Hot answers tagged

3

Tires heat up quickly during the first bit of driving. The heating tends to soften the rubber which changes how it contacts the road surface. How the tread blocks contact the road changes the sounds produced. Tires vary greatly in design and materials which both affect the noise produced. Name brand expensive tires are carefully engineered to make a "white ...


3

It's your valves or the cam chain If you have a ticking sound, those are your two options. You haven't provided much data or info at all. Adjust your valves .004 inch clearance for your intake valves .005 inch clearance for you exhaust valves OR Check your cam chain tensioner to ensure it's putting the proper tension on your cam chain.


2

I would suggest you check your brakes first. This is usually a main suspect in loud noises if all other aspects are fine. Then it would also benefit you get a suspension check done at a tire fitment centre. They would be able to tell you if it something more complex such as ball joints, CV's, steering rack bushes giving in or any other part behaving ...


2

From HandyHowie's comment above, it could be the start pinion rattling against the flywheel under certain conditions (deceleration as you described). This interference could be cause by improperly placed starter mounting bolts/brackets, or bolts that were not fully torqued, allowing the starter to move. Drivelines have small tolerances of flexibility, which ...


2

Pre-ignition , maybe. What octane gasoline is it supposed to take, and what are you putting in it? Pre-ignition generally ticks when you put the engine under load, especially going up a hill, or "putting your foot" in the gas pedal. If the car is supposed to be run with 91 or 93 octane fuel, and you're using 87 that could cause pre-ignition and a ticking ...


2

It seems to me like something is scraping or rubbing on the brake disc. Is there any chance the emergency brake is slightly engaged? I would suggest jacking the wheels of the ground and spinning them to see if you can pinpoint the sound. It may be something stuck next to the brake pad (which wouldn't necessarily get louder when the brakes are applied), or ...


2

Not necessarily a bad suspension. I am not going to claim it is one specific thing because there are so many things it could be. Here are a few things to check in the rear of the car to find out what is going in; Check the obvious suspension parts as best you can while it is on the ground and while jacked up. Could be shocks, sway bar components, ...


2

There are several things that could be causing the knocking sound from the rear suspension. My first guess was worn out bushings allowing metal-to-metal contact, broken sway bar end-links, or worn out shock mounts (top or bottom). If you can, pop the rear tire off and inspect the suspension mounts for cracked rubber or worn out parts. If there are multiple ...


1

As I mentioned in the comments, you can try looking down the vent with a flashlight to see if the object is visible. On the off chance the object is made of ferrous material, you can get a telescoping magnetic grabber tool for fairly cheap at a hardware store and try sticking it down the vent. There are also small claw style grabbers if the magnet doesn't ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible