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10

The main cause of a squeaky belt is the rubber has stretched causing a reduction in friction allowing the slippage to occur. There are two ways to solve the problem: Tighten the belt by using the appropriate tensioning technique (generally loosening the bolt that hold the pulleys in position, realigning the now-loosened pulley & retightening the ...


7

Your AC drain may be stopped up. Your AC evaporator condenses water when the warm moist air passes over it, this happens in the normal operation of the AC. There is a drain that is suppose to drain the water outside the car, when it gets stopped up water collects in the evaporator case under the dash, it will eventually drain somewhere, most likely on your ...


7

Yes, at least half of the exhaust is coming straight out of that gap without passing through the muffler. As you've noted, this leads to an increase in noise (or music, depending on your taste). To my eye, that looks like a hassle to fix on your own. There appears to be the rusted remnants of two bolts holding the Y-pipe to the passenger side muffler and ...


6

It shouldn't be possible for gravel to get caught in the brake itself, but it could get caught in the brake caliper mounting bracket(s) or between the brake caliper and the wheel, the latter especially if you've installed bigger brakes or different-sized wheels. To be certain: look for scoring or other damage to your braking surfaces — that is, to your ...


6

You might be interested in this question: What are the audible symptoms of a failing starter motor? The diagnosis in that question and answer period was that I probably had an aging starter motor (correct).


6

It sounds like your alternator has not been tightened enough and the serpentine belt is slipping because of it. Since you have new belts on your engine, this is probably about the only thing which it can be. If you press on the belt with your thumb at the center of the long portion of the belt (between pulleys), you should get no more than about 1/2" inch of ...


5

It could be the thrust bearing of the clutch that's worn down. It makes a whining noise when the clutch is disengaged and it reguires replacing the clutch and thrust bearing to solve this.


5

Rubber tubing is a cheap alternative to a stethoscope. You can buy a couple feet of it for a couple dollars at any hardware store, just be careful where you point it. Thank Click & Clack for that, it worked for me.


5

Another way is to jack up (and support) the car, then attempt to shake the wheel. Hold it at top and bottom and try and shake it vertically, then repeat horizontally. There should be very little, if any, play in it. As Dude318is says, a grainy feeling when rotating is another way to tell.


5

Easy way to check is remove each wheel, and rotate the disc. If you can remove the disc as well to get closer to the hub that would be even better. If the bearing rotates but not smoothly (i.e. having a sandy/grainy feeling) then that is likely the culprit. This is how I was able to track down a worn rear wheel bearing on my car.


5

The lifespan of a replaced waterpump will vary with quality. You have no way of knowing what type of pump you paid for. Was it a factory new pump, an aftermarket new pump, rebuilt pump or remanufactured pump. Factory pump is an exact replacement of what the car came with High quality new aftermarket pump may include improvements to the original design ...


4

Upon examination it became immediately obvious what the issue was; the front passenger sway bar link had snapped off at the top, losing its head and both top bushings. The clunk was presumably caused by the remnants of the sway bar link (still attached to the lower control arm) impacting the sway bar during turns with bumps or inclines. A replacement sway ...


4

Use an auto repair stethescope or even a long socket extension as a substitute to listen to each pulley when you start the car. If it's truly a bearing issue you'll hear it right away when you find the affected part.


4

Assuming the belt has correct tension and still squeaks it's rare to find anything more than a short term solution, other than replacing it. However, if you really want to give something a try, most industrial suppliers can sell you a can of "belt grip" compound, which is sprayed onto the contact surfaces of the belt and/or pulleys while they're rotating ...


4

That is probably knocking, or premature detonation. It's a little hard on the motor. It's likely that you should be in a lower gear or ease off the throttle whenever you hear it. It is probably normal for that car. Higher octane gas might help, but it's not good for the car to drive in too high a gear.


4

I happen to have the same experience as you when sitting in my 1998 Honda Accord after it has been shut off. The humming sound lasts 5-6 seconds, and it can be 5 to 10 minutes apart. The noise is definitely coming from underneath the car ahead of the rear wheels, not from the engine. I have also noticed that I have never heard the noise in the winter, ...


