New answers tagged

0

From http://www.autozine.org/technical_school/engine/smooth1.htm: It seems that no matter how the crankshaft rotate, the combined center of gravity of all 3 pistons and con-rods will remain at the same location, hence no vibration generated. By mathematical analysis, you can also find there is no forces generated in vertical direction as well as ...


6

I don't think this question needs to be limited to motorcycles; in fact, when you consider the plight of the Wankel with respect to cars, it answers the question for other applications as well. I believe the last great production rotary was in the Mazda RX-8, and stopped about 4 years ago. Apex sealing has always been troublesome, especially on cold starts....


1

Not a definitive answer, but I would guess it was strongly influenced by the requirement to have engineers who could successfully design a motorcycle engine using a Wankel rotor. It's completely different from an Otto-cycle piston engine (as I'm sure you know), so you need to have engineers who know (or can learn) the various stresses and fluid flows and ...


2

I'm afraid the only answer I can offer on a Global forum is "Whatever the local traffic regulations stipulate".


1

Another factor is a "strength of materials" issue, combined with the increase in weight of a larger bore piston. The reciprocating forces at TDC are tremendous, and they are the type of force (tension) that contributes to fatigue. Compression forces at BDC are far less an issue in terms of connecting rod/pin/piston stresses. Weight is a huge factor, ...


0

The calculations I have done show that you will only be driving 0.5 amp through the LEDs when the supply is at 14 volts, so you should be ok, since they can take 1.5 amps. Touching the negative wire against the chassis will be shorting the battery, and so bypassing the LEDs, so they shouldn't be damaged. The only thing I can think of is that you haven't ...


1

There are two things here that sound like possible culprits: When the bike is running the voltage seen by the LEDs will be the output of the alternator or generator, which will be around 14.2 V, depending on the LED you're using that might be enough to cause problems. The sparks. They are not a good thing. They imply that there was a sudden rush of current....


1

Did you factor in the resistance supplied by the fuse? Fuses will add resistance (of some level or another) and smaller fuses (smaller conductors) will supply more resistance. But, as noted in the comments, check the voltages at various points (before and after each element). Also, where is the fuse on your diagram? UPDATES Occasionally when wiring I'...


1

It would take a lot of effort to mount a RK motor on a Heritage softtail. The motor on the Heritage softtail is hard mounted to the frame and has a counterbalancer to stop the motor from shaking around in the frame, while the RK is missing the counterbalancer and is rubber mounted to the frame which lets the engine to freely "wobble" in the frame. So you ...


3

There could be a couple culprits here. First of all the clutch might not be adjusted correctly so when you pull the clutch in, there is still a load/pressure on the gears so when you go to kick up or down you essentially forcing the gear to slip from one to another. To fix this, lube the clutch cable and the lever then play try different adjustments on the ...


0

At higher RPM's (right around 12,000 rpm for most applications), the time it takes for valves to open and close is way too long using only spring tension, engines need an engineering solution for this, therefore it adds to the complexity and cost of the engine. It's doable and it's been done, but a high-revving engine will always be pricier.


4

(From an engine kinematics perspective) Increasing bore-to-stroke ratio (B:S) has two potential effects It reduces piston-to-head clearance In order to maintain the same piston displacement and compression ratio (CR), the gap between the piston at top-dead-centre (TDC) and head has to become smaller. This is because a larger bore implies a smaller ...


2

The "solenoid trick" pretty much guarantees that the solenoid is good. When you short it with the wrench you're simulating a start signal on the small terminal. When you do that the solenoid does its job, so the solenoid is probably good. So now the question is why aren't you getting the start signal when you turn the key or hit the starter switch. Start by ...


0

Assuming that disc brakes on a motorcycle are similar to those on a bicycle, it is possible that the rotor – which is on the wheel – is no longer aligned with the caliper on the fork. This could explain your first point if the wheel was not returned to its previous location after changing the tyre. All it would take for this to happen is for there to be a ...


1

Many sport bikes have a partial chain cover. The front sprocket is covered and the upper portion of the chain is covered along the swingarm area. This is done purely for aesthetics and to prevent chain lubricant from getting all over the bike and rider. They actually contribute to chain wear, because they trap road grime and prevent proper cleaning of the ...


0

I believe you have a carburetor engine, and you need to adjust your idle, make a richer air/fuel mix. Your Idle mix is too lean, so you can't start it. When you get it richer, you might need to adjust a throttle. If you have only 1 screw on a carburetor, it'll be a throttle adjustment for idle. Try to start it warm with opened choke and a bit of a ...


2

Turn the choke ON to start a cold engine. Once it is running, set it to PARTIAL until the engine is warm. Once the engine has been running a few minutes, set the choke to OFF. Choke helps the engine run rich. This is necessary when the engine is cold. The engine will start easiest with the choke on. The engine will run best when warm with the choke off.


0

Have the exhaust inspected for cracks or leaks.


0

It seems you are describing an issue with the PCV Valve I'm am attempting to interpret what you are stating. You said the mobil from the engine flows towards the air filter When you say mobil, you mean oil I believe. Oil getting into your airbox, which contains your air filter, would come from your PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) valve. This ...


0

I believe by Mobil you are meaning engine oil. Check your gaskets and oil seals in the engine which might be causing oil to leak towards other compartments. Some motorcycles have a dedicated oil line running towards the valve for lubrication and a rupture on that line then a similar symptom can be seen. Note: Its highly unlikely that the oil will flow ...


1

Check this out.. It's the same question on another forum. Based on the markings on other motors I have, that should be closed/on and up would be open/off. Post a picture of the switch in the horizontal position too for more accurate help.


1

Turn the choke ON to start a cold engine. I cannot see the image, so I do not know if this is vertical or horizontal. If you can look at the choke blade, the choke is ON when it is blocking the path. Once it is running, set it to PARTIAL (diagonal) until the engine is warm. Once the engine has been running a few minutes, set it to OFF. Choke helps the ...


1

This really sounds like an Ignition Switch problem. Go over the symptoms carefully. The engine just stops (as if the ignition was turned off). The starter just clicks (does not turn the engine around). There are many contacts in the ignition switch, so the indicator lights stay on. One or two of them are out of spec, and when it gets hot, the connection ...


0

I afraid you will have to take your clutch cover off. Check your oil level before draining an oil, then drain it, and take a clutch cover off. Before that make sure you have a new clutch cover gasket and new oil. Something wears out in there, and as a bike engine it has an engine, clutch, and a gearbox all in one case, lubes with same oil, and bike engine is ...


4

Just like with a car. Remove the negative battery cable. Get your multimeter, set it to DCA (DC Amps). Use 10A mode if its available. Connect it between the negative post and the cable. Reading should be < 50ma. If its over this, start pulling fuses until you see what makes it drop. When you find what is causing the draw, find out why it is not ...


3

TL;DR It's not possible to prepare a Virago 535 so that both short and tall riders can ride it comfortably. Full answer After investigating a lot into this issue, and even after trying a few other motorcycles, I concluded that it's not possible to prepare the small Virago so that both me and my wife can ride it comfortably. The size and ergonomics of the ...


3

A few assumptions first: It is an open loop alpha-n type of injection system (just has a TPS, no MAF or MAP sensors, no O2 sensor, no catalyst) If the above is true, you could probably make it run using that method, but there will be a trade-off, the difference in fuel requirements at one condition (say idle) between the 250 and 350, will be different to ...


3

As has been mentioned, your list is pretty good. 1 1/2 years isn't too bad depending on storage conditions. Remove rust from brake rotors (are the brake rotors still safe despite heavy rusting or should I replace them?) and other any other parts that are rusted Personally I'd probably replace them, but you can clean them up and see (keeping in mind ...


1

Your list is good, the reason you need to drain the petrol and replace it with new is that petrol chemically degrades over time. "Stale" petrol does not burn well and may coat the internals of the engine with a varnish that will negatively impact engine performance. As for the brake rotors, I would replace them rather than clean them. Once you've gone ...


-1

Here's my attempt on deciphering Yamaha's protocol http://www.iwasz.pl/electronics/motorcycle-black-box-part-1-data-acquisition-with-arduino-mega/. It's a serial link over one, bidirectional line. Another good place too check out is the http://ecuhacking.activeboard.com/


7

That's the check engine light, or CEL - if it lights up, you have a problem with the engine and should stop and investigate it. If it's blinking, count the number of flashes, as this will indicate a particular error code which can help you to determine what is wrong.


