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Here's an article on ToyoNation explaining what you need to do: Link Generally, removing the bolts you don't need a sequence. When torquing them back up, you want to do them up in a diagonal star pattern, as you would with your wheel lugs etc. This guide recommends using a toyota sealant, which is probably about right. Any RTV sealant that's at the right ...


1

Here are the instructions per your owners manual. If all else fails, go back to the manual ... you can almost never go wrong by doing so, especially if you still have warranty left on your vehicle. NOTE: I'll throw some descriptive stuff in along the way to clarify things a little. What @rviertel has written is fairly good, but I have some contention with a ...


3

It looks like you got most of the steps there but not all in the right order. Allow car to cool sufficiently so that the oil is not hot. This will make the rest of the job easier. Drive car onto low profile ramps and then block the rear tires so that it does not roll back. Put the car in park or in gear and apply the parking brake. Turn the car off. If you ...


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15w50 you can use for Apache rtr 160. It's recommended and bike is very smooth with it.


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This sounds like the kickstand safety switch has gone astray. Almost like the switch gets stuck and the bike thinks the kickstand is still down when its not. After 'wobbling' the bike, the switch gets unstuck?


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The spec for a 2009 Honda Accord is plain old oil; no specific need for synthetic. As long as you get your oil changed regularly, it won't be breaking down to the point where the difference is measurable (except in your wallet). You won't have any problems switching between synthetic and non-synthetic.


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No, you can go back to regular oil next oil change. Its only bad to go back to non-synthetic if the car has been on a steady diet of Synthetic for a long time or is designed to use synthetic oil.


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After a lot of searching - I've found that nowhere in the manuals of warranty the engine oil grade is mentioned, i've also looked thru several forums where 10w40 to 20w40 grade of oil is recommended for TVS APACHE RTR 160 bikes by expert bikers and mechanics alike. Having used a TVS APACHE RTR 150 older model of a friend, he also used 10w40 for his, so i ...


0

Methinks this sounds like a hydraulicked engine, boys... mechanic time! Ouch. Expensive learning experience. Too much oil in the crankcase can cause piston and conrod damage, ruptured oil seals and all sorts of of other mischief.


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Actually, drive about for a bit. This flushes all the oil through the system and sometimes this will drop the level back to where it should be. If 'not much oil comes out the bottom' I'd guess you have an air bubble preventing proper draining. A short drive or a minute or two's idling will clear that out. Running a Subaru slightly over full is cheap ...


5

You can drain some oil by just pulling the plug again, then replacing it rather quickly. Take out the amount you think you'll need. It's going to make a bit of a mess, so wear nitrile gloves and eye protection. As far as the filter goes, there are two things you can do without the tool. First, get an old leather belt. I'm talking the kind which is well ...


3

I wouldn't spend any more money replacing oil until you have got the engine running again. Take the plugs out and check if they are covered in oil. Make a note of which plug came out of which cylinder so you know which cylinder had the oily plug if there is one. With all the plugs out, turn the engine over with the starter to blow any oil out of the ...


3

I didn't see in your question where you refilled the ATF for the transmission. It's possible at least part of the grumbling you heard was the transmission complaining about being about 1/3 to 1/2 low on fluid. Be sure the use the right fluid as shown in your owners or repair manual for the car. Fill it back to the cold mark on the stick. I think an '05 Chevy ...



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