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0

use a long extension bar on your ratchet and stay far away from the oil coming out, then clean the socket, plug and surrounding area with a rag of your choice.


1

Although not a direct answer to the OP's question, a piece of advice picked up from my many trade customers: In the new Ford Ranger with 3.2 L Duratorq TDCi ("PUMA" P5AT) diesel engine, draining all the oil out can cause engine failure because the oil pump is not self priming and the oil must be drained and topped in quick succession. No sloping off for a ...


0

When reading the oil level stick just take the lowest reading. Obviously if the oil stick is dry above F (even if only part of it) then the oil level is at least up to the F mark. The explanation for the amount above F is as you assume, just picking up from inside the oil level tube. Cant help with the oil change though.. You may have to assume the oil ...


1

You are worrying too much, everything is fine and your car is very happy. If you have too high oil level, it can struggle with breathing, but it won't harm your engine, just drain it to level and happy days. Foamed oil will disappear after a longer jorney when your oil will heat up properly. If it is too low, it will heat up faster, will decrease oil ...


1

if your oil is now at the correct level and the engine is not upset, then you may not have any problem. the starter behavior will be unrelated unless you have inadvertently, say, soaked it in oil.


1

This is strictly theoretical (aka I could be completely wrong), but if an engine is literally filled to the brim as you described, very little damage would occur. Depending on the type of engine, once the starter is engaged the volume of the crankcase will remain fairly constant, as the volume lost by one piston moving down will be negated by another ...


1

If your TDI is a PD type then you're better off erring on the short/fast side. There were many cases of prematurely worn out cams on PDs due to oil. This means sticking to the oil norm and change interval specified by VW. If the engine is a non-PD TDI (such as ALH, AFN etc.) then you could try using oil analyzer (such as lubricheck) in order to determine ...


6

No problem doing it cold, but better to do it hot so the oil flows easier. Proper tools will help, and so will experience. I've been burned a lot too, but that's because I'm not very adept, and have worked in "quick lube" environments where the customer is in the waiting room after coming off the highway, and I did not have the luxury of any cool-down time....


2

When I change oil, I use to run the engine warm enough, but never "untouchable hot". Never to operating temperature, that's what? 180F degrees? I let it get some temperature I can deal with. Then let it drain down all the time it takes. I usually uncap the breather and remove the stick gauge to speed up the process. The oil comes out warm but not enough to ...


0

Mixing old with new won't hurt anything. If your engine is consuming too much oil, for instance, you would need to add new oil more frequently because you need the right oil level all the time. I have got cars that needed as much as 1L of new oil every 1 or 2 weeks because the oil piston rings where kaput. Nothing happened except $ going down there as ...


4

Think of a cup with sediment (dirt, sand). If you shake it up real good, then dump it out, you will get most everything out. If you let it sit overnight, the dirt and sand settle to the bottom. When you go to dump it out, you dump mostly water, and most of the sediment is still at the bottom of the cup. Your oil is similar with the gunk you are trying to ...


13

The benefits of changing it hot are the that oil is less viscous, so it flows better, allowing more of the old oil to drain. It will also drain more quickly. I know when I do mine, I let the engine warm up, but not to full operating temperature. Even through latex gloves, full temp oil would burn my hand, and I can do with that. And getting it at least ...


1

For what it might be worth, we have a pair of Jetta Mk4 TDIs one with the ALH engine, the other with a BEW. Both are well over 200,000 miles (the ALH is pushing 300,000) and for the most part we do our own maintenance, using a local shop for thorny diagnostic issues and when specialized tools or a lift are required. Over about 200,000 miles the ALH has run ...


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There is a conflict with manufacturers recommending oils in that some car mfgrs are required by govt to meet certain mileage averages and they know that thinner oils provide less friction and slightly greater mileage. They also know that thinner oils wear out metals faster and your car will wear out faster with the thinner oils. The car mfgs only care ...



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