1

Bike filters are, frankly, a pain sometimes. The cup filter remover you posted should do the job, just be sure to use lots of leverage with a long pry bar or a piece of long pipe stuck on the end of your socket wrench. The oil filter on my car, if it's stuck, can only be removed by the cup type filter and a bit of hitting a pry bar with a hammer, if its ...


4

First the disclaimer: I don't know much about motorcycles – really all I know about motorcycles is inferred from cars and bicycles. But I do know a fair amount about electrical systems. That said… TL;DR – the headlight may have put your system out of balance by enough that your battery can't make up for the additional load and the alternator is always ...


3

Firstly, please add more information: What is to make and model of you bike? What are the exact modifications you've done (with spec of the components)? Now, when you say "under full load" I assume that you mean with all optional electrical system on and at full settings (like with the high beam on). If that's what you mean, then your horn will function ...


1

@DucatiKiller sorry for being so late; this is a reply to your comment. I wouldn't say I have resolved the issue, but yeah, I have improved the condition. I think the major problem solver in my case is diligent changing of the Engine oil. As far as my bike is concerned, for Bajaj Pulsar 220F (2014 Edition), the only recommended oils are Motul 5100 ...


4

Fits on every known oil filter. Cheap and simple. And never slips. As harder it is tensioned, as harder it will grip it.


5

It must not be the correct size for the filter I'd advise buying something like the CTA-2507. This will grab the sides of the filter and works with a large number of different filters. I use one of these for any aftermarket filter that may not be the same size as the OE sized cups. Alternatively you can use a large pair of channel locks as was suggested.


3

If there's enough room around the filter and it's a cartridge type, you can actually stab it all the way through with a screwdriver or punch and use that as a lever to turn it. If you don't want to do that, try to grab onto it with channel locks or vise grips. Remember that you're throwing the filter away so it doesn't matter if it's squished. If it's an ...


1

The clutch cable needs lubrication from time to time Inside your clutch cable lubrication can become gummed up as well can run out of the cable over time depending on the type of lubrication you are using within the cable. If the cable has not been lubricated for 15,000 miles chances are that the lubrication has lost much of it's friction reduction ...


2

You need a clutch basket removal tool This tool will allow the inner and outer clutch basket to become locked together in order for you to remove the bolt that is affixed to your transmission primary shaft. This is a relatively cheap tool. I recommend you use an air impact to remove the bolt. Upon tightening you will want to use a torque wrench and ...


0

The best way I know of to remove a bolt like this is to use a ratchet with (preferably) an impact 6 point socket. Put it on the bolt and hit the ratchet with a large hammer. One or two good solid hits will often times break it loose. You can also hit the head of the bolt with the hammer, just a couple of taps, not hard swings can also help loosen it. Do NOT ...


1

There are quite a few things that can effect your bike in this way First, you need to truly identify the issue. Before you tear down your carburetor you may want to engage in some troubleshooting prior. You said When ever I am driving in low RPM, I feel like the fuel is cut off in short sharp intervals. And even with the Idle RPM adjuster screw ...


0

You can get angled wrenches, with heads that are turned at a different angle to a standard wrench. You can get wrenches that have curved shafts. A crowsfoot wrench might be a possibility. If you have access to an acetylene torch you can heat and bend a standard wrench so it will clear the obstruction. You may be able to grind off part of the edge of the ...


0

If you just want to get the bolt past finger tight, you could wrap a piece of rubber around the pin, then pull the end of the rubber from the right side, kinda like how pull-start yard equipment works. You'll probably have to push against the pin with an open ended wrench at the same time so balance the side load you're applying, but you may be able to ...


11

Did you ever wonder why an open ended wrench is angled at exactly 15° ? That's so you can turn a nut a little bit, flip the wrench over, turn it a little bit more, and get the job done! You mentioned that you can turn the wrench 1/8th of a turn. That's plenty! In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the mount was designed to accommodate the 15° wrench flip ...


1

If you have enough space that you can fit a ratcheting wrench over it, that may be a solution: That way, you can turn it a little bit at a time. Failing that, if you REALLY want to try to grab the pin, try some vice grips. Tighten them to the appropriate width, clamp them down, and try to turn.. You'll likely damage the pin with the grips.


0

Use a long reach wrench. Something like this


-1

I think you must have to mention it on bike Because carburetor is being used in them mostly and if its leaked than you must first air dry the filter after oiling procedure and then check it out by putting it back. But it would be better to replace it.



Top 50 recent answers are included