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1

Each bluetooth device has a unique 48 bit address and a device name (up to 248 bytes). The name is usually shown when doing a bluetooth scan with a mobile device. The only way you can tell the bluetooth device is an OBD scanner is by checking it's name or address, the fact that it's an OBD scanner does not give it any special properties from the point of ...


1

None that I can think of off hand. I know for sure my Verus doesn't or any Snap-On scanner for that matter. Toyota Tech Stream doesn't offer this. GM Tech2 doesn't, and I'm pretty sure the Ford IDS doesn't either. Mode 6 decoding is spotty at best even in the professional world, and requires a list of TIDs to even decode what test is what most of the time.


4

1989 is OBD1, my favorite scanner for this vintage GM product is a Snap-On MT2500, you can find them on eBay fairly reasonable. Be sure the scanner comes with the GM1 aldl adapter, a Primary cartridge and a Troubleshooter cartridge and cables for your model year. You can short the proper pins (image below) to get the check engine light to flash any codes ...


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89 is OBD1 and requires specific connectors and a OBD1 scantool. You can jump pins A & B on the ALDL (Assembly Line Datalink Connector located under the driver side dash) to make the MIL flash out codes.


4

The OBD-II port is going to be the best place to interface with the vehicle. This is where you'd pull the information you are talking about. Your Telematics unit is probably just tying in directly to the wiring instead of the port to leave it open for smog testing or other maintenance testing. Is it going to be a problem if we start occupying the OBD ...


2

Mode 6 decode algorithms and databases, to the best of my knowledge, are only available to those scan tool makers who subscribe to the NASTF system. NASTF.org This is an industry organization that acts a go between the OEM's and the tool makers. Many tool makers are not members and those who make clones are not accepted into the group. Mode 6 data is not ...


2

We find FF so useful that we retain it on the customers invoice in case the same code sets later. It is also very helpful when used in conjunction with a test drive on intermittent faults. It tells exactly how to duplicate the conditions under which the fault set. There are times when its limit of setting on only one code is frustrating because it is not ...


3

They help us home in on what might be the root cause Maybe an example would help explain why freeze frames are so useful Here is the P0300 freeze frame from that infamous Merc GLK280: +-----------------------------------------+-------------+ | Fuel System 1 status | 1 | | Fuel System 2 status | 1 ...


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While the fault code that popped the MIL is tremendously useful by itself, freeze frame data offers huge help, as it allows you to see the exact conditions under which the engine decided that there is a fault. You will know at what RPM the code was popped, what the engine load was, whether the engine was warm and in closed loop mode, if it was overheating, ...


1

I was checking out mode 6. Here is a link that might help. http://www.counterman.com/unlock-the-mysteries-of-mode-06/ It is extremely difficult to find exact info on mode 6 data as the manufacturers seem to be secretive about it. The closest I got for Hyundai was this link where you ask technicians questions (and probably pay through the nose for it). ...



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