Hot answers tagged

22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


21

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


20

The "take some of the output force to reuse it as input" can be interpreted as regenerative braking, but the big differences are: Regenerative braking takes power back from the wheels while turbo take power from the engine itself, that would be otherwise wasted. The power of the turbo adds to the normal power of the engine while the power of regenerative ...


17

regenerative braking This question and answer regarding the subject matter has some very good information in it as well the answer reveals a mathematical paradox with regenerative braking What is regenerative braking and why don't we use it? This Q&A is a bit off your topic but has breadcrumbs regarding recapturing lost energy through a turbo to ...


16

No, there isn't any equivalent. A turbo is used because combustion engines are inherently inefficient: they convert chemical energy into mechanical energy, using an awkward detour via heat. Unfortunately, heat is pretty much the worst possible way to store energy: by the laws of thermodynamics, you can only convert it to other forms of energy if you also ...


15

Carburettors are very crude in comparison to EFI systems, and so the amount of fuel entering the engine is simply a factor of the amount of air going in, which is controlled by the position of the butterfly (and hence by the throttle position). At a completely closed throttle, there will therefore still be some fuel getting in, enough to keep the engine ...


15

At a base level, carburetors meter the amount of fuel they let into the engine by the amount of air that is moving through them. Vacuum is created by the piston moving in the engine and creating an open space. As the piston moves down, it creates an empty volume which pulls in air through the only opening it can find, which is the passageway through the ...


10

Yes, it's possible some of the seals designed to withstand water and glycol could get damaged I am thinking you are creating a fictitious scenario here, so I'll roll with it. If you filled your radiator with oil and started your car and let it run for awhile I would be most concerned with damage to seals that were designed to withstand water and glycol. ...


10

Carburetor Circuits Will Still Pull Fuel from the System If the engine is running on a carbureted vehicle, off throttle or not, it will consume fuel. Throttle Settings There are three basic circuits in a most carburetors that provide fuel to the ICE. Idle Circuit - effects fuel metering at low RPM conditions where the throttle plate is closed. Secondary ...


9

It can absolutely be started without a radiator. You will not cause any damage as long as the engine does not overheat. If you don't run it long enough for the engine to get too hot, it's not an issue. To give you an example of how it could be beneficial: I used to own a 94 Camaro Z28. The engine in it was a Gen-II LT1 350. This engine has what's called an ...


9

An engine is a very large thermal mass. When the engine is cold it takes time to warm up. If you only run the engine for 15 to 30 seconds from cold there should be no problem. Running the engine any longer than that may cause the engine to overheat.


7

Of course it's possible, but in an ideal electric car, you don't even need a transmission with multiple gears. The electric motor has a much greater range of torque/speed output at its disposal than an internal combustion engine does.


6

If you are able to get your hands on it be sure to do a compression test on it. If the compression is bad you will need to basically do a rebuild which will cost quite a bit more than what I am guessing you want to spend. Check the condition of the timing belt, good way to see if the engine was taken care of. That's all I can think of right now but of ...


5

As far as the numbers, use what your vehicle manufacturer recommends. There is a reason your manufacturer recommends a viscosity, the main reason is, the engine is built a certain way and needs that viscosity. If you put a heavier weight oil in the engine than what is called for, your engine will not get the oil in a quantity it needs, nor in places it needs ...


5

If you have checked another working window, your best bet is to use a multimeter to see which wire carries what voltage for the up and down signals (this is not specific to your cart but relevant for any). Then check first to see whether the voltage is present at the motor end of the wire. If so, the connection to the motor may be faulty. If no voltage ...


5

You know there's low oil, and then there's low oil. I gotta tell you a story, its how I got started in automotive stuff. So I was living in Germany as an American G.I. I got interested in cars as a hobby. A friend of mine had crashed his car into a curb at high speed, and the insurance company called it a total loss. He wanted $300 for it. I wanted ...


5

You want to back off the valves so you don't damage the head when you pull the head bolts. If you have tension on the valves, you run the risk of warping the head. Likewise, when you put the head on, you want to ensure there aren't any valves which will be causing interference. If there is interference from the valves, this will affect the torque values ...


5

They want you to back of the lash so you don't ruin your rocker arms The system in which this head depresses the valves is the reverse of many heads. The cams (the shaft at the top of the photo) is spinning with the lobe coming up beneath the rocker arm foot to act as a lever against the rocker shafts (short shafts between the cam and the valves) to ...


5

Bushings are used to hold the ends of the motor shaft aligned. The motor shaft goes into the bushing and spins inside of it. You can see the bushing and the shaft in this image and get a good idea of how it works:


4

I have only done this once, but I had incredibly good luck with it. In my case, it was a '86 Subaru GL-10, also turbo. I'm sure some will apply and some won't... Check the sources warranties, some will say they're compression tested and what the different readings were, some will offer warranties, etc... The engine I got was in extremely good shape, and ...


4

Make sure you doublecheck on the laws in your state before you buy any imported engines. I know in California you have basically zero chance of getting a Japanese engine smogged, even if the specs look the same as the US version.


4

This is all explained on the Government website for the MOT. The leaflets are kept up to date at legislation changes. Whether an individual test centre will fix minor faults like tyre pressure is down to the centre.


4

You could capture the heat from the electric motor, and convert that into more energy using a thermoelectric device. University of Florida research


3

Instead of recreating the wheel, here are some pretty good reasons why you need to do a break-in on any engine, be it a motorcycle or a car. I found it on this page. I don't necessarily agree with everything the person says on the page, so I'll leave the rest of the reading up to you. The What: Every new engine has internal components that must be "...


3

The MOT only checks a specific set of things, as described in the link in Chenmunka's answer. Tyre pressure isn't one of them, but tyre condition and tread depth are. Some MOT stations (usually the smaller ones) will fix minor things as they go, big ones won't as they can charge you extra to do things afterwards! However - it is your responsibility (by law) ...


3

Paulster2's comment on your post is absolutely correct. The difference between diesel and petrol is so huge, it completely overshadows the differences between cars in various regions. That said, there is historical precedence for different typical power/fuel consumption figures in these regions. The US has long had very cheap fuel, cheap land and extensive ...


3

If when you shift gear and release the clutch you feel the engine reving up without the car actually accelerating, probably the clutch is worn or very old/used. (this goes for manual gearbox)


3

You never know where used parts come from, unless you remove them, and even then you never know their state. I would suggest a new one, and hopefully from a reputable manufacturer. Also, I rarely saw motors go bad, as it was usually the window regulator that failed and would seize the window. The labor is usually around the same, but motors are about 3 times ...


3

I agree with ursa, if you can get hands on the motor before purchase then I'd pull the plugs and see how they look. Dip the oil in the dip stick and see how the oil looks, whether there is a lot of sludge or shavings or anything. Overall condition of the motor will tell you a lot about how it has been maintained. But the compression test is the best thing to ...


3

If you were to simply replace the existing petrol engine with an electric motor, then yes, it would ruin the gearbox very quickly, as it won't be able to handle that amount of torque. However, even if the transmission would cope, that wouldn't be the best way of doing it - an electric motor has a very different torque curve to an internal combustion engine, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible