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3

Considering you are saying the fluid level is fine, it's likely one of two things: The serpentine belt is slipping during lower rpm operation. At lower rpm is when there is the most demand put on the pump. If the belt is old and worn or if the idler pulley is not keeping up with where it should be, the belt could slip. Also, if there is any oil or ...


3

The problem persist and I remove the door card yesterday. I figured that the reason is the mis-aligned rod connected to manual lever used to open the door from the inside. It somehow gotten loose from the guide and blocks the spring/switch (it looks like a spring) connected to the actuator. So there is no way for the actuator to work on-off. I also figured ...


2

An air conditioning system is separated into two sides, high pressure side and low pressure side. There are service fittings on each side. If you think of the AC system as a hula hoop, the system is separated on one side by the compressor and on the other by the expansion valve. The high side has the condenser and the low side has the evaporator (the cold ...


1

The A/C system has a pressure sensor built in, so the A/C compressor wont run without refrigerant in the system. Therefore there is no problem driving the car.


1

Sounds like a decent plan of attack. The post-work actions should really be: leak test evacuate the system recharge with refrigerant


0

There are two things that could have gone wrong. The Actuators present in the driver side door which control the lock/unlock possibly due to rain. I am specifically saying driver side door since only it has 4 wire connections, two for the actuator and 2 for connecting to the central locking chip. So in essence it can control all other doors. The main board ...


2

As Zaid says, it sounds like a problem with the actuator. Are you trying to open it with the key, or a remote? I presume key from the way you've phrased it? If it's the key, then it'll be the actuator in the driver's door - i.e. the switch that is activated when you turn the key. I suspect from your description that water has got in somehow, and caused a ...


3

There is a tool you can get. It has a reservoir and a bubble on the top. Suck it full of coolant and you can see your ratio and what temperature it is good to freezing and boiling wise. The primary job of coolant is to keep your cooling system from exploding in the winter. It does help to increase the boiling point, but pure water will typically boil at ...


2

My aunties Polo had it's radiator replaced and the mechanic who completed this job used pure water. That winter, the water in the radiator froze and because ice expands, when it melted and turned back into water, it leaked out of the now broken radiator. Antifreeze performs several jobs in the cooling system. It increases the specific heat capacity of the ...


1

A good indicator in the decision can be this question - which one is still being manufactured, has a large following and aftermarket part support? What this may imply is that you may have more luck finding cheaper parts for the MX5 than MR2 as well as getting more support on the forums or from local clubs.


2

Out of the 2, the MR2 is typically more reliable. It's classic overbuilt Toyota. However, the parts are obscenely expensive and can take days to weeks to get when you should happen to need one. Miata parts are cheap and readily available. I wouldn't make a decision based on that though. It's not like deciding between econobox A and econobox B. The MR2 ...


2

If milk-like oil ends up in the radiator despite replacing the head gasket, it is likely that the head itself has warped due to overheating, allowing oil to leak into the coolant channels. While there is a remote possibility to salvage the cylinder head by having it skimmed by a professional machinist, in all probability it will need to be replaced.


1

As I have done in the past: Just drain some fluid out, then top off thru filler tube using funnel. http://forum.mazda6club.com/engine-drivetrain/126047-draining-6s-automatic-transmission-fluid.html


4

Most cars do not have drain plugs for the transmission in my experience. In fact, I have only seen it on one, which had a plug because the car had a permanent transmission filter. That said, it is very easy to overfill transmission fluid.The link you posted is an example of a cavalier. GM took out the dipstick to prevent inept owners from overfilling the ...


3

I do not believe that all automatic transmissions have drain/fill plugs. I had a 1993 Ford Explorer where this was the case - I had to drop the pan to drain it (and replace the filter) then had to refill it through the dipstick tube with a funnel. This being the case, I do not think it is outside the realm of possibility that the previous owner did not know ...


0

What temperature was the fluid when you measured it? IIRC ATF expands quite a bit with heat, and you'll often see separate cold and hot marks on the dipstick...



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