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A larger wheel diameter WILL influence the dashboard's readings IF the sensor that reads data is placed on the wheel (like on bicycles, but usually on motorcycles it is placed near the brake), as it calibrated for a certain wheel. If the sensor is placed (very often) on the front sprocket, readings won't be affected.


2

Dirt bikes and enduros do this. Choppers too. Their frames and suspension styles are built around the wheel sizes though. So, unless you are riding a bike that comes "stock" with two different sized wheels, I would not recommend it. On any bike that goes highway speed, you should be especially careful, since you may place more strain on forks or other ...


3

They should be; doing so thoroughly impregnates the surface with oil. If you simply assemble it dry, then oil will have a hard time getting to some of the friction plate surfaces so they'll run dry or nearly dry until the clutch has been used a number of times, and during that interval the clutch is likely to wear much faster than normal.


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In general, if you have access to the battery when the engine is idling you can get a first-step diagnoses of whether the alternator is provided enough output. With the engine running check the battery voltage at, say: Idle (800~1000 RPM) 1500 RPM 2500 RPM You should have roughly 12.5-13.0 volts at idle, and 13.0-13.5 or more at higher RPM. If not then ...


1

Once you have removed rust, use vaseline (yep it's weird but it works :p) every now and then to protect the chrome parts. When you notice the parts starting to get opaque use light abrasive paste on a cloth to make the chrome parts shining again.


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Chrome does not rust, its the steel under the chrome that rusts and flakes off the chrome. In the UK the number one product for chrome is Solvol Autosol. Does what is says on the tube.


5

For rust removal... my personal favorite technique involves a lot of distilled white vinegar and a green "scrunge" (like a 3M scrubbing pad) or a pad of steel wool. By "a lot" of vinegar, I mean never allow the surface to get dry - always keep it wet with vinegar or it'll "flash rust" while you work. This generally involves working only a fairly small area ...


4

One time-honored method is to rub the chromed parts vigorously with alumin(i)um foil. That results in the transfer of alumin(i)um ions to the steel surface, further protecting the surface. WD-40 is a lousy, horrible corrosion prevention agent. If you can get it to last for longer than about 24 hours, you're doing well. It does do some jobs very very well... ...


0

Had the same problem with my bike took it to the local mechanic Turns out the break pads had worn out a lot and needed replacement and the brake piston seal had been overextended so the seal was damaged too


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Pull the plug and clean it, pull the air filter and clean or replace it, with the plug out of the cylinder cycle the motor a few times - as if you're trying to start it - but cover anything you don't want gunk to get on. If there's residual oil in the cylinder this can help flush it out. Of course like the last answers mentioned, your spark plug's gap ...


2

If your bike is sitting for long periods in extreme cold the cover will not help with cold exposure. Wind chill has no effect on inanimate objects. The cover design and material are the biggest factors determining whether or not it is suitable for long term use. As long as the humidity level is fairly low (as it would be in -20 degree temps) the cover won't ...


1

Clutch disengages crankshaft movement from the gearbox. Crankshaft and part of the clutch assembly turn, other part of the clutch assembly, gearbox and wheel do not come along. Neutral gear disengages gears from each other inside the gearbox. Crankshaft, clutch assembly and part of the gearbox move, other part of the gearbox and wheel do not. So the two are ...


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There's a chance the relay needs to be replaced. There's a couple steps you could try beforehand though. Check resistance between all the wires from the light controls to the relay to the light bulb itself. As long as there's zero to very little resistance you know all your wiring is ok. You can clean the contacts. Use some steel wool and/or sandpaper to ...


1

Give your local motorcycle dealership a call. FMF does make replacement cores and these are very likely available from your local FMF dealer. This mfg part number will help you find what you're looking for: 040261 Confirm on their web page: http://www.fmfracing.com/Products/Accessories/334


5

This shall be a lesson to you about winterizing your bike. Let's take it from the top. Drain that nasty ancient gas out of the tank AND out of the carburetor bowl(s). You want it completely gone, all of it. If you're lucky, you'll be able to use "carburetor & fuel injector cleaner" (the fuel additive, NOT the spray) to clean any new varnish out of the ...


1

I would remove the spark plugs and spray some lubricant into the cylinders. Use something like PB Blaster, SeaFoam, Liquid Wrench etc. Allow it to sit overnight. With the bike on the center stand, the ignition in "off", the transmission in gear rotate the back wheel to see if the motor will turn over. You should see some of the oil being pushed out of the ...


0

It is a carburetor problem, but only because the fuel and air mixture is too lean. In cold environment there is more oxygen in the air, which increases the amount of "air" in the air-fuel mixture. This is further proven by the fact you have to accelerate to keep the bike alive - by accelerating you use parts of the carb only used in medium/high openings, ...


0

I think you need a new stator. Your problem sounds like there are loose connections or there may be reason that the bike is not charging properly. I think you start checking all the basics first and check the battery to make sure it is good. Check the volts on your battery with voltmeter.


0

I think that because or corrosion and stick together of some parts. Knocking could help to release you clutch. Some other parts, like carburetor need to be cleaned. Fresh fuel, new plug, start help spray.


1

I'm pretty sure what is used is just mileage calculation to figure out how many miles are left in a tank of gas. Other than that, you pop the cap off, look down the hole and see how much fuel is in the tank. Once you have been riding the bike for a while, you'll know just how far a tank of gas will carry you and also be able to tell by the slosh in the tank ...


0

Have you considered a dual tank for the machine. When I was riding my BSA C12 many years ago, some machines, not mine, had a tap on the tank to switch between a reserve tank and a main tank. The reserve tank was inside the main tank. Me-I relied on taking the filler cap off and looking inside before/during a trip.


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I would not do that. To do the real one is a lot of work to do. Open the tank, find the swimmer, do and seal a hole, find modules to regulate the swimmer and then the right fuel meter. It's also pretty danger. Maybe you will find an other tank with a fuel meter in it and right module for it.


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You did gap that plug correctly, right? According to the manufacturer, at least? If you're not sure, pull it back out & regap it.


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Peter's on it, all the way across the board. If all those checks test out, then check for a sticky valve on that one cylinder. In fact, adjust valve lash on all cylinders. Then check compression.


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Your description is making me question your diagnosis so far, in terms of is it one cylinder affected or all. Because a GSXR should be able to run (badly) on 3 cylinders, and cleaning the fuel cap shouldn't make a difference to just one cylinder. From your description i'd start by replacing the fuel and ensuring it flows freely to the carburettors. (is it ...



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