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25

Most of the time when you drive, you're putting a load (and causing wear) on what I'm going to call the "forward" face of each tooth on each gear in your drivetrain. The front of a tooth on the crankshaft pushes against the back of a tooth on the next gear in line, which pushes the next gear, etc. When you use "engine braking", all you are doing is ...


9

If you downshift into a gear at a RPM that is within the norm of driving then no, no harm done. When you downshift what is slowing you down is actually the compression stroke and is recommended over hard braking. Like another said, it is a bit of a mix of the two but engine braking is ok as long as the engine stays under redline, so do not go from 5th to ...


7

Which would you rather change - your brake pads or your clutch? By downshifting to decelerate you are trading wear on your brake pads for wear on your clutch (among other things). Brake pads are much cheaper and easier to replace than a clutch. Personally, having done both, I'd rather do 50 brake jobs before I'd do one clutch job.


7

It all depends on your definition of high. In my car, the red line is at 7500 rpm, and that indicates that driving with the revs over this line for anything other than brief periods is expected to cause damage, either through overheating, increased wear, increased loading on bearings, lack of sufficient oil/fluid flow etc. When driving I have to keep my ...


5

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


5

A lot of newer cars are smart about shifting (they have electronic solenoids to control the hydraulics). I can put my 2001 Nissan Pathfinder in reverse at 50 MPH, and it's smart enough to not engage, it goes into neutral. However, at speeds below its cutoff point (I've done it at about 15 MPH and regretted it), you can put a lot of stress on the drivetrain ...


5

I assume you mean that the revs are over 2k, if they were over 20k I think you'd get a different sort of noise from the engine bay. From the description it sounds like you'd got a damaged syncro, especially if this happens when you're shifting down into 3rd. Up shouldn't make quite that bad a noise but if the syncro is really on the way out (which your ...


5

I'm a driver trainer/examiner and most of the time you rarely need heavy braking in traffic. If you drive calmly, allow plenty of distance between you and the vehicle in front (even at low speed)) and just take your foot of the accelerator early you avoid stopping and starting. If you let the car slow down and use the gear until it is no longer appropriate ...


4

Donovan's is the only answer that has any truth in it. Downshifting and engine braking will have NO effect on the clutch, as you don't slip the clutch it doesn't wear out the engine, as you use the compression stroke and it is far better on tyres and handling as any advanced driving instructor would tell you. It is just more difficult, as you need to ...


4

This seems to be the clutch is going out or possibly the synchromesh is no longer working. The clutch is unable to fully disengage the engine from the transmission to allow you to shift into reverse. If the synchromesh is no longer working fully, this would make it harder to shift in every gear but it's still possible. You are, in essense, ...


4

In most cars it's a major operation and quite expensive. There's usually body and mount modifications that need to be made. You'll need the new trans and all the controls. Some cars have a different ECU and wiring harness for each transmission. Possibly vacuum system modifications. Sometimes it even requires changing out drive/halfshafts, etc. What ...


4

Grumbling noises while turning are usually CV joints. There are 4 of these (one each end of each drive shaft), but he usual culprit is the outer one on the side that is causing the noise - i.e. in this case the right hand one. To check, jack the front of the car up and support on axle stands. grip the drive shaft firmly in one hand (wear gloves...), and ...


4

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If your rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed adds ...


4

there is typically a casting number on the block. It is located just to the rear of the drivers side cylinder head. Don't confuse this with the serial number pad that is located on the front of the block in front of the passenger side cylinder head. This site has some good photos showing both locations.


4

Go rent a car and practice. The only thing different is that you need to develop a feel for when the clutch is engaged sufficiently for you to give it gas. "Academically" speaking, you need to give a little bit of gas, let go of the clutch slowly until the car just starts to move, and then slightly increase the gas while releasing the clutch smoothly. Think ...


3

Firstly a slight bit of terminology to reduce confusion - the normal state of the clutch is engaged (i.e. engine connected to wheels), and you press the pedal to disengage it. I don't disengage the clutch before braking. This allows me to use engine braking to help reduce the speed of the car - Once the speed of the car gets too low for the gear you're in, ...


3

If you can figure out another application (vehicle) for that engine, you can refer to the engine related parts of a manual for that application. Or at least look up information on the internet. There will be numbers cast into the block which should help identify it. Here's a link to get you started, assuming you've got a small block Chevy. This looks ...


3

In the automatics I've been in where people do that, it's a rather dramatic bang/clunk if shifted from Reverse to Drive while still rolling backwards. I hate riding with people that do that, makes me cringe everytime. I hear newer cars are smarter about it, but it still sounds like a bad idea. I hate to risk my transmission on a sensor that might fail ...


3

Within a certain range, of course more RPMs mean more wear. Especially if your maintenance is based on time or miles. Consider a bearing that has a lifetime of 1,000,000 revolutions. If you drive at 5,000 RPM, that bearing is going to use up its lifetime twice as fast as if you were driving at 2,500 RPM. On the other hand, "lugging" an engine at too low an ...


3

I second Timo's assessment: it's likely that the synchromesh gear (AKA synchro) is worn badly enough that it's not able to do it's standard rev matching for you. Instead, as he suggests, you have to come a lot closer to matching the engine revs to the wheel revs, using your right foot with care. That said, it's possible that you have a problem that is ...


3

On some of my manuals, I've found that before shifting into reverse, putting the shifter into 5th gear helps. I don't have a mechanical explanation for this (my thought is something to do with the synchromesh). Try it, see if it helps at all. On my current vehicle my process to go to reverse is: Clutch pedal in Go to neutral Go into 5th Go into reverse ...


3

All cars are different, especially when it comes to clutches. Some have, as you say, a high engagement point on the clutch, where you can almost let the clutch out all of the way before it starts to engage. Others do it much lower in the clutch pedal arch (further pushed towards the firewall). It's just something you have to get used to. I cannot tell you ...


2

You are 100% putting wear and tear on your engine plus transmission. Not only that but you're also increasing the wear on your clutch. Having said that, I rev match every time I downshift. This still puts wear and tear on the components but not as much as physically slowing the car down when bringing it down a gear. Brake pads are cheaper and easier to ...


2

If you double-clutch the downshifts and ensure that the engine is running at exactly the right speed before you engage the clutch, any additional wear will be insignificant. Double-clutching will, if done properly, eliminate any additional wear of the synchronizers and if the engine is running at just the right speed before you engage the clutch after the ...


2

Guidance from the Institute of Advanced Motorists in the UK is to place the car into neutral and use the parking brake. The wear on the clutch from keeping the clutch pedal in isn't likely to be an issue(*), but in the event of the car behind bumping you your foot could slip off the clutch, propelling you into the car in front! From an ecological ...


2

We have a 2011 Ford Focus TDCi 115 engine (same, I assume in your Mondeo econetic) and we are currently having our slave cylinder and clutch plates changed. The car is on 35,000 miles and has previously had the clutch master cylinder replaced. According to many Ford forums, it is very common on these new 1.6 TDCi 115 engines to have clutch related issues. ...


2

What your mechanic is saying makes sense to me. The pinch ball is a wear item which, unfortunately, goes bad over a period of time. It is considered a "sacrificial" part (door pins are another type of sacrificial part). This is so wear is created in a predictable spot in the linkage chain. Instead of replacing the entire linