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12

It sounds like your alternator has not been tightened enough and the serpentine belt is slipping because of it. Since you have new belts on your engine, this is probably about the only thing which it can be. If you press on the belt with your thumb at the center of the long portion of the belt (between pulleys), you should get no more than about 1/2" inch of ...


11

Yes, at least half of the exhaust is coming straight out of that gap without passing through the muffler. As you've noted, this leads to an increase in noise (or music, depending on your taste). To my eye, that looks like a hassle to fix on your own. There appears to be the rusted remnants of two bolts holding the Y-pipe to the passenger side muffler and ...


10

The main cause of a squeaky belt is the rubber has stretched causing a reduction in friction allowing the slippage to occur. There are two ways to solve the problem: Tighten the belt by using the appropriate tensioning technique (generally loosening the bolt that hold the pulleys in position, realigning the now-loosened pulley & retightening the ...


10

It is the sound of the fuel pump priming and pressurizing the fuel lines, which is absolutely normal. VW likes to use the opening of the driver door to trigger fuel rail pressurization. In fact, one could use the absence of the sound of the fuel pump as a tell-tale sign that the fuel pump relay is not functioning properly. As @Paulster2 points out, either ...


9

Easy way to check is remove each wheel, and rotate the disc. If you can remove the disc as well to get closer to the hub that would be even better. If the bearing rotates but not smoothly (i.e. having a sandy/grainy feeling) then that is likely the culprit. This is how I was able to track down a worn rear wheel bearing on my car.


9

Your AC drain may be stopped up. Your AC evaporator condenses water when the warm moist air passes over it, this happens in the normal operation of the AC. There is a drain that is suppose to drain the water outside the car, when it gets stopped up water collects in the evaporator case under the dash, it will eventually drain somewhere, most likely on your ...


8

Most of the time a ground loop is the cause of this problem. This problem is common especially if your stereos speakers are amplified, and can be fixed my making sure that your stereo unit and/or amplifier have a good ground connection. This can be done by either finding a more direct ground connection to the cars frame, sanding the area around your ground ...


8

From personal experience, I'd replaced ALOT of these working at the dealership. It wasn't just the accords either, it was quite a few Honda and Acuras that used the same design and power delivery system. The most common issues I saw out of probably close to 100+ failures of these was: Ground strap on the starter becoming corroded. Bad ground to engine ...


7

Another way is to jack up (and support) the car, then attempt to shake the wheel. Hold it at top and bottom and try and shake it vertically, then repeat horizontally. There should be very little, if any, play in it. As Dude318is says, a grainy feeling when rotating is another way to tell.


7

Diagnosing noises when you're thousands of miles away isn't going to be easy, but here are a few tips to help you out: remove the serpentine belt and run the engine If the noise stops, you know that the noise source is something that is running off the serpentine. inspect the belt for loss of tension Loose belts are notorious for squealing spin the ...


6

It shouldn't be possible for gravel to get caught in the brake itself, but it could get caught in the brake caliper mounting bracket(s) or between the brake caliper and the wheel, the latter especially if you've installed bigger brakes or different-sized wheels. To be certain: look for scoring or other damage to your braking surfaces — that is, to your ...


6

You might be interested in this question: What are the audible symptoms of a failing starter motor? The diagnosis in that question and answer period was that I probably had an aging starter motor (correct).


6

It turns out that the brake pads were improperly installed. Furthermore, the problem seemed to occur far more often when the breaks were wet. I;m not sure if that caused the pads to "slip" more or what.


5

Assuming the belt has correct tension and still squeaks it's rare to find anything more than a short term solution, other than replacing it. However, if you really want to give something a try, most industrial suppliers can sell you a can of "belt grip" compound, which is sprayed onto the contact surfaces of the belt and/or pulleys while they're rotating ...


5

It could be the thrust bearing of the clutch that's worn down. It makes a whining noise when the clutch is disengaged and it reguires replacing the clutch and thrust bearing to solve this.


