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3

Instead of recreating the wheel, here are some pretty good reasons why you need to do a break-in on any engine, be it a motorcycle or a car. I found it on this page. I don't necessarily agree with everything the person says on the page, so I'll leave the rest of the reading up to you. The What: Every new engine has internal components that must be ...


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As far as the numbers, use what your vehicle manufacturer recommends. There is a reason your manufacturer recommends a viscosity, the main reason is, the engine is built a certain way and needs that viscosity. If you put a heavier weight oil in the engine than what is called for, your engine will not get the oil in a quantity it needs, nor in places it needs ...


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Paulster2's comment on your post is absolutely correct. The difference between diesel and petrol is so huge, it completely overshadows the differences between cars in various regions. That said, there is historical precedence for different typical power/fuel consumption figures in these regions. The US has long had very cheap fuel, cheap land and extensive ...


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This is all explained on the Government website for the MOT. The leaflets are kept up to date at legislation changes. Whether an individual test centre will fix minor faults like tyre pressure is down to the centre.


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If when you shift gear and release the clutch you feel the engine reving up without the car actually accelerating, probably the clutch is worn or very old/used. (this goes for manual gearbox)


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If I am understanding what you are trying to say, it sounds like the transmission is slipping and allowing the engine to rev higher than what you'd expect for the speed you are going. Not knowing if it is an automatic or standard gearbox, I'm going to assume it is auto, because I don't think Volvo made too many standard shift 4-doors. Something you need to ...


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Don't worry about the motor, worry about the ignition system. I take it you must be using an HEI distributor in the vehicle to warrant a .060" gap. Be aware that GM reduced this to .045" gap due to longevity issues. If it's not an HEI, I believe the .035" is correct. If you are running the same ignition you were using before the swap, gap it as you had it ...


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(NOTE: This answer is predicated upon your engine being a 5S-FE I4 found in many Camrys.) Does this situation cause such engine damage? No. Since your engine is a non-interference motor, it should not suffer damage due to this type of an issue. There may be other things going on, though, which may be the root of what your mechanic is saying is going ...


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The MOT only checks a specific set of things, as described in the link in Chenmunka's answer. Tyre pressure isn't one of them, but tyre condition and tread depth are. Some MOT stations (usually the smaller ones) will fix minor things as they go, big ones won't as they can charge you extra to do things afterwards! However - it is your responsibility (by law) ...


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As the previous answer stated, always use the oil specified in the owners manual for your vehicle based on temperature. As for the numbers and what they mean, the numbers are the "viscosity" of the oil. Viscosity refers to the thickness of the oil, lower numbers are thinner, higher numbers are thicker. More appropriately the viscosity number is the amount ...


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Look in this Car and Driver article from March of this year. You'll notice what the number one mileage car on the road today is (other than hybrids/electric) ... That's right, an AMERICAN Chevrolet Cruze at 46mpg (or ~20km/l). This beats out Japanese and European cars alike. You'll notice the Cruze has a 2l diesel engine, like the "average European" car you ...


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It is a carburetor problem, but only because the fuel and air mixture is too lean. In cold environment there is more oxygen in the air, which increases the amount of "air" in the air-fuel mixture. This is further proven by the fact you have to accelerate to keep the bike alive - by accelerating you use parts of the carb only used in medium/high openings, ...


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I think you need a new stator. Your problem sounds like there are loose connections or there may be reason that the bike is not charging properly. I think you start checking all the basics first and check the battery to make sure it is good. Check the volts on your battery with voltmeter.



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