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9

It is the sound of the fuel pump priming and pressurizing the fuel lines, which is absolutely normal. VW likes to use the opening of the driver door to trigger fuel rail pressurization. In fact, one could use the absence of the sound of the fuel pump as a tell-tale sign that the fuel pump relay is not functioning properly. As @Paulster2 points out, either ...


5

Unidirectional tires should NOT be cross rotated. "Uni" implies one, as in one direction (nothing to do with singing). Radials in general should not be cross rotated. They start behaving as you have discribed, with the noise and all. With all this said, I don't believe your tires are unidirectional, but again, once radials have been driven for a period of ...


4

For anyone who has similar issues I had a similar issue however I don't think it was exactly same. I tried the steps in the accepted answer with no success. Research on my own I tried different phones and noticed that some would have the static at low volumes and other would not. I looked online and sometimes the phone can cause this to happen. How I ...


4

I found a great article out there on the interwebz which explains this very well (and confirms my line of thinking) for the BMW M62 engine. I'm sure the explanation is pretty much the same for other engines of the same type. Basically, the author of the article states these engines do not have rocker arms, but instead uses a cam on lifter on valve setup. ...


3

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


3

tl dr; More pressure = less noise. Here is a pretty good write-up about the affects of tire noise. In the write-up it states the following: Tires running higher inflation pressures generate lower noise levels compared to those with lower inflation levels. This holds true to my line of thought because a flat tire (or very low tire) will make a lot ...


2

It turns out that the brake pads were improperly installed. Furthermore, the problem seemed to occur far more often when the breaks were wet. I;m not sure if that caused the pads to "slip" more or what.


2

Apparently this particular model suffers from this issue in cold climates. This is due to the factory o-ring failing to provide a good seal and thus allowing air to enter the Power Steering Pump Inlet. The fix is to replace the o-ring. A step by step guide to this is provided in this link


2

It's more than likely the serpentine belt at the alternator making the noise. One of two things going on here, either the belt itself is worn out, or the tensioner is not providing the preload to the belt to keep it tight. After the belt warms up a little bit, it sticks a little better so the sound goes away. If you haven't replaced the belt in a while, I'd ...


2

Typically a very loud, low rumbling noise means that your wheel bearings are going bad. I'd be willing to bet that depending on how the sound sounds, it is your wheel bearing. They are not typically very expensive to fix, but you will most likely need to take it to a shop, because you will need a bearing puller to complete the replacement.


2

While it is difficult to diagnose car sounds over the Internet, I would say pretty confidently that the sound is coming from the transmission for the reasons below; You have stated that the pitch of the sound follows the speed of the vehicle, which would lead me to believe this is specifically the final drive or 'differential' (inside the transmission on a ...


2

With the limited info available it sounds like the ABS pump running. I can't think of anything else that cycles that fast. Why it would be running at start up I haven't a clue. You could try pulling the ABS fuse and see if the noise stops.


2

Yes, the squealing is most assuredly associated with the dead battery and symptoms you describe. What is probably happening is either the serpentine belt is worn out (hard to diagnose due to how it wears) and/or the tensioner pulley is not providing enough traction for the belt. On start-up, the alternator works overtime trying to charge the battery of the ...


2

My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...


2

I've worked on the lifters in a Dodge 6G72 engine ( and also the Dodge 2.2/2.5L engines). The lifters are oil filled. There is a tiny valve on them that allows oil in. When the vehicle has not been run for a while, or runs low on oil, the lifters will loose oil. As oil pressure build up, they will 'pump up'. So the issue is not that they are sticking, ...


2

You need to identify exactly where the sound is coming from. To do this, jack up the front end and put it on jack stands. If it's what I'm thinking it is, you can probably keep the tires straight, then have one person hold one tire while you turn the other. If the noise is coming from the differential, as you are saying, you are probably going to need a ...


1

You're probably right, but it could also come from the inside of any of the exhaust components. A failed catalytic converter can be VERY noisy. Once I had a failing front-muffler/resonator too and it was producing a rattling sound at low speed. That would also explain the echoey sound. The best way to determine that is to hit every single exhaust component ...


1

As noted in the comments, it can be difficult to diagnose from very little information. However, some things worth considering: Disk brakes have one or (more usually) two springs between the brake pads and the calipers: the pads move along these springs when in use. If they have been installed in an incorrect position (or even omitted - have seen that), ...


1

I had a similar issue on my truck. What I found was the caliper was not moving correctly and the pad was wearing unevenly. One side of the caliper was stuck, so was causing the issue. For my truck, there is a rod which the caliper attaches to. This rod had rusted and was not allowing free movement. This caused the brake pad to wear unevenly and cause the ...


1

If you are talking about the barely audible noise which occurs about 1/2 way through the video. You are slowly bringing the RPMs up past 1000. When you get it just above 1000 (probably like 1050), I hear a slight noise. This noise sounds like some kind of resonance whistle coming from the intake tract. To test this theory, take your air cleaner out and ...


1

There are two main things which are probably causing you the noise. First is the engine noise. Diesels can put out an extensive amount of noise. This radiates into the cab of the vehicle. You basically have a big box on wheels which focuses and reverberates the sound around inside causing it to amplify somewhat. This makes for a little more noise than what ...


1

Is the noise level comparable to the one on new Ford Transit? Extra torque from the diesel could have torn the motor mounts. I would visually inspect them to see if they need to be replaced or even upgraded.


1

With the lack of information you've (haven't) provided, there is only one thing which I can think of which might be causing the noise you are describing, and that is if the main bearing in the front of the transmission is going out. When you push in the clutch pedal, the transmission is disconnected from the engine and is therefor not turning. When the ...


1

This could be one of several things: Swaybar links broken or missing Worn out strut/shock mount (on either end) Worn out suspension parts ... anywhere the suspension has a bushing which meets the car itself Without being there in person, it's hard to tell beyond that what it might be. I mean, it could also be a loose spare in the trunk area.


1

The standard test for a wheel bearing goes something like this: Jack up the appropriate end/corner of the car and support it on axle-stands Grasp the wheel firmly at top and bottom and try to shake it - there should be a tiny amount of movement, any more is suspect. Repeat step 2 for side-to-side Spin the wheel and listen for any unusual noise, or ...


1

tl;dr The sound is probably caused by your brakes, most likely worn brake pads. Firstly, you would only hear "tyre squeal" if the vehicle is losing (or at least scrabbling for) grip during the braking period. If that's the case, you will know it's the tyres! That takes a lot of braking force, and not likely something that will happen casually. So, I ...


1

It is probably going to be one of your pulley wheels, but I doubt it's the pump. If it's brand new, they usually don't make any noise at all. It is either going to be one of either the idler or tensioner pulleys. And if you don't know which one is which, if you eliminate all of the other pulleys which have things attached to them, you should have one ...


1

It sounds as though your serpentine belt is the issue. The serpentine belt is connected to each pulley (a pulley is the circular disc that the rubber belt travels over) of various engine components (power steering, AC, turbocharger if you have one, etc) and as such has a lot of tension on it, but can't have too much. It may be that the dealer installed a ...


1

There is no way, to my way of thinking, this could be the bearings in the engine. There is absolutely no way you could get any type of penetrating oil into the bearing area of the engine using any type of spray means. These areas are sealed against outside contamination by means of a seal and oil pressure (meaning, if the seal starts to fail, you'd see oil ...


1

Various Nissan models, and other vehicles, have an Extra Air Pump (EAP). When the engine is first started from cold the oxygen sensors are running cold and not up to operating temperature. To control any emissions whilst cold an EAP runs to pump air into the exhaust to help clean it up until the oxygen sensors are fully working, you may have a noisy pump. ...



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