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51

Most of the time when you drive, you're putting a load (and causing wear) on what I'm going to call the "forward" face of each tooth on each gear in your drivetrain. The front of a tooth on the crankshaft pushes against the back of a tooth on the next gear in line, which pushes the next gear, etc. When you use "engine braking", all you are doing is ...


20

Most of the time you won't need heavy braking in traffic. You can avoid stopping and starting by: Driving more calmly Leaving plenty of distance between you and the vehicle in front (even at low speed) Simply taking your foot of the accelerator early If you let the car slow down, and use the gear until it is no longer appropriate (too slow that the ...


17

Using the clutch engagement to turn the vehicle off can definitely hurt the car. Essentially what you're doing is wearing the clutch, bearings that lie within the motor, rings and valve seals. If you can visualize the physics and mechanics of what you're doing, it makes sense. When you let your foot off of the clutch pedal, you're pressing the friction disk ...


15

If you downshift into a gear at a RPM that is within the norm of driving then no, no harm done. When you downshift what is slowing you down is actually the compression stroke and is recommended over hard braking. Like another said, it is a bit of a mix of the two but engine braking is ok as long as the engine stays under redline, so do not go from 5th to ...


14

What it comes down to is there are trade offs. In the case of the engine, it's torque output and rotating mass versus engine speed ... read on. First, it isn't power which is needed, but torque to keep an engine running. In the early days of engines, each had one cylinder and didn't run very fast. To keep it running, it had a very large flywheel attached to ...


13

You can do this if your engine RPM, the speed of the vehicle, and the gear you are shifting to/from is just right. The reason you can do this is because you have synchros in the transmission which allows the two gears to match rotational speeds as they come in contact (basically, there is more to it than this, but hopefully you get the drift). The synchros ...


13

According to NY Daily News, only 6.5% of cars in the United States were Manual Transmission in 2013. That number may even be an overestimate. More helpful is Fix.com, which actually has a useful chart:


11

Which would you rather change - your brake pads or your clutch? By downshifting to decelerate you are trading wear on your brake pads for wear on your clutch (among other things). Brake pads are much cheaper and easier to replace than a clutch. Personally, having done both, I'd rather do 50 brake jobs before I'd do one clutch job.


10

It all depends on your definition of high. In my car, the red line is at 7500 rpm, and that indicates that driving with the revs over this line for anything other than brief periods is expected to cause damage, either through overheating, increased wear, increased loading on bearings, lack of sufficient oil/fluid flow etc. When driving I have to keep my ...


9

Donovan's is the only answer that has any truth in it. Downshifting and engine braking will have NO effect on the clutch, as you don't slip the clutch it doesn't wear out the engine, as you use the compression stroke and it is far better on tyres and handling as any advanced driving instructor would tell you. It is just more difficult, as you need to ...


9

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


9

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


9

Short term answer: No. There are a lot of countries where the price difference between a manual and an automatic will matter. Long term answer: Yes. But because of a different reason, I'd say - electric cars.


8

I assume you mean that the revs are over 2k, if they were over 20k I think you'd get a different sort of noise from the engine bay. From the description it sounds like you'd got a damaged syncro, especially if this happens when you're shifting down into 3rd. Up shouldn't make quite that bad a noise but if the syncro is really on the way out (which your ...


8

A lot of newer cars are smart about shifting (they have electronic solenoids to control the hydraulics). I can put my 2001 Nissan Pathfinder in reverse at 50 MPH, and it's smart enough to not engage, it goes into neutral. However, at speeds below its cutoff point (I've done it at about 15 MPH and regretted it), you can put a lot of stress on the drivetrain ...


7

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If you're rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed ...


7

Of course it's possible, but in an ideal electric car, you don't even need a transmission with multiple gears. The electric motor has a much greater range of torque/speed output at its disposal than an internal combustion engine does.


7

Go rent a car and practice. The only thing different is that you need to develop a feel for when the clutch is engaged sufficiently for you to give it gas. "Academically" speaking, you need to give a little bit of gas, let go of the clutch slowly until the car just starts to move, and then slightly increase the gas while releasing the clutch smoothly. Think ...


7

To answer your question, no it isn't bad for your car to keep it in as high a gear as you can while still maintaining speed. As long as you are above idle in RPM and your engine isn't lugging, you aren't doing any damage. See this link for more information about lugging. You mentioned that you might do this to be quieter and for fuel efficiency. Your car ...


6

Lugging an engine is like hammering the engine parts with every explosion in a cylinder. It racks on the rod bearing/journals, makes the pistons slap the side of the cylinders hard, and if is done enough, could probably break piston rings. It also creates a hammer effect all the way through the drivetrain. There are springs in the friction disk (of the ...


6

Second gear is usually the first of the gears to start to fail because it is the most used gear of the set. The hub and clutch, baulk ring, and gear cone wear and cause the difficult engagement. The gearbox requires an overhaul to remedy the problem.


6

No significant damage has been done. There are two potential areas that can be damaged by extended driving with the park brake on. The park brake shoes/pads will wear prematurely if the vehicle is driven with the brake engaged. The clutch will also suffer some wear as the brake being on will require slipping/riding the clutch on every start. In your case you ...


6

I don't know about a Mercedes in particular, but that's exactly what happens when a clutch goes bad. There are three main parts to a clutch: pressure plate; friction disk; and flywheel. Each has a specific function: Flywheel - is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. This part is usually attached to the rear of an engine (on ...


6

If the noise is only happening when the clutch is engaged (pedal out), it's not the throw out bearing. You'd only hear the noise when you push on the pedal. This is because the only time the throw out bearing is being used is when you are pushing the pedal down. It won't contact the clutch fingers any other time, and therefor cannot make noise with the ...


6

It's the difference between where the clutch grabs and releases. It means that area between the two is very small (relative to clutch pedal travel). You will find there won't be a lot a smooth transition as you release the pedal. It will just grab. It will take some muscle memory recalibration to find the feathering point of your clutch consistently. ...


6

Unfortunately the answer is "Yes". In the US it might be extinct in a few years. Let me back that up, I live in India and and 98% of the cars on the roads are manual. The automatic transmission is a luxury which most buyers just skip on. That said, the only two things which inhibits the population to move towards automatic are price and fuel economy. ...


5

First, everyone who said that the braking effect comes from the compression stroke is wrong...the air in the cylinder is compressed which takes energy, yet after top dead center acts as a spring and helps force the piston back down, returning the exact same force as was put into it in the first place. Probably more, actually, since the compression heats the ...


5

I don't think the Neutral Safety Switch can jam a transmission, but the throw out bearing in the clutch can do this. I doubt it would be a sychro, but you never know. How many miles on the car/clutch?


5

I second Timo's assessment: it's likely that the synchromesh gear (AKA synchro) is worn badly enough that it's not able to do it's standard rev matching for you. Instead, as he suggests, you have to come a lot closer to matching the engine revs to the wheel revs, using your right foot with care. That said, it's possible that you have a problem that is ...


5

We have a 2011 Ford Focus TDCi 115 engine (same, I assume in your Mondeo econetic) and we are currently having our slave cylinder and clutch plates changed. The car is on 35,000 miles and has previously had the clutch master cylinder replaced. According to many Ford forums, it is very common on these new 1.6 TDCi 115 engines to have clutch related issues. ...



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