5

Rubber tubing is a cheap alternative to a stethoscope. You can buy a couple feet of it for a couple dollars at any hardware store, just be careful where you point it. Thank Click & Clack for that, it worked for me.


5

I happen to have the same experience as you when sitting in my 1998 Honda Accord after it has been shut off. The humming sound lasts 5-6 seconds, and it can be 5 to 10 minutes apart. The noise is definitely coming from underneath the car ahead of the rear wheels, not from the engine. I have also noticed that I have never heard the noise in the winter, ...


5

It could be incorrectly torqued wheels, loose disc brake calipers, brake pad shims, suspension pieces loading/unloading from the weight shift. If they just did the tires, take it back and tell them to take a look (for free). Try slowing the car down with the engine. If it's manual, just downshift. If it is automatic, shift the selector to one of the lower ...


5

The lifespan of a replaced waterpump will vary with quality. You have no way of knowing what type of pump you paid for. Was it a factory new pump, an aftermarket new pump, rebuilt pump or remanufactured pump. Factory pump is an exact replacement of what the car came with High quality new aftermarket pump may include improvements to the original design ...


5

As stated, this is most likely a slipping serpentine belt, but there could be other reasons besides moisture on the belt causing this problem. This is especially true if this is happening every day. The problem can also be caused from a weak tensioner pulley (the part which keeps the belt tight). I know this is unlikely, considering it's a new vehicle, but ...


5

Unidirectional tires should NOT be cross rotated. "Uni" implies one, as in one direction (nothing to do with singing). Radials in general should not be cross rotated. They start behaving as you have discribed, with the noise and all. With all this said, I don't believe your tires are unidirectional, but again, once radials have been driven for a period of ...


5

Your problem could be caused by two things. A shitty car charger, they are not all created equal, or a ground loop. As far as the charger goes try several different ones, name brand ones tend to be the best (htc, iphone, samsung, etc...). If the problem goes away then it was the charger. As far as a ground loop, what happens is that the ground potential ...


5

It sounds like a valve adjustment is required There are many items that can make a 'ticking' noise that is tied to the RPM of the vehicle. Having the sound match RPM's certainly gives a clue that it is associated with the operation of the engine. Many times a valve adjustment is required. This is a component of a regular maintenance schedule for almost ...


4

Use an auto repair stethescope or even a long socket extension as a substitute to listen to each pulley when you start the car. If it's truly a bearing issue you'll hear it right away when you find the affected part.


4

Claptrap is on the money with grease points, but many modern cars don't have them, and I can't speak to how the Wrangler is setup. That is the perfect starting point, though. The next step would be to spray down all the rubber mounting points (suspension bushings, shock mounts, etc) with white lithium grease to see if that quiets it down at all. I fear ...


4

Upon examination it became immediately obvious what the issue was; the front passenger sway bar link had snapped off at the top, losing its head and both top bushings. The clunk was presumably caused by the remnants of the sway bar link (still attached to the lower control arm) impacting the sway bar during turns with bumps or inclines. A replacement sway ...


4

That is probably knocking, or premature detonation. It's a little hard on the motor. It's likely that you should be in a lower gear or ease off the throttle whenever you hear it. It is probably normal for that car. Higher octane gas might help, but it's not good for the car to drive in too high a gear.


4

For anyone who has similar issues I had a similar issue however I don't think it was exactly same. I tried the steps in the accepted answer with no success. Research on my own I tried different phones and noticed that some would have the static at low volumes and other would not. I looked online and sometimes the phone can cause this to happen. How I ...


4

When the steering wheel is at the end of its travel (completely left/right) it is normal that the power steering pump starts making some extra noise At max travel, the steering pump will produce its maximum pressure and will have to work the hardest. This will create a "hissing" type noise. When the fluid level is low, then you will hear the pump moaning ...


4

I would imagine that if it was binding of the strut and it's seat causing the noise then the you would notice a few things in other characteristics of the ride. I say this What kind of car is this? (year / make / model / engine) How did you determine that the noise was coming in fact from the strut assemblies? Was the rest of the front suspension ...



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