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This could be one of several things: Swaybar links broken or missing Worn out strut/shock mount (on either end) Worn out suspension parts ... anywhere the suspension has a bushing which meets the car itself Without being there in person, it's hard to tell beyond that what it might be. I mean, it could also be a loose spare in the trunk area.


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You need to identify exactly where the sound is coming from. To do this, jack up the front end and put it on jack stands. If it's what I'm thinking it is, you can probably keep the tires straight, then have one person hold one tire while you turn the other. If the noise is coming from the differential, as you are saying, you are probably going to need a ...


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There is no way, to my way of thinking, this could be the bearings in the engine. There is absolutely no way you could get any type of penetrating oil into the bearing area of the engine using any type of spray means. These areas are sealed against outside contamination by means of a seal and oil pressure (meaning, if the seal starts to fail, you'd see oil ...


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Many times it is not practical to find real cause. I can say with 80% certainty if you properly install another new pump, it should solve your problem. Buy one from autohausaz.com and watch Youtube to learn how to do it yourself and then do it yourself. Should cost less than $200.


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It sounds as though your serpentine belt is the issue. The serpentine belt is connected to each pulley (a pulley is the circular disc that the rubber belt travels over) of various engine components (power steering, AC, turbocharger if you have one, etc) and as such has a lot of tension on it, but can't have too much. It may be that the dealer installed a ...


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It sounds as though your serpentine belt is worn out or that the tensioner pulley is not doing it's job (or both). As you start the engine, there is a high draw on the battery, which power must then be replaced via the alternator. When this happens, there is a large demand put on the alternator. If the serpentine belt or tensioner are not up to the job, then ...


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Another reason for a squeak when you accelerate would be a busted motor mount, especially on transverse engines. BUT, I would check the brakes and hood stops first, as suggested by the other answers.


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This may be a longshot since it only occurs when accelerating, but it could be the rubber hood stops under the hood squeaking. You could try turning them out one or two rotations to see if that stops the squeak, or add some of those furniture foot pads underneath. This sound is most noticeable over speed-bumps or potholes. I had a squeak in my 2011 ...


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If there are no noticeable rocks/debris as Steve states another possibility is it may be normal noise. Tires will deform slightly when rolling to form a flat contact patch with the road surface. When this happens the rubber treads stretch and compress and make "groaning" sounds. The quality and type of rubber, the tread pattern, and the age of the tire ...


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Common causes from personal experience are general related to stones or pebbles jammed somewhere. Places to check are in the tyre treads themselves and also between the brake disc and the dust guard behind the disc (don't burn yourself though as the disc can become quite hot after recent operation).


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Going by your definition of comfort, I would suggest an SUV over a sedan. SUV's are more family oriented and are largely marketed either to women doing the school run, or guys doing off-road stuff. Both of those things require comfortable seating and driving dynamics. Here's why: Less noise. SUV's have quieter exhausts as a general rule. They also have ...


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If you are considering buying a car and comfort is a requirement, look for cars which offer a height adjustable steering wheel, adjustable lumbar support in the seat and height adjustment on the seat. Also, avoid the "sport" models as these are typically more firmly sprung so you will feel bumps in the road more severely. Finally, test drive any ...


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I've worked on the lifters in a Dodge 6G72 engine ( and also the Dodge 2.2/2.5L engines). The lifters are oil filled. There is a tiny valve on them that allows oil in. When the vehicle has not been run for a while, or runs low on oil, the lifters will loose oil. As oil pressure build up, they will 'pump up'. So the issue is not that they are sticking, ...


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I found a great article out there on the interwebz which explains this very well (and confirms my line of thinking) for the BMW M62 engine. I'm sure the explanation is pretty much the same for other engines of the same type. Basically, the author of the article states these engines do not have rocker arms, but instead uses a cam on lifter on valve setup. ...


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I'd imagine it is down to lubrication - if the engine isn't used for some time, the oil all seeps back down into the sump, and without lubrication, the lifters will stick. After running the engine again, oil has been pumped back up and worked it's way back around the lifters, lubricating them and freeing them up...


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You're probably right, but it could also come from the inside of any of the exhaust components. A failed catalytic converter can be VERY noisy. Once I had a failing front-muffler/resonator too and it was producing a rattling sound at low speed. That would also explain the echoey sound. The best way to determine that is to hit every single exhaust component ...


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My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...



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