New answers tagged

2

This can be made to work well. As a teenager I tried the technique seen from Mad Max, with an old rear wheel drive car. While travelling forward at speed, press the clutch fully in, allow the engine revs to drop so no load on gears. Then change into reverse, raise the revs to a high level (thinking nearly red-line) and dump the clutch. As long as you keep ...


1

Yes and no. Yes the engine would in theory be forced to rotate in reverse. No in practice because the extreme torque shock would simply strip the clutch shaft splines or even completely screw the shaft in two. Please don't try this at home...


4

A High School auto shop teacher about 35 years as an experiment on a old shop car managed to do precisely that. Got the old car to 60+ MPH and slammed into reverse--suffice it to say it was not pretty. Idler shaft milled like a lathe, the gears....you don't wanna know...LOL


1

I suspect this will get closed soon as 'too localised' and 'shopping'... I don't know of any such courses, but I'd suggest getting in touch with a local community/sixth form college - find one that offers a car mechanics course/BTEC etc and talk to the teacher in charge of that course - they might be able to arrange something or put you in touch with ...


0

The fact that you stalled the car uphill and that it is acting that have most likely nothing in common. Gear knob vibration is quite normal on older cars. Also, when car is on low RPM under load, vibrations tend to be more prominent in manual transmission cars. Start with driving the car on the flat surface to see if it's accelerating as expected. If the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included