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4

I've had this problem with my Honda accord 96 for an entire year and just figured out what was causing the vibration in idle mode. Changed mounts, cleaned air idle control valve and throttle body . Took it to a friend who in no time told me it was a BAD COIL not producing enough power. So check out your COILS


4

Depending on the design of your car, the engine mounts may have been removed during the alternator removal and replacement so any damage may now show up. Alternatively, if the alternator previously wasn't working and is now drawing on the vehicles RPM to charge the batter, the idle may have dropped (which could account for the vibration). If the vibration ...


4

While both Paulster2's and Steve Matthews's have good answers, there is another thing to consider. The 3.5 V-6 equipped Camrys that year (not sure about the 4 cly) have what Toyota calls Active Control Engine Mounts. They use vacuum and electricity to control the mounts. Also on the 3.5 engine it's quite an extensive repair to get to the alternator off, and ...


3

Noise and vibration are the two biggies for the downside. Most serious races have their engines solid mounted to the frame. The motor mounts are just there to make it more comfortable for the driver. If you aren't worried about comfort, solid mount is the way to go. I'm sure you have to go around and tighten things once in a while as well. Vibration has a ...


2

You're not going to be able to weld the block to the frame, due to the block (likely) being cast. You can bolt it with solid motor mounts, which are commercially available for more common performance engines.


2

I think the problem was probably there before and you are just noticing it. Lots of times, the problems we experience with vehicles happens over time. Motor mounts are one such thing. They do not wear out overnight or just give up the ghost all of a sudden (in the vast majority of the cases). Most of the time, as these things wear out, we don't notice it ...


2

Sounds like you need to look at the rear bushing of the front wheel control arms. These are made of rubber on most cars and don't last beyond 100k. The thunk you feel is because a normal bushing has firm hold of the connection with the control arm, where as your control arm is probably loosely held in place by worn rubber. When you accelerate, the forces ...


2

Are your mounts located directly near your exhaust manifold? Do they have a heat shield? The rubber can dry and crack due to the heat from the exhaust manifold if not properly insulated/protected from the heat. On my 944, there is a small tin heat shield that protects the mounts from the manifold. Leaking oil onto the mounts will also accelerate their wear, ...


2

A few factors contribute to rubber inserts within motor mounts to fail. 1. Dry Rot The rubber decays over time and loses it's elasticity. The degraded rubber fails slowly over time. 2. Chemicals Some chemicals can accelerate the decay of rubber. Certain acids such as hydrofluoric and hydrochloric will degrade Buna-N rubber. EPDM rubber can degrade ...


2

The main thing which damages motor mounts is the torque provided by the engine (the twisting motion the motor mounts are preventing). When you are driving down the highway on a long cruise, you are actually putting less torque the motor mounts than you would if you were in stop & go traffic. Any motion causes wear on your motor mounts, but highway ...


1

It would be very expensive to replace if the frame or the engine get damaged. FYI, many motorcycles, if not all, have the engine directly bolted to the frame. The main downside I can see is the vibrations.



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