New answers tagged

0

Use a long reach wrench. Something like this


-1

I think you must have to mention it on bike Because carburetor is being used in them mostly and if its leaked than you must first air dry the filter after oiling procedure and then check it out by putting it back. But it would be better to replace it.


3

These symptoms are typically caused by one or more blocked jets in the carburettor. Small particles of grit can block any one of the jets in carburettors. The fuel still gets to the engine through the other jets but the efficiency is much degraded. The number and size of the jets varies by model. I have no experience with Yamaha motorbike carbs but I ...


2

On the racing car - Upshift cuts the ignition, Downshift blips the throttle. Details: instead of gear stick they have paddle shift. It is a actuator attached to a gear selector and being pushed or pulled by compressed air or solenoid. Compressed air comes from a little compressor mounted on a car. When you switch gears up you send a signal to ECU which is ...


0

If it starts lovely and doesn't stop, then it'll be too rich air/fuel mix, which means choke or air filter issue. If it is difficult to start, it overheats, or just stops for no reason, it'll be a dirty carb (main jet) or an air leak between a carb and head. Check any rubber cracks, gaskets, any 'oily' areas.. If not, I'd change a spark plug lead. But it ...


0

Check the float chamber and inlet filter on the carb fuel inlet, and have a look at the manifold to carb connection for an air leak.


1

There are a few things for you to look for First - A low battery can initiate misfires as your ignition system will require 12.6 volts or under load the spark will not have the required electrical power to jump the gap of the sparkplug under high-load/resistance situations. Your battery could be getting a lift while charging at certain RPM's which is why ...


3

The first answer is good and rather complete, and I would have added this as a comment if I had the reputation... It might help to understand how a motorcycle gearbox differs from the traditional design that you will see in most explanations. The gears in a motorcycle gearbox do not slide on the shafts to engage and disengage gears, the gears are constantly ...


9

Why the Quick-Shifter? Since these are called quick-shifters we'll dub slow-shifting the traditional way of shifting gear. When you slow-shift you usually close the throttle, disengage the clutch, act on the gear shifting pedal, engage the clutch and reopen the throttle. Now, this is a time-consuming process (a few hundreds of milliseconds) which might be ...


2

"Down" should always be "open", and you can find out where is "close" position. Probably right or left. So "Up" will be "reserve".


3

The best way (high quality of job, pride in workmanship) is to: Pick up an assortment of different diameters of heat shrink tubing. Remove the entire harness from the bike. Do NOT skip this step. If you try to cut corners here the results will be bad. (No Whining!) Cut the sheathing back ten inches from the damage area. Purchase up a few feet of the same ...


3

If the smoke being emitted from the exhaust is white with a hint of blue, it is oil. If the smoke is white with a sweet smell, it is antifreeze. As Anarach pointed out in the comments below, yours is an air cooled engine so there is no antifreeze. If you're burning oil, it definitely could be leaking past the piston rings, which would likely be fixed if ...


1

1) I'd guess that the smoke is oil that is burning. If the piston/ring is bad, it could be allowing oil to be burned with the fuel. 2) Just make sure you buy a good quality part that fits your exact engine. 3) If the piston/ring is your problem, then oil consumption should decrease once fixed.


2

If you are talking about a motorcycle, i would recomend you to invest in a motorcycle cover that you could pull over your bike when it's parked.


2

I would just do the maintenance 500km early. it doesn't have to be all that precisely on the intervals. it's s good way to get more familiar with the new bike. I always do a full oil change I'm taking possession of s new bike, since there is no economic way to know when it was last changed, or with what. getting the oil tested can be done, but it costs as ...


2

Here's a thought: Most cars have rear-wheel drive. Therefore, in most cars, measuring speed from rotation of the front wheel(s) is more reliable because the front wheels should only be able to spin if the car is in forward motion. In contrast, the rotation of the rear wheels is driven by the engine and need not reflect the actual motion of the car - they ...


1

The speedometer is placed in the location that performs adequately well and that costs the manufacturer the least amount of money, and therefore generates the most profit. Period.


6

All of my competition cars have had speedos, some of which didn't work at all. I have never once been in a race and had time to take my eyes off what was happening around me to look at the dials. This is why competition cars tend to equip their dashboards with bright lights which come on when attention is required. The times a speedo is useful is during ...


12

The front wheel is used in most cases with mechanical speedometers (though there are exceptions) because it's just easier (and probably cheaper) to couple the front wheel to the mechanism. Additionally, a mechanical speedometer uses a cable. The longer it is, the less reliable and accurate it becomes, thus the speedometer takes the speed from the nearest ...


11

Its not a rule of thumb that the Speedometer is connected to the front wheel. There are many Suzukies and hondas in my country that have the speedometer connected to the rear wheel. As Rory stated, the only reason I guess is due to the convenience factor since the front wheel is closer to the cockpit.


22

There are pros and cons of each, remember you can easily spin or lock up the rear wheel, and in fact the rear wheel may be far less often at the correct speed. So the decision on this stems from physical connectivity it's much easier to connect from the front wheel to the odometer which is on the handlebars than to route from the rear wheel, up under the ...


2

It's possibly viable The 1cm of fork that is available to mount a clip-on to is a concern Locktite will not make it any safer Options Depending on how invested you are in clip-on's you could use standard cafe bike handlebars and mount them to your risers just like current handlebars are mounted. Back in the 80's we used to just flip handlebars over in ...


3

This sort of scenario is not good for any automobile. Especially when you include "Monsoon". Since you will be driving it everyday your only real problem will be way of dealing with rust. Use WD - 40 (will cost you around INR 300) to combat corrosion.


4

STA-BIL advertises gasoline integrity for 24 months It seems you have exceeded the advertised lifetime of 24 months by 12. Action Items Drain all fuel from the gas tank, fuel lines and fuel pump Inspect inside of fuel tank for rust and/or varnish from evaporated fuel You may need to clean your fuel injectors, you may not. Clean various components with ...


0

So i followed DucatiKiller's answer and sent it in to the dealership. They have no clue to what the problem can be - but are changing the starter. We will see how it will work out.


5

The only curved bore designs I am aware of are toroidal I have been unable to find a match to the drawing, not even close. I took a hard look at steam engines as well. Here is an example of a toroidal design Here is a modern mock up of a similar design.


7

IMO, it is not I'm considering 3 types of rim. Carbon Fiber Billet Forged Aluminum Alloy Cast Aluminum Alloy All three material types do not lend themselves to flexibility. The brittle nature of the material would crack, perhaps not even visibly. But, I have to be honest here I have straightened cast motorcycle wheels using a small jack and a ...


1

I know this doesn't relate to the reassembly process, that's been covered in the other answer by Paul. However most of the time, the rear sprocket is not physically attached to the wheel. They are two separate pieces which have rubber inserts between the metal "teeth". The rubber inserts are there for dampening torque from the motor if you let the clutch out ...


12

Fixing a bent motorcycle wheel is situational. If you are on a 125 to 200cc motorcycle using it for commuting purpose and will be driving under the speed limit, I would not be worried and its absolutely fine to reuse a bent wheel. provided the bend was minimal , if its extensive then changing would be a wiser option. If you are on a 600 to 1000cc super ...


4

You have a lot of questions. I won't be able to answer them all. I will say I have this motor sitting in my shop and have owned a few of these, TL/SV based. Should I be adding any lubricants to anything? Yes, use assembly lube. It's not a disaster if you don't. Assembly lube would typically apply connecting rod and main bearings but it won't hurt ...


7

Your clutch might be bad If your clutch is slipping then the RPM's of the bike can go up but the bike doesn't accelerate as the clutch slips. Many times a clutch will start slipping when the engine is at a higher power output. If you are operating under higher RPM's in higher gears, this is when the greatest load is on the clutch, chances are you are ...


2

So it certainly looks like that is an injection molded plastic piece. Its probably ABS, but it could be anything. The good news is that it doesn't look like it will get much movement in that area. You could do sheet metal style bondo (polyester resin) fix, sand and repaint repair. This isn't always wise on parts that have to remain flexible (e.g. a front ...


1

A minute or so is usually fine Unless your riding in sub-freezing temperatures of course, then you'll want to let it warm up a bit, but if not. I wouldn't worry much about this. The LC version of your BMW boxer motor has considerably tighter tolerances than the air cooled version as it does not have the temp/heat variance as much as an air cooled engine ...


