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9

It should hold up. It melts at around twice the temperature where water boils, which I don't think you'll ever experience in the engine bay (unless it's touching the exhaust). But the greasiness in the engine may make for a poor adhesion. BTW: I am one of those people who would rather crimp than solder.


6

Pending code? The user manual for your device says it should say "PD" for pending codes, so maybe not. "P0130 P" isn't a valid DTC for your vehicle so pending code is really all that makes sense. More specific to your model P0130 is front oxygen sensor circuit range/performance problem (Lean) Possible causes: Open wire to O2 Sensor Short to ground in O2 ...


6

It was indeed the catalytic converter (the EX does not have a pre-cat). After replacing it, the downstream sensor graph spends most of its time above 0.5 V, as it should if the converter is working. Update: I started getting this error code again, a little over a year after replacing the cat. I also finally found a guide on how to read these graphs, from ...


6

No, you don't have to rely on wire colors to figure out what's what. With nothing more than a decent multimeter and premix flame (blowtorch or gas stove), a two-test sequence can reveal the identity of each wire, assuming the O2 sensor is fully-functional: Determine the heater wires This should be done first. These wires serve to heat up the O2 sensor ...


5

I doubt you're going to be able to have someone put a number on this. I'm betting you also know that just because no error was thrown, it doesn't mean that the sensor isn't impacting performance. Lifehacker notes that replacing them could improve mileage "up to 15%." As @BobCross mentioned, "most people wouldn't consider it worth their time to do the ...


4

The ECU may have "tuned" itself to the gap and behavior of the old plugs. When you had the plugs replaced, if the shop did not disconnect the battery (and even if they did, not sure about your Ford) the ECU would still have the long term fuel trims that matched your old plugs in effect. So this may result in a bit less or more fuel being injected and ...


4

Buy the correct O2 sensor, hacking up the OEM harness to put a different O2 sensor on the car is a bad idea.


4

With the check engine light on, the car is going to be running a fixed set of parameters from the Engine Control Module. For instance Fuel Pressure will be held at max pressure and timing and spark adjustments (if done electronically) will not retard or advance. One of the reasons this happens is because the Engine Control Module is not recieving all of ...


4

If you are going to replace the sensor and have already purchased the replacement, cut the wires off of the old sensor and put a 1/2" drive deep well socket onto it (don't use the split socket for the O2 sensor to take it off, but you will use it to put it back on). Use a breaker bar to break it free, then use a ratchet the rest of the way. If you do not ...


4

As @LynnCrumbling stated, this would be hard to put a number on, mainly because it depends on too many factors. This is what I can tell you. When O2 sensors get old, they don't necessarily go bad, what they do is get lazy. When a good O2 sensor is doing its thing, if you were to look at the readings from it, the numbers go all over the place, from top of the ...


4

Disconnect your battery to reset your ECU. It won't hurt, and is probably the cheapest and easiest thing you can try. 30 minutes is usually enough. There are other theories as to why your mileage went down, but I think you're on the right track thinking the ECU hasn't learned to use the new data correctly. I am thinking that because your new 02 sensor is ...


3

Also, remember that MAF is a reading of the amount of air entering the engine. If you have a backflow issues (high backpressure) or even a timing issue where the valves are not opening and closing at the correct time (slack chains, jumped timing), your MAF sensor readings will reflect this as well. I know this post is late, but any who are looking into this ...


3

From time to time you do come across a rusted in sensor. Your vehicle being a 2001, and O2 sensors lasting some time, yours is rusted in. If sheer force does not work you may need to use an oxy-acetalyne torch on the sensor to heat to it red-hot to break the rusting and undo it with a good single-hex deep socket. I have had one or two sensors break up and ...


3

I doubt your sensor requires soldering. I would recommend always going with OEM parts, as they ensure the values the sensor sends are accurate. Next, verify which sensor it is as some cars have 4 and are divided into banks (sides). The code should say which side you are looking at. The sensor itself might need a special socket, but that is not necessarily ...


3

A quick way to check your O2 sensor, is to record all the codes (On paper, or whatever) and swap the sensors. If the code goes to bank 2, than you know you need a sensor. These are sometimes hard to find, due to the many things that can trigger an O2 fault. This is just a quick way to check the sensors, just be sure to reset the codes after recording them.


3

Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the sensor downstream of the catalytic converter. Bank 1 Sensor 1 would be upstream of the catalytic converter. With a 4 cylinder, everything should be Bank 1 (No Bank 2). So, Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the one under the car. The one on/at the exhaust manifold should be Bank 1 Sensor 1. You might eyeball the wiring and / or ...


3

Replacing the broken fan switch seems to have made the CEL go away. My best guess is that the ECU starts monitoring the O2 sensor output as soon as this sensor reads that the engine is hot, and gets upset when the O2 sensor is actually still cold. Edit: Nope, the CEL is back, and gas mileage has been really bad (around 18-19mpg on a car that usually gets ...


3

A narrowband sensor can only measure 14.7:1 AFR (stoichiometric) , where as wideband sensors allows you to measure a range of AFR ~(<10 to ~20). ECU's that rely on narrowband output maintain the AFR at stoich by using closed loop control (cruise etc) and may use various interpolation methods for increasing the open loop accuracy for AFR other than stoich. ...


3

If the catalytic convertor is truly plugged, you wouldn't be able to drive the vehicle, so this makes me wonder about the voracity of your statement. With a plugged cat, the back pressure created behind it will only let you rev the engine to around 1500-2000 rpm. I had to replace a set of heads on a pick-up truck for a guy because he continued to run the ...


2

From everything I see in this paper, it seems that it may be related to a vacuum leak. tl;dr - Check your vacuum lines and make sure none of them are cracked. Here are some more ideas from here: P2197 Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean Detailed Description A heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) indicating lean at the end of a test is ...


2

I just had these exact symptoms with a 2002 Vauxhall Astra. As well as the Crankshaft Sensor error (and the garage confirmed it had previously thrown out an O2 sensor error). Mine was the EGR valve, with fuels that use a lot of additives (here in the UK that's 'supermarket fuel') the valve quickly becomes caked in carbon. The EGR (exhaust gas ...


2

Checking a list of TSBs for this set of codes, this looks like a promising candidate: 01-028/04 MAZDA SPECIAL PROGRAM (MSP05) - 2004 MAZDA3 - O2 SENSOR DTC ERROR, P2195 / P2196 From what you describe, a problematic O2 sensor could easily lead to the idling, sputtering and smells that you describe. If the sensor is stuck reading full lean, it's highly ...


2

Short answer, yes - a faulty O2 can make the Check Engine Light / MIL to go on. Do you know what the code is?


2

Solder (60/40) or any other lead-based sort has little mechanical strength. And it decreases as heat goes up. Furthermore, some of the wires used in various places don't work very well with field soldering (such as Litz wire). On the other hand many of them don't work well with mechanical fastening, ie, crimping. Depending on the wires you're working with, ...


2

According to research I've done on the web, the W in WO2S11 stands for wideband, meaning it can calculate much better than a standard O2 sensor. This, I would assume, is what your car is utilizing to get its O2 reading and not the O2S11. And yes, that would be for the bank 1 sensor 1 (upstream or before cat). Your issue is not with the B1S1, though, it's ...


2

Just thought I'd bring this in to an answer to allow it to be accepted: This, while not ideal for you in this situation, is to prevent accidental connection to the wrong sensor. This solution is used in any number of applications, on ships, aircraft, even buildings - and in a car you will find many examples. It's one of the reasons I always read the manual ...


2

Based on fueleconomy.gov your are getting a little better than what's expected. Comparing the less accurate old rating system to the new, it's still not as high as you were expecting, but it was higher. Compare Old and New MPG Estimates The manual transmission with the 2.0 gets the best mileage that year If you look up mpg on some sites it just ...


2

There are two things which could potentially cause you issues with this. First, you don't know if it is conductive. One of the properties of anti-seize is that it maintains conductivity between the two parts. In this way it works great for spark plugs and O2 sensors. I was reading about it on Wikipedia and it was a little beyond my comprehension right now ...


1

Which sensor does the code say is bad? You should have 2 oxygen sensors, one before the catalytic convertor and one after. Be sure to check everywhere from the exhaust manifold to the muffler. I don't specifically where the o2 sensor are in your model, but check the cat itself as well.


1

the oxygen sensor needed replacing You may have identified the root of all of your issues. Depending on exactly what is happening with your faulty O2 sensor, it could affect any aspect of the intake-combustion-exhaust cycle. I would expect exactly the sort of symptoms that you cite; specifically, rough idle and reduced performance are to be expected.



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