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2

Usually when changing the oil you won't be able to fully drain the old oil anyways and the old and new oils will mix, like it or not. Usually this is not a problem even if the weights are different, though it's safer to stick with the same brand, as some argue the components in the oil being incompatible may cause issues. What you should be wary of is ...


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Mixing new with the old will cause you absolutely no issues. As long as you are using the same weight oil, it will mix up and you'd never know it. Continue to change your oil at the specified interval and you should be golden.


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In my experience it is completely possible since powerful BMW engines consume a lot of engine oil. I have a 2014 X5 50i (4.4 L V8) and every 2000 miles or so I need to add 2 quarts of oil. Dealer told me about this before hand so you shouldn't worry about it. Even they have told me that M series cars require oil top-up every 1000 miles or so. This is due to ...


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According to the owner's manual, it depends on the climate you live in: +----------------------------------+------------------------------------+ | Climate | Oil Grade | +----------------------------------+------------------------------------+ | Hot (ABOVE 32°F OR 0°C) | SAE 20W-40, SAE 20W-50 ...


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That seems like an unlikely scenario. You could try applying pressure against it if you can fit a screwdriver between the pan and plug while loosening.


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There is a popular process to get just about all the oil and sludge out of an engine. Though it is usually done after engine disassembly. You soak the dirty engine pieces into a hot tank of sodium hydroxide (lye) solution and other cleaning agents. The liquid will chemically react with the oils in the engine and remove it in the process.


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Probably normal for a car. Coming from the motorcycle world this sounds perfectly normal as motorcycles are even more extreme, most requiring the first oil change after 600 or 1000 miles and some even being filled with a special* running in oil at the factory to accelerate the running in process. Running in will generate a lot of little metal particles (as ...


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The real answer is- it depends. An extra couple of quarts? Probably no real effect. If you put in enough that the crank is sloshing the oil around, you probably will get a foam of oil all around the underside of the pistons, but besides robbing a bunch of horsepower due to windage and maybe causing some oil burning issues (at a certain point your oil rings ...


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It's not good. The little oil you have left will overheat & degrade as others have explained better. With your oil level really low like that, as long as the engine isn't overheating yet, you might be able to get the car to lug itself 5 or 10 miles to a shop to get more oil w/out problems, but it's already really pretty harsh on the car Basically, your ...


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With way too much engine oil in the engine, the problem is that the crankshaft can hit the oil in the bottom of the crankcase when the engine is running. Since the crankshaft is spinning fast, even at idle, each time it slaps the surface of the oil, it will create some bubbles in the oil as the air just behind the spinning crankshaft lobe gets dragged under ...


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If an engine is that full, it will pump oil through the PCV system into the intake manifold. Piston rings, even in a fresh engine, always have at least a minimal amount of blow-by from combustion. Normally these combustion products pressurize the crankcase slightly and then vent through the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system into the intake. ...


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Without oil to lubricate, metal on metal surfaces begin to heat up from friction. The extra heat causes the metal to expand. When it expands enough, some part of the engine will try to stop moving, but the other parts may not stop yet because of momentum or power, causing bends and breaks of internal engine parts. When oil is too low, the oil pump might ...


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I can answer this because it has happened to me a few times. There are several different possibilities depending on the ambient temperature and how old the engine is. Here are three real scenarios that have happened with my 1996 Volvo 850: (1) When the oil gets low the first thing you might notice is more noise. Oil muffles the engine, so when oil gets low ...



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