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6

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


5

If you don't want to weld, you can use a joint like this: NOTE: The above image is for demonstration purposes only. I couldn't readily find one which was 2" on each side. The only difference is, the inside diameter on both ends would be 2". Your outside diameter 2" pipes would fit inside. Use two muffler clamps to attach. You'll need to match the outside ...


3

While I can't provide the technical details as to why, I would say your weedeater is performing as expected. With full choke and full throttle, you are flooding it when the muffler is attached. I would expect that you would smell or even see fuel coming out of the exhaust. However, with the muffler removed, the backpressure is so low that the engine can blow ...


2

The auto parts store can probably rent you a pipe expander. Once you get the pipes apart you can use the pipe expander to change the diameter of the pipes. Be sure not to rip one from expanding it too much!


1

This is a very subjective question in what do you mean by noticeable? It also depends on the size of the resonator itself. The general answer would be, no, it won't. Most mufflers have fiberglass matting in them which absorbs the sound which flows into the muffler. The dents usually won't affect this. The only time it would is if the muffler is completely ...


1

Your specific link says Inlet: 2" (which is one dimension you look for) and it includes Universal Fitting kit (50cm Flexi pipe, Reducer, Clamp and Strap). This means you probably wouldn't need to weld anything. It also says it fits your car. General Advice Look for inlet diameter, outlet diameter, dimensions of muffler, and position of inlet and outlet ...


1

What I did was I cleaned out the muffler with brake cleaner then blew it out with my air compressor (didn't really do much, I didn't see much carbon buildup come out). I put the muffler back on, dumped out the E10 gas that I had in the tank, replaced it with 100% gas, and now it works. Not sure which of these steps ultimately fixed it.


1

I believe that the OEM muffler for the Honda Civic is only aluminized steel, not stainless steel. As such, it doesn't even have the higher resistance to rust that a stainless part will have. As noted previously, a stainless part is only resistant to corrosion, not immune (nothing really is). If you choose to go with an aftermarket stainless part, you can ...


1

Stainless steel is merely corrosion resistant, not corrosion proof, and some are better than others. My 1991 Toyota with 251,000 miles (including daily driving in the rust belt Winters) is still on its original exhaust (getting rusty, but no leaks/holes). My 1995 Mitsubishi with only 116,000 miles, rarely Winter driven is already on its third. This time ...


1

Most of the model specific nature of an exhaust system is not the muffler itself but the piping and how it attaches to the underneath of the car. It has to be sized and bent properly to work its way through from the front to back. If you are just wanting to replace the muffler and tip, you should be able to purchase those parts individually and get a shop ...



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