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In fuel-injected systems, hot-start problems indicate that the fuel line is unable to maintain pressure. This could be due to a few things related to the fuel supply line, including: a leaky fuel injector minute cracks in the fuel line which leak fuel when under pressure The reason why this happens only for hot starts is because the fuel is more likely ...


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I'm told that the bulk of the break-in is done in the first few minutes of running and that no synthetic of any kind should be used. You're in "test pilot" land now, all bets are off... If it was me (a person not afraid of blowing up an engine), I'd switch to conventional and do a lot of WOT/decel runs to try to beat in the last of the break-in that I could ...


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Are you gonna ride the bike or imgine youself riding the bike in a armchair? You are taking web reviews too seriously. Most of the bad reviews turns out to be empty fart.


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The on/off throttle transitions can be resolved by a mixture of remapping ECUs (in the case of a fuel injected bike) or re-jetting the carburetors as well as fitting a "Throttle Tamer Tube" to your accelerator handle. Basically its a slightly different shaped cam on the Throttle handle that slows down/speeds up the transition so between on and off throttle ...


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From what I can tell, the later models (2002 / 2003) had a new fuel map and were a lot smoother. It ought to be possible to remap the ECU on the bike or possibly replace it with one from a later model. If you find a prospective bike to purchase ride it and see how it feels. It may be that the fuel map on the bike has already been adjusted, if not, budget ...


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Looking at the pictures, I take it the top pic is the one with the cover off (which is shown in the bottom pic). Going off this assumption, this part looks to be attached to an intermediate gear which changes the rotation so the final drive matches the rotation of the engine. It looks as though you'll need exactly the tool you described, a socket with four ...


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I found the following answer to my question after digging more on YouTube, thanks to J&P Cycles and this video https://youtu.be/4p_vjd0GtCk Clutch adjustment must be done with the bike upright or the primary lubricant will spill out of the derby cover. According to the video, this applies to all late model "big-twin" bikes back to the EVO. While it ...


2

Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


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I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


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As a 35 year veteran motorcycle rider and owner of 15 different bikes during that time, while I don't dispute the unsprung weight argument made by DucatiKiller, I can tell you that there is a much, much, much more practical reason for using a single sided swing arm: It dramatically simplifies chain maintenance. You see, with a double sided swing arm, you ...


4

The extra fuel will be being distributed into the breather system of the fuel tank. Most fuel tank have the main fill tube which the fuel goes into plus at least one additional smaller tube to prevent air becoming trapped in the tank. It is likely that you are filling the fill tube with fuel which is then being forced into the tank and up into the breather ...


5

The extra gas you are pumping in your tank is likely going back into the pump at the station, which is also drying out your bank account! Most gas stations are equipped with vapor recovery systems that feed the gas back into their tanks to prevent vapors from escaping into the air, which would otherwise contribute to air pollution. Also, according to the ...


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Judging by your other questions on the site your motorcycle is a '12 Yamaha R6. If so, you have an oil filter, which should pick up the metal flakes and any other debris. A new oil filter and fresh oil should be sufficient to clean out the unwanted debris. It is unlikely that the metal flakes are responsible for a performance degradation if the oil filter ...


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You could use oil flushing agent which is available from most motor factors or, if you cant get any, add a small amount of diesel to the old oil and allow the vehicle to idle for a short period prior to removing the old oil. Also, a large magnet on the sump pan which you then draw to the drain hole should drag out any rogue metal trapped in the system. I'm ...


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Well if you know the oil is leaking from the bolt on the pan I'd say you obviously don't have a good seal. I would re thread the hole and replace the washer and bolt. I stripped the oil pan bolt on my Yamaha R6 a while back. With a little bit of trial and error I discovered that it was a 14mm 1.25 thread so I picked up a 14mm 1.5 thread tap at Autozone, ...


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the easiest thing to do is to raise the needle a notch (or more) if it is too lean. Just don't loose the tiny "E" clip that locates the needle in the throttle slide. Sometimes they spring over a little so be ready for that. Some carburetors do not have adjustable needles. You can enrichen them with a little washer under the E clip. I have used pop rivet ...



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