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10

It is the sound of the fuel pump priming and pressurizing the fuel lines, which is absolutely normal. VW likes to use the opening of the driver door to trigger fuel rail pressurization. In fact, one could use the absence of the sound of the fuel pump as a tell-tale sign that the fuel pump relay is not functioning properly. As @Paulster2 points out, either ...


8

From personal experience, I'd replaced ALOT of these working at the dealership. It wasn't just the accords either, it was quite a few Honda and Acuras that used the same design and power delivery system. The most common issues I saw out of probably close to 100+ failures of these was: Ground strap on the starter becoming corroded. Bad ground to engine ...


7

Diagnosing noises when you're thousands of miles away isn't going to be easy, but here are a few tips to help you out: remove the serpentine belt and run the engine If the noise stops, you know that the noise source is something that is running off the serpentine. inspect the belt for loss of tension Loose belts are notorious for squealing spin the ...


5

Your problem could be caused by two things. A shitty car charger, they are not all created equal, or a ground loop. As far as the charger goes try several different ones, name brand ones tend to be the best (htc, iphone, samsung, etc...). If the problem goes away then it was the charger. As far as a ground loop, what happens is that the ground potential ...


4

For anyone who has similar issues I had a similar issue however I don't think it was exactly same. I tried the steps in the accepted answer with no success. Research on my own I tried different phones and noticed that some would have the static at low volumes and other would not. I looked online and sometimes the phone can cause this to happen. How I ...


4

I found a great article out there on the interwebz which explains this very well (and confirms my line of thinking) for the BMW M62 engine. I'm sure the explanation is pretty much the same for other engines of the same type. Basically, the author of the article states these engines do not have rocker arms, but instead uses a cam on lifter on valve setup. ...


4

Set the valve clearance with feeler gauges. Exhaust .012" Intake .010". 30 yrs of Honda and I still do not trust any other method. If one of my employees does not use gauges we will be having a chat... Rod knock is usually much more evident on acceleration and not heard at idle until the damage is quite advanced. The noise can vary but is usually a lower ...


4

Based upon the information you've provided I can think of two things that may create the "medium frequency whirring" sound. 1. Low Power Steering Fluid When your power steering fluid is low the fluid cannot absorb sound and what you hear is the pump possibly going bad as a result. Sometimes, when the fluid is just low there will be audible component ...


4

Seeing as how changing your thermostat is a variable in this. This sounds more like an HVAC or blower motor issue. If the thermostat fixed it and you now have issues again during winter along with clunking, I would say it's probably a compressor or blower motor issue. Those can cause a clunking sound. Typically you can diagnose a problem with these sounds ...


3

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


3

It definitely does sound like a bad wheel hub bearing. Classic pattern of woob-woob-woob-woob. The sound is made as the bearing inner race wobbles around the outer race. This is a safety issue. Replace as soon as possible. Did you take a look at the CV joints? A bad CV boot could have damaged the bearing by filling it up with gunk (a mix of dirt and ...


3

If I am not mistaken the 2001 Yamaha Diversion has a clutch cable and does not have a hydraulic self adjusting clutch mechanism. This was my son's first motorcycle and we experienced similar issues with his. I will say that this model is bullet proof. Especially the 8 valve air cooled version which you have. Throw Out Bearing If your throw out bearing ...


3

tl dr; More pressure = less noise. Here is a pretty good write-up about the affects of tire noise. In the write-up it states the following: Tires running higher inflation pressures generate lower noise levels compared to those with lower inflation levels. This holds true to my line of thought because a flat tire (or very low tire) will make a lot ...


3

I would check/replace the strut's top mount. The rubber may be worn allowing excessive movement at the top of the strut. Try pulling in the strut to see if the top mount moves excessively. If the rubber looks OK and nothing is worn, try loosening the mounting bolts and see if it can be relocated slightly to move the spring away from the panel it is ...


3

Unfortunately I can not pinpoint your issue, but will give you the information I have. Since the noise is not speed dependent, yet does not exhibit itself when the transmission is not engaged (either through disengaged clutch or left in neutral), it is my approximation the noise emanates from the transmission. The noise sounds only when the transmission is ...


