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29

You haven't wrecked the car but you should get the oil down to the appropriate level. If the oil isn't hot, almost any sort of plastic tubing can be used for siphoning. It's easiest to go in via the dip stick. Remember not to use the "suck start" siphoning method as you don't want a mouthful of oil. If you have a long enough piece of tubing, you can ...


17

Find another way to keep track of your oil changes. For example: put that window sticker in your glove box instead if your driving patterns are consistent, figure out how long it will take you to drive 3000 miles and put a reminder in a Google Calendar. put a notebook and pen in the glove box. When you change the oil, write it down, with date and mileage. ...


16

Look in your owner's manual for the vehicle. It should have a good recommendation on the grade and whether synthetic oil is required. In fact some vehicle mfg. will recommend a brand because that brand meets certain requirements.


10

Many things can (and most certainly will) happen: Engine seizure, pistons stuck in cilinders, broken crankshaft, broken conrods (causing holes in the engine block), damaged camshafts, worn out bearings, etc. So, always use the appropriate oil if you care about your car.


10

I would not start an engine that has the oil overfilled by a gallon. You can cause permanent engine damage by significantly overfilling the engine with oil. If the crankshaft and connecting rods are contacting the oil, they will whip air into it and cause it to foam. This happens when the oil level is too high. Foamy oil may still work as a barrier ...


9

Honestly, I have worked at three different types of places. First, it was aquick lube place in California. These can be good, if they have good management. The bad comes in when you have bad management, and they can "sell" things and not do them. These focus mostly on services they sell, and really glance at all other things. Second, it was a place like ...


9

It's a Diesel, which means that you usually have a high detergent oil in an engine that dumps combustion by-products like soot into the oil as part of its normal operation. Given the age of the vehicle I'm not surprised that the oil has noticeably darkened after 10 miles - one of the older Diesels I owned a while back did that during the time it took to run ...


8

In addition to keeping the recommended oil change schedule, here's a quick-and-dirty way to evaluate oil quality. Grab the dip stick and run it through your fingers to get them oily. Spread the oil on your fingers and observe: Transparent, honey-like colour, no visible sediments, nice greasy feeling? You are good to go. Transparent, dark-brown to black, ...


8

Simple answer - no, you can never get rid of ALL of the old oil - and you wouldn't want to, as you need to keep a film of oil over all the moving parts all the time. The small amount of residual oil will mix with the new oil quite happily. Oil flows better when it is warmer (as it gets thinner), so the best way to get as much of the sludge and residue out ...


7

I echo jzd's answer. The car's owner's manual should tell you what you need. To answer some more of your question: numbers like "5W30" are viscosity ratings. They indicate how viscous ("thick") the oil is. Most oils are "multi-viscosity," quoting a range of weights (e.g., 5W30 instead of 30W) to indicate how they behave at different temperatures. The "W" ...


7

Oil changes are a boring job! As Hasen says, a larger size oil catch pan is the only real solution. Before you start, try and estimate the direction of flow. If the drain plug is on the side of the sump (oil pan), the oil will begin to flow horizontally, curving down with gravity, and hit the ground around 9-12" out from the hole - assuming you're worknig ...


7

The first one is usually a much shorter interval, yes. This allows for bedding in, possibly flushing contaminants (I'd be upset if I had metal shavings in my engine when I got it) and allowing minor tolerance differences to be smoothed. Often a different oil type is used for that first period to assist with this process.


7

At least in the United States you are not required to use the dealer for service,parts or repairs to maintain your warranty. You will be required to have the warranty work done at the dealer except in extenuating circumstances,(like the nearest dealer is 150 miles away) but you must still contact them first. If they deny a warranty claim on the basis of non ...


7

This be what the internet gives me. I have never owned a BMW but I hope this helps. In the picture look for the red arrow and on your car look on the left rear side of the engine.


6

Usually the more sophisticated oil change indicators measure the way you drive and adjust for that - ie, if you're doing a lot of freeway miles you're probably getting longer intervals as that's not as hard on the oil as lots of stop and go in town. They are however making the assumption that you are using an oil that meets all the manufacturer's ...


6

Many new cars do in have "a sensor system that constantly monitors oil viscosity, conductivity, temperature and electrical parameters." See here: http://www.sensorland.com/AppPage064.html GM for example has been incorporating these into its Camaros, the Lambda platform, various Buicks, and more. Here is another link that might prove helpful to you: ...


6

The oil in the crankshaft is in contact with air and gasoline fumes. If you used an oil with an ignition point as low as the engine temperature, it would probably start a fire in there. I'm not sure how vigorous the fire would be (that likely depends on the air supply, which probably varies between engines), but it would eventually deplete the oil, cover ...


6

The worst thing that can happen is that you can destroy your vehicle. Your vehicle is designed to use some very specific lubrication, and using something other than what's specified can be detrimental. If the lubricant cannot withstand high temperatures, you could gunk up your engine and require a rebuild.


6

For OCD you can place a flat pan below the oil drain and lower the front wheels to get the remaining oil out, then jack it up again. Though I would not worry about couple of ounces in your place. Even if your car is level old oil will still remain in the engine (other cavities, thin film, etc.). For example in my engine that takes 4L of fresh oil, 2 ounces ...


5

To add to what others have said, diesel lube oil (the code starts with "C", like "CJ") is formulated to hold lots of soot, and after 10,000 miles, there probably was a lot of soot in the remaining oil that got mixed in with the new oil. When changing your own, never put "S" (for "spark") rated oil in a diesel engine!


5

Even if there is a "common area" of oil leaks it wouldn't make sense to change a part based on the most common failure. You need to find out where you car is leaking so you don't make a needless repair that could easily cost you hundreds of dollars. I would get a second estimate on locating the oil leak. Dye tests don't cost hundreds of dollars. The "Dye ...


5

Valve covers are a popular leak spot, across all vehicle makes and models.


5

I suspect that the 15% oil is talking about oil life. Just make sure that you check the oil level and top it off appropriately before taking the trip. Change the oil a quickly as possible once the trip is done.


5

This vehicle in your example photo is a really good example for when not to use an oil drain valve. Notice the heavy lugs on the all terrain tires? I am not sure if this vehicle is 4 wheel drive, but the tires indicate it the owner plans on driving on other than smooth paved highways. A drain valve on an off road vehicle, is an invitation for a long walk ...


5

I'm not sure what it specifically says, but it is indeed not safe to be under a car that is supported only by a jack, hydraulic or mechanical. To be safe, get a pair of jack stands, and use whatever jack you want to raise the car high enough to put the stands in place, then lower it so vehicle is resting on the stands. The jack that comes with the car ...


4

Check your owners manual. If you don't have one, you can probably find a copy online. You may find that the suggested oil change interval is more than 3000 or 6000 miles - for my Volvo, for example, the recommendation is for 7500 miles (12000 km). If you decide to use synthetic oils, the interval may be even higher. I know people have gone 20,000 miles ...


4

The main difference between the two is that flushing oil is extremely thin oil that theoretically should be able to get into partially blocked, thin passages without any issues and remove the accumulated gunk there as well. Oh, and out any slightly leaking gasket, too. It's usually also got a suitable cleaning additive if you've bought a good oil. The ...


4

Cold Starting Is Bad for All Engines At cold, oil flow is insufficient to properly lubricate the engine because the oil is too thick; in fact, no oil available with today's technology will provide sufficient flow at cold and also be able to protect the engine at operating temperature. The choice, then, is to pick an oil that will perform poorly at start up. ...


4

The short answer is that yes, you will still have to change your oil. As you say: in jet-engines, where the oil is sealed [emphasis added] The oil is not sealed in a car engine and, even if it doesn't wear out very quickly, it will still become dirty. Car engines and jet engines are very different beasts. You might be surprised to learn that some ...


4

Personally I'm not seeing an issue with replacing the washer. This is a $.05 part. For my '08 Hyundai Azera, it comes with the filter I get from my Hyundai dealer. Does it really need replaced? Probably not, but the one time when it does need changed and you don't do it may be the difference between a $.05 part and a $2500 overhaul/engine replacement. To me ...



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