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5

It was indeed the catalytic converter (the EX does not have a pre-cat). After replacing it, the downstream sensor graph spends most of its time above 0.5 V, as it should if the converter is working. Update: I started getting this error code again, a little over a year after replacing the cat. I also finally found a guide on how to read these graphs, from ...


5

Pending code? The user manual for your device says it should say "PD" for pending codes, so maybe not. "P0130 P" isn't a valid DTC for your vehicle so pending code is really all that makes sense. More specific to your model P0130 is front oxygen sensor circuit range/performance problem (Lean) Possible causes: Open wire to O2 Sensor Short to ground in O2 ...


4

The ECU may have "tuned" itself to the gap and behavior of the old plugs. When you had the plugs replaced, if the shop did not disconnect the battery (and even if they did, not sure about your Ford) the ECU would still have the long term fuel trims that matched your old plugs in effect. So this may result in a bit less or more fuel being injected and ...


3

I doubt your sensor requires soldering. I would recommend always going with OEM parts, as they ensure the values the sensor sends are accurate. Next, verify which sensor it is as some cars have 4 and are divided into banks (sides). The code should say which side you are looking at. The sensor itself might need a special socket, but that is not necessarily ...


3

A quick way to check your O2 sensor, is to record all the codes (On paper, or whatever) and swap the sensors. If the code goes to bank 2, than you know you need a sensor. These are sometimes hard to find, due to the many things that can trigger an O2 fault. This is just a quick way to check the sensors, just be sure to reset the codes after recording them.


3

Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the sensor downstream of the catalytic converter. Bank 1 Sensor 1 would be upstream of the catalytic converter. With a 4 cylinder, everything should be Bank 1 (No Bank 2). So, Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the one under the car. The one on/at the exhaust manifold should be Bank 1 Sensor 1. You might eyeball the wiring and / or ...


3

Replacing the broken fan switch seems to have made the CEL go away. My best guess is that the ECU starts monitoring the O2 sensor output as soon as this sensor reads that the engine is hot, and gets upset when the O2 sensor is actually still cold. Edit: Nope, the CEL is back, and gas mileage has been really bad (around 18-19mpg on a car that usually gets ...


2

From everything I see in this paper, it seems that it may be related to a vacuum leak. tl;dr - Check your vacuum lines and make sure none of them are cracked. Here are some more ideas from here: P2197 Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean Detailed Description A heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) indicating lean at the end of a test is ...


2

I just had these exact symptoms with a 2002 Vauxhall Astra. As well as the Crankshaft Sensor error (and the garage confirmed it had previously thrown out an O2 sensor error). Mine was the EGR valve, with fuels that use a lot of additives (here in the UK that's 'supermarket fuel') the valve quickly becomes caked in carbon. The EGR (exhaust gas ...


2

Checking a list of TSBs for this set of codes, this looks like a promising candidate: 01-028/04 MAZDA SPECIAL PROGRAM (MSP05) - 2004 MAZDA3 - O2 SENSOR DTC ERROR, P2195 / P2196 From what you describe, a problematic O2 sensor could easily lead to the idling, sputtering and smells that you describe. If the sensor is stuck reading full lean, it's highly ...


1

The 50 g/s max flow reading that you are getting is far lower than what merely altitude can explain. The chart above shows that at about 5,200 ft above sea level, the density of air is 83% of what it is at sea level (0.062 lb/cu.ft vs. .075 lb/cu.ft). So to account for the altitude, you should multiply your expected mass flow by 0.83. According to the ...


1

The fault code P0171 descriptor is Bank 1 running weak. The fault code P0174 descriptor is Bank 2 running weak. This means that your engine has too much air or not enough fuel for proper ignition. This can be a faulty MAF sensor as it is common to both banks. It can also mean that you have an air leak between the MAF sensor and the throttle body, a faulty ...


1

the oxygen sensor needed replacing You may have identified the root of all of your issues. Depending on exactly what is happening with your faulty O2 sensor, it could affect any aspect of the intake-combustion-exhaust cycle. I would expect exactly the sort of symptoms that you cite; specifically, rough idle and reduced performance are to be expected.


1

I have a 1st Generation (1995-1999) Toyota Avalon with a P1135 error also. I change the Denso Air Fuel Sensor P/N: 234-9007 and it solve the problem and the check engine light went away. I change it from the top instead of going under the car it was really easy. Hope this help like other have help me.


1

Both codes look to be related. P1135 Air/Fuel Sensor Heater Circuit Response (Bank 1 Sensor 1) P1155 Air/Fuel Sensor Heater Circuit. (Bank 1 Sensor 2) Source: http://www.engine-light-help.com Replacing the sensor may fix the issue, but as pointed out in the answer to your previous question: it is not always the sensor that goes bad. Sensors ...


1

I got the same code with 2000 tundra. I found you need to compare HO₂S Sensor 2 to engine load. If engine load is low enough, the sensor voltage should be 0 for a period of time as well. When decelerating, engine load is low, rpm is low and throttle position probably is close. Not a technician, just leaning.


1

A common problem in civics of that year. It's not the main catalyst that goes bad, it's the pre-cat (the one hanging right off the exhaust manifold). This one is for cold start and once your car is warmed up, the lions share of the work is done by your main catalyst. Take it in to the dealer to have your precat checked. Many cars have a 10 year warranty ...


1

The only foreseeable problem would come from mixture problems due to your O2 sensor readings. Look for a wiring diagram somewhere, and see if the components share any common grounds or points. Repairing a wire can be cheap if you can do it, as the bulk of the labor cost will likely come in trouble shooting it. As far as the EGR goes, it is more of an ...



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