed to consume between oil changes. I wouldn't be surprised if it's shockingly high. Check your owner's manual for starters. If the oil level as measured by the dipstick never gets lower than the low end of the 'acceptable' range between oil changes, it's probably OK to leave it alone. ...



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