4

When the steering wheel is at the end of its travel (completely left/right) it is normal that the power steering pump starts making some extra noise At max travel, the steering pump will produce its maximum pressure and will have to work the hardest. This will create a "hissing" type noise. When the fluid level is low, then you will hear the pump moaning ...


4

You most likely have air in the system, I had the same issue with my 99 Blazer. It seemed as no matter how much I bled it it I couldn't get rid of it. Raise the front of the vehicle make sure that the right side is a bit higher than the left. This will ensure that the highest point in the system is the radiator cap. Remove the radiator cap and start the ...


4

Yes, the normal route is to add sound deadening material inside the doors and/or on the floor of the car. A corolla won't have much stock insulation so you should be able to make some good progress in reducing it. This is a common project for people who are installing nice audio systems, so you should be able to find some nice walk-throughs on audio sites. ...


4

As stated, this is most likely a slipping serpentine belt, but there could be other reasons besides moisture on the belt causing this problem. This is especially true if this is happening every day. The problem can also be caused from a weak tensioner pulley (the part which keeps the belt tight). I know this is unlikely, considering it's a new vehicle, but ...


3

William Cline has a point. When I worked at BMW, it was common for customers to have small pebbles caught in between the inboard side of the rotor and the dust shield. This would grind until the pebble wore out, or it was removed. Often the rotor would experience slight wear from the rubbing, but nothing to crazy.


3

First, I think you're changing gear way to early if you're changing up from 3rd to 4th at 2000rpm, especially when the engine is under load. There's a reason the redline is higher than that :). You're not really doing yourself a favour with that, and neither are you doing the engine a favour. Knock or pinging is usually caused by the fuel burning ...


3

It could be incorrectly torqued wheels, loose disc brake calipers, brake pad shims, suspension pieces loading/unloading from the weight shift. If they just did the tires, take it back and tell them to take a look (for free). Try slowing the car down with the engine. If it's manual, just downshift. If it is automatic, shift the selector to one of the lower ...


3

My experience (in multiple cars, albeit not your make/model) has been that this sound always means your cooling system is under-filled. If you've emptied your cooling system and refilled it, it can be really hard to get all the air pockets out of the heater core, especially since in many vehicles it's almost as high as the radiator cap and at the opposite ...


3

One cause of pops is unburnt fuel hitting the exhaust manifold - many engines use fuel to cool the cylinder when you lift off, so this sprayed excess then burns as it hits hot metal in the exhaust. The burble on overrun is usually caused by ignition timing being retarded. Aside from those, any valve or gasket leaks could also cause pops.


3

That does sound very likely - it could be bearings, or as the volume increases when the wheel is turned it may be the universal joint. Get your car propped up securely and spin the front wheels by hand. You may be able to hear or even feel whereabouts the problem is. In any case, your local garage will be able to diagnose this very quickly and easily.


3

If you don't properly break in your pads/shoes then the squeal will likely just come right back. You have to avoid hard or excessive braking for at least 50km after doing a change like that. However, your calipers could be bad and cause your pads to not seat properly or warp the rotors causing noise.


3

A clicking sound on acceleration especially while turning is most commonly caused by a CV (constant velocity) joint. A CV joint transmits power from the engine to the drive wheels. If you look under the car behind the front wheel you will see a black rubber cone around each end of the axle. This is the boot or cover for the CV joint. Many times the joint ...


3

The parking brake may not be releasing on that wheel. The parking brake cable may be damaged or rusted. Its also possible that the hydraulic cylinder in the brake caliper is stuck. Another possibility is the caliper pins which allow the caliper to stay centered over the rotor are corroded. You should inspect the parking brake cabling to ensure smooth ...


3

From your question, the whine is linked into braking both when the veicle is stopped or moving. I would first look at the brake servo, its hoses and valves. A vacuum leak can give a whining like noise.



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