Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Unidirectional tires should NOT be cross rotated. "Uni" implies one, as in one direction (nothing to do with singing). Radials in general should not be cross rotated. They start behaving as you have discribed, with the noise and all. With all this said, I don't believe your tires are unidirectional, but again, once radials have been driven for a period of ...


4

I found a great article out there on the interwebz which explains this very well (and confirms my line of thinking) for the BMW M62 engine. I'm sure the explanation is pretty much the same for other engines of the same type. Basically, the author of the article states these engines do not have rocker arms, but instead uses a cam on lifter on valve setup. ...


3

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


2

Well at the risk of sounding crass, I think you already know what you have to do. The winter tires will cause an excess of road noise on dry pavement. I doubt you will ever need them in the area of the world you are in, so would highly suggest you replace them with some good summer tires. The first bushing you are describing sounds like the strut mount at ...


2

From your description, it seems like you are hearing normal sounds of operation while running over rough spots in the road created by cranes running down the road and creating divots in the road which are equally spaced apart. This can cause an extreme amount of noise in the cabin as you drive. Here in the state of Virginia (and in other states here in the ...


2

Apparently this particular model suffers from this issue in cold climates. This is due to the factory o-ring failing to provide a good seal and thus allowing air to enter the Power Steering Pump Inlet. The fix is to replace the o-ring. A step by step guide to this is provided in this link


2

It's more than likely the serpentine belt at the alternator making the noise. One of two things going on here, either the belt itself is worn out, or the tensioner is not providing the preload to the belt to keep it tight. After the belt warms up a little bit, it sticks a little better so the sound goes away. If you haven't replaced the belt in a while, I'd ...


2

Typically a very loud, low rumbling noise means that your wheel bearings are going bad. I'd be willing to bet that depending on how the sound sounds, it is your wheel bearing. They are not typically very expensive to fix, but you will most likely need to take it to a shop, because you will need a bearing puller to complete the replacement.


2

Yes, the squealing is most assuredly associated with the dead battery and symptoms you describe. What is probably happening is either the serpentine belt is worn out (hard to diagnose due to how it wears) and/or the tensioner pulley is not providing enough traction for the belt. On start-up, the alternator works overtime trying to charge the battery of the ...


2

While it is difficult to diagnose car sounds over the Internet, I would say pretty confidently that the sound is coming from the transmission for the reasons below; You have stated that the pitch of the sound follows the speed of the vehicle, which would lead me to believe this is specifically the final drive or 'differential' (inside the transmission on a ...


2

With the limited info available it sounds like the ABS pump running. I can't think of anything else that cycles that fast. Why it would be running at start up I haven't a clue. You could try pulling the ABS fuse and see if the noise stops.


2

My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...


2

I've worked on the lifters in a Dodge 6G72 engine ( and also the Dodge 2.2/2.5L engines). The lifters are oil filled. There is a tiny valve on them that allows oil in. When the vehicle has not been run for a while, or runs low on oil, the lifters will loose oil. As oil pressure build up, they will 'pump up'. So the issue is not that they are sticking, ...


2

You need to identify exactly where the sound is coming from. To do this, jack up the front end and put it on jack stands. If it's what I'm thinking it is, you can probably keep the tires straight, then have one person hold one tire while you turn the other. If the noise is coming from the differential, as you are saying, you are probably going to need a ...


1

As noted in the comments, it can be difficult to diagnose from very little information. However, some things worth considering: Disk brakes have one or (more usually) two springs between the brake pads and the calipers: the pads move along these springs when in use. If they have been installed in an incorrect position (or even omitted - have seen that), ...


1

I had a similar issue on my truck. What I found was the caliper was not moving correctly and the pad was wearing unevenly. One side of the caliper was stuck, so was causing the issue. For my truck, there is a rod which the caliper attaches to. This rod had rusted and was not allowing free movement. This caused the brake pad to wear unevenly and cause the ...


1

With the lack of information you've (haven't) provided, there is only one thing which I can think of which might be causing the noise you are describing, and that is if the main bearing in the front of the transmission is going out. When you push in the clutch pedal, the transmission is disconnected from the engine and is therefor not turning. When the ...


1

There are two main things which are probably causing you the noise. First is the engine noise. Diesels can put out an extensive amount of noise. This radiates into the cab of the vehicle. You basically have a big box on wheels which focuses and reverberates the sound around inside causing it to amplify somewhat. This makes for a little more noise than what ...


1

Is the noise level comparable to the one on new Ford Transit? Extra torque from the diesel could have torn the motor mounts. I would visually inspect them to see if they need to be replaced or even upgraded.


1

The standard test for a wheel bearing goes something like this: Jack up the appropriate end/corner of the car and support it on axle-stands Grasp the wheel firmly at top and bottom and try to shake it - there should be a tiny amount of movement, any more is suspect. Repeat step 2 for side-to-side Spin the wheel and listen for any unusual noise, or ...


1

tl;dr The sound is probably caused by your brakes, most likely worn brake pads. Firstly, you would only hear "tyre squeal" if the vehicle is losing (or at least scrabbling for) grip during the braking period. If that's the case, you will know it's the tyres! That takes a lot of braking force, and not likely something that will happen casually. So, I ...


1

It is probably going to be one of your pulley wheels, but I doubt it's the pump. If it's brand new, they usually don't make any noise at all. It is either going to be one of either the idler or tensioner pulleys. And if you don't know which one is which, if you eliminate all of the other pulleys which have things attached to them, you should have one ...


1

It sounds as though your serpentine belt is the issue. The serpentine belt is connected to each pulley (a pulley is the circular disc that the rubber belt travels over) of various engine components (power steering, AC, turbocharger if you have one, etc) and as such has a lot of tension on it, but can't have too much. It may be that the dealer installed a ...


1

Your vehicle is a light-weight-build mass volume vehicle and under hard conditions would be susceptable to drumming. Never the less, your vehicle should be inspected for suspension, wheels and hubs, steering and exhaust being present and correct and in servicable condition. The recent deterioation in your local roads may be emphasising an already present ...


1

Various Nissan models, and other vehicles, have an Extra Air Pump (EAP). When the engine is first started from cold the oxygen sensors are running cold and not up to operating temperature. To control any emissions whilst cold an EAP runs to pump air into the exhaust to help clean it up until the oxygen sensors are fully working, you may have a noisy pump. ...


1

As discussed in the comments already, the clicking you hear is probably the starter solenoid. You have ruled out a weak battery being the probable cause by attempting to the jump-start the engine. This means either the power cable running directly from the battery to the starter motor is too resistive/poorly connected, or that the starter motor itself is no ...


1

Two common sources of water rushing noises are water in one or more of the doors and air in the cooling system causing gurgling in the heater core. For the doors, check the bottom edge of all doors including the lift gate. There are small rubber drains that allow water to drain when it rains. If they become clogged the doors begin to fill with water and can ...


1

Since you're soliciting thoughts & suggestions... ...it's possible that your Pilot, which has unibody construction, has picked up some water inside its integrated frame, and you actually hear that water moving around inside the frame. I've had that happen before - in my case, a plastic plug was missing and when I drove through a large puddle the frame ...


1

In this case, the sound came from the rear brake pads which had completely worn away down to the metal backing. Once I replaced the rear pads and rotors (which had significant scoring) the sound went away.


1

When you are driving in a straight line, the load on the front axle is shared equally between the two front hubs, so any noises will be low. When you turn to the left, there is a weight transfer to the outside wheel(right wheel) and any noises from it will be more accentuated/louder. It is the opposite when you turn right. You need to check your hub bearings ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible