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5

They want you to back of the lash so you don't ruin your rocker arms The system in which this head depresses the valves is the reverse of many heads. The cams (the shaft at the top of the photo) is spinning with the lobe coming up beneath the rocker arm foot to act as a lever against the rocker shafts (short shafts between the cam and the valves) to ...


5

You want to back off the valves so you don't damage the head when you pull the head bolts. If you have tension on the valves, you run the risk of warping the head. Likewise, when you put the head on, you want to ensure there aren't any valves which will be causing interference. If there is interference from the valves, this will affect the torque values ...


5

You know there's low oil, and then there's low oil. I gotta tell you a story, its how I got started in automotive stuff. So I was living in Germany as an American G.I. I got interested in cars as a hobby. A friend of mine had crashed his car into a curb at high speed, and the insurance company called it a total loss. He wanted $300 for it. I wanted ...


10

Carburetor Circuits Will Still Pull Fuel from the System If the engine is running on a carbureted vehicle, off throttle or not, it will consume fuel. Throttle Settings There are three basic circuits in a most carburetors that provide fuel to the ICE. Idle Circuit - effects fuel metering at low RPM conditions where the throttle plate is closed. Secondary ...


14

At a base level, carburetors meter the amount of fuel they let into the engine by the amount of air that is moving through them. Vacuum is created by the piston moving in the engine and creating an open space. As the piston moves down, it creates an empty volume which pulls in air through the only opening it can find, which is the passageway through the ...


15

Carburettors are very crude in comparison to EFI systems, and so the amount of fuel entering the engine is simply a factor of the amount of air going in, which is controlled by the position of the butterfly (and hence by the throttle position). At a completely closed throttle, there will therefore still be some fuel getting in, enough to keep the engine ...



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