3

Carbon-metallic Brake Pads If you do have carbon-metallic brake pads, especially high performance ones like you might find on an Audi S4 (although I can't say for sure), the material that they are made out of do tend to be prone to noise which is an artifact that occurs from the manufacturer trying to optimise for braking efficiency. How to Fix Brake Noise ...


2

This may be a longshot since it only occurs when accelerating, but it could be the rubber hood stops under the hood squeaking. You could try turning them out one or two rotations to see if that stops the squeak, or add some of those furniture foot pads underneath. This sound is most noticeable over speed-bumps or potholes. I had a squeak in my 2011 ...


2

Apparently this particular model suffers from this issue in cold climates. This is due to the factory o-ring failing to provide a good seal and thus allowing air to enter the Power Steering Pump Inlet. The fix is to replace the o-ring. A step by step guide to this is provided in this link


2

It sounds as though your serpentine belt is the issue. The serpentine belt is connected to each pulley (a pulley is the circular disc that the rubber belt travels over) of various engine components (power steering, AC, turbocharger if you have one, etc) and as such has a lot of tension on it, but can't have too much. It may be that the dealer installed a ...


2

It's more than likely the serpentine belt at the alternator making the noise. One of two things going on here, either the belt itself is worn out, or the tensioner is not providing the preload to the belt to keep it tight. After the belt warms up a little bit, it sticks a little better so the sound goes away. If you haven't replaced the belt in a while, I'd ...


2

Typically a very loud, low rumbling noise means that your wheel bearings are going bad. I'd be willing to bet that depending on how the sound sounds, it is your wheel bearing. They are not typically very expensive to fix, but you will most likely need to take it to a shop, because you will need a bearing puller to complete the replacement.


2

While it is difficult to diagnose car sounds over the Internet, I would say pretty confidently that the sound is coming from the transmission for the reasons below; You have stated that the pitch of the sound follows the speed of the vehicle, which would lead me to believe this is specifically the final drive or 'differential' (inside the transmission on a ...


2

With the limited info available it sounds like the ABS pump running. I can't think of anything else that cycles that fast. Why it would be running at start up I haven't a clue. You could try pulling the ABS fuse and see if the noise stops.


2

Yes, the squealing is most assuredly associated with the dead battery and symptoms you describe. What is probably happening is either the serpentine belt is worn out (hard to diagnose due to how it wears) and/or the tensioner pulley is not providing enough traction for the belt. On start-up, the alternator works overtime trying to charge the battery of the ...


2

My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...


2

I've worked on the lifters in a Dodge 6G72 engine ( and also the Dodge 2.2/2.5L engines). The lifters are oil filled. There is a tiny valve on them that allows oil in. When the vehicle has not been run for a while, or runs low on oil, the lifters will loose oil. As oil pressure build up, they will 'pump up'. So the issue is not that they are sticking, ...


2

You need to identify exactly where the sound is coming from. To do this, jack up the front end and put it on jack stands. If it's what I'm thinking it is, you can probably keep the tires straight, then have one person hold one tire while you turn the other. If the noise is coming from the differential, as you are saying, you are probably going to need a ...


2

There is a very good chance that the clutch throwout bearing was not inserted flush into the 'throwout arm'. If the bearing is off center (which is possible but not guaranteed) it can make some strange whirring noises.


2

Whistling is one of the main defects of Square Roof Bars , what you can do is install something called as windjammers which are nothing but sheet of metal/plastic which acts as a wind deflectors and makes the bars more aerodynamic. some examples are http://www.amazon.com/Yakima-8001115-WindJammer/dp/B0012SDZZG Also what you can do is tie some ropes ...


2

I take it that you're referring to the noise of the engine in the engine bay rather than the exhaust. I'm personally still amazed by the number of parts that go together to form an engine (and a car in general). Over time of course, almost all of these parts will wear. Serpentine belts will wear. Non OEM air intakes can be very loud (modifications are often ...



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