3

Your oil pressure is lower I think the big issue with lugging is a considerably lower oil pressure along with high load. You don't want your connecting rod breaking the hydrodynamic lubrication layer of oil between your connecting rod and crank pin thereby causing damage to the bearing and the pin. This could cause permanent engine damage. Doing this at ...


5

No, you do not need to remap your ECU This doesn't have anything to do with your air fuel ration and ignition timing. You are simply changing the gear ratio for your final drive. Making the sprocket larger will make all of your gears a bit shorter and reduce your top end speed. I typically do this on most of my motorcycles as it makes for better city ...


3

You have a nikasil coating on your cylinder walls You can't just bore, hone and assemble. You have to have a nikasil coating applied to the cylinder walls before reassembly. Your model year of BMW has the nikasil coating. I would not simply hone your cylinders, attempt to the coating, it may be required to put then next overbore size of piston in. If ...


2

I'm not sure by looking at the pictures if you could reach far enough in, but can't you just get a pair of vise grips / locking pliers on the heads? If you tighten it down really well, you should be able to get enough grip to rotate the bolts by the looks of it.


2

Easy outs? No... get reverse drill bits and proper extractors like these.


4

Changing your rear sprocket won't give you more mid range or change the engine power curve in any way. It will alter the torque at the rear wheel at all RPMs. The bike should accelerate faster through the gears but you will also loose out on top speed. You don't need to get dyno tuned just for changing a sprocket. He may however have been implying that to ...


10

I've had great success in the past selecting a 12 sided socket that almost just say fits over the head of these types of bolts. Hammer it on so it's fully covering the head and sitting squarely then attach a ratchet and turn it out. This method has never once failed me. You do have to select an old socket however.


5

Heat is the key to loosen the bolts off - I use a butane torch, if you have access to oxy torch, they can be carefully used too. Keep it local to the bolt as it can affect the rotor magnets which may or may not be an issue for you if you are replacing the actual rotor). Then for the knackered bolt heads, find a sacrificial Torx bit or the right size to jam ...


8

I would use my mig welder to weld a steel rod onto the head. You could weld a T shape on the end of the rod for something to hold. After removing each one, just cut the bolt off the end and repeat. The heat usually helps to free the bolt too. Make sure you protect anything nearby that could be damaged by sparks.


6

Cut a small slot in one edge of the periphery (muffler abrasive whizzer tool), and hammer a chisel in that slot to move the socket head capscrew in the loosening (CCW) direction. You needed to replace it anyway... Also, you CANNOT use too much PB blaster, Kroil, or whatever your favorite liquid penetrating oil is. Rap the head lightly with a hammer a few ...


3

I can't tell from the picture, but if the bolt heads are accessable, you could grab them with a good set of vise grips and get them loose. Easy outs may be tough his situation because the hole in the head of the bolts not deep enough to allow easy outs to get a good bite into the bolt. It may be easiest to drill a bit deeper with a slightly larger drill ...


6

My buddy recommends using Irwin Easy Outs. these to remove from inside the hex And these to remove from the outside Impact drivers are always recommended. If that doesn't do it, vise grips could, but could also cause more damage. Also getting some penetrating lube on them will help if you haven't already.


6

From the picture it looks as if your brushes are completely worn out. If there's no other fault, that is (theoretically) an easy and cheap fix. It appears however that getting brushes for this particular starter isn't as easy as it normally should be. For more information have a look at this thread: http://www.tiger800.co.uk/index.php/topic,11947.0.html as ...


3

There are companies that can recondition these, at least here in the UK. I have had one of mine done before in a couple of days. I assume they must use common components due to the fast turn around.


2

Personally, I replace the rings every time a piston goes back in the cylinder. While I can't speak for motorbikes (*I know they get dismantled a lot more often than a typical car engine) I would assume like with most wear items, you'd want to remove it, then put new ones on after.


3

On a regular clutch, the inner hub that drives the gearbox is a single casting. Clutch plate pressure is solely applied via the outer pressure plate and springs. On a slipper clutch, the inner hub is composed of two pieces that engage via dogs (the same way a bike gearbox/transmission works). The dogs have a flat driving face and a ramped face. Under normal ...


3

I'll start with the bad news - if it's the CD100 model without electric start then it's a no-go unless you replace the engine (I'm inferring this from your statement "customize my old bike with a self start"). You won't be able to retro fit a starter to it as the cases and internals will not be configured for one. However, if the engine does have electric ...



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