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22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


21

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


20

The "take some of the output force to reuse it as input" can be interpreted as regenerative braking, but the big differences are: Regenerative braking takes power back from the wheels while turbo take power from the engine itself, that would be otherwise wasted. The power of the turbo adds to the normal power of the engine while the power of regenerative ...


17

regenerative braking This question and answer regarding the subject matter has some very good information in it as well the answer reveals a mathematical paradox with regenerative braking What is regenerative braking and why don't we use it? This Q&A is a bit off your topic but has breadcrumbs regarding recapturing lost energy through a turbo to ...


16

No, there isn't any equivalent. A turbo is used because combustion engines are inherently inefficient: they convert chemical energy into mechanical energy, using an awkward detour via heat. Unfortunately, heat is pretty much the worst possible way to store energy: by the laws of thermodynamics, you can only convert it to other forms of energy if you also ...


15

At a base level, carburetors meter the amount of fuel they let into the engine by the amount of air that is moving through them. Vacuum is created by the piston moving in the engine and creating an open space. As the piston moves down, it creates an empty volume which pulls in air through the only opening it can find, which is the passageway through the ...


15

Carburettors are very crude in comparison to EFI systems, and so the amount of fuel entering the engine is simply a factor of the amount of air going in, which is controlled by the position of the butterfly (and hence by the throttle position). At a completely closed throttle, there will therefore still be some fuel getting in, enough to keep the engine ...


10

Carburetor Circuits Will Still Pull Fuel from the System If the engine is running on a carbureted vehicle, off throttle or not, it will consume fuel. Throttle Settings There are three basic circuits in a most carburetors that provide fuel to the ICE. Idle Circuit - effects fuel metering at low RPM conditions where the throttle plate is closed. Secondary ...


10

Yes, it's possible some of the seals designed to withstand water and glycol could get damaged I am thinking you are creating a fictitious scenario here, so I'll roll with it. If you filled your radiator with oil and started your car and let it run for awhile I would be most concerned with damage to seals that were designed to withstand water and glycol. ...


9

It can absolutely be started without a radiator. You will not cause any damage as long as the engine does not overheat. If you don't run it long enough for the engine to get too hot, it's not an issue. To give you an example of how it could be beneficial: I used to own a 94 Camaro Z28. The engine in it was a Gen-II LT1 350. This engine has what's called an ...


9

An engine is a very large thermal mass. When the engine is cold it takes time to warm up. If you only run the engine for 15 to 30 seconds from cold there should be no problem. Running the engine any longer than that may cause the engine to overheat.


5

Bushings are used to hold the ends of the motor shaft aligned. The motor shaft goes into the bushing and spins inside of it. You can see the bushing and the shaft in this image and get a good idea of how it works:


5

They want you to back of the lash so you don't ruin your rocker arms The system in which this head depresses the valves is the reverse of many heads. The cams (the shaft at the top of the photo) is spinning with the lobe coming up beneath the rocker arm foot to act as a lever against the rocker shafts (short shafts between the cam and the valves) to ...


5

You want to back off the valves so you don't damage the head when you pull the head bolts. If you have tension on the valves, you run the risk of warping the head. Likewise, when you put the head on, you want to ensure there aren't any valves which will be causing interference. If there is interference from the valves, this will affect the torque values ...


5

You know there's low oil, and then there's low oil. I gotta tell you a story, its how I got started in automotive stuff. So I was living in Germany as an American G.I. I got interested in cars as a hobby. A friend of mine had crashed his car into a curb at high speed, and the insurance company called it a total loss. He wanted $300 for it. I wanted ...


4

You could capture the heat from the electric motor, and convert that into more energy using a thermoelectric device. University of Florida research


3

Some people call plain bearings bushings The etymology can be different based upon geography. If you have a 'bushing' in your engine it can commonly refer to a crankshaft plain bearing or a connecting rod plan bearing. Here is the wiki on 'bushing'. A plain bearing that is missing out of an engine would be unusual. To remove a crankshaft plain bearing ...


3

Strange - engine coolant is antifreeze diluted with water. So the seller is claiming he had oil but not water? I would not buy that car. For the seller, a coolant system flush would in order, both forwards and reverse, and then refill with antifreeze and clean water. If engine oil still appears in the coolant water then the oil is moving from the oil ...


3

There are two answers to this question: Theoretically, radiators are completely optional on engines. Air cooled engines have existed for a very long time. The function of the radiator on these engines is replaced by cooling fins to extract the heat and release it into the air, and they also have oil coolers as well to carry out the heat. However, if your ...


2

To answer my own question: I contacted another mechanic with this issue who fixed it in no time. I feel quite stupid now... The problem was indeed with the fuel line. The fuel line was clogged with some bits of grass that had fallen in during refilling. But it was clogged in such a "creative" way that the fuel pump was able to pull some fuel through it ...


2

Only based on your question. The answer is yes. You can run an engine without radiator. You just need to find an alternative way of keeping it coolor you will end breaking it. It's not immediate, but once the engine warms too much it will break. There are many engines that were develop specifically with this purpose in mind and only use the air flow to keep ...


2

There are some good answers here already that pretty much entirely cover the topic. One thing that wasn't mentioned however is KERS - kinetic energy recovery systems. Effectively you have a large mass (flywheel) that spins up as the vehicle is in motion. Generally under brakes or vac (no throttle) the driveline feeds energy into this flywheel. When needed, ...


2

I'm afraid the only answer I can offer on a Global forum is "Whatever the local traffic regulations stipulate".


1

Most Electric traction systems Buck down the voltage that goes to the electric motor from the battery .For example a 48V electric cart motor controller will give the motor Up to 48V but no more .Summarising and boiling down electric motor theory for this stack voltage is speed and current is torque .The jargon term TURBO is used when ...


1

As oil has a higher viscosity than water, I think it could damage the water pump because it would put more stress on it. Also, the oil would flow slower than water and this could lead to overheating of the engine.


1

Have into account two factors: oil viscosity may be much or very much higher than the antifreeze fluid (glicol-polipropylene derivates) normally used: the radiator grille has capilare-thickness tubes and an hydraulic circuit (pump, filter, reservoir...) prepared for much less viscosity. Furthermore, the oil will becoming more and more viscose while the ...


1

I consider it quite more likely that it was the engine that had been putting oil into the coolant. Of course, it may also be that the seller poured some obvious additional oil on top in order to mask the defective motor seal, a very expensive defect to fix.


1

This sounds like a defective fuel cap. This is a problem with the LX288 / 277 the vent hole clogs and you get a vacuum lock situation. Replace that cap! Also, less likely is sticking valves, which occur when the engine gets hot. Again a known problem with the FH500V engine.


1

The block off plate replaces the plate which allows an air pump to pump air into the system to allow for better burn of the exhaust gasses (any fuel which may not have been burnt during the combustion process). Here is what the Graves Motorsports web page has to say about it: The air induction system (AIS) burns unburned exhaust gases by injecting ...


1

The simplest way to check is to fit a new timing belt, turn the engine over by hand and make sure it feels free and isn't making any odd noises. Then do a compression test and see if it's still got compression. If that all checks out then you should be okay to try and start it. If not, the only option to you is to pop the cylinder head off and take a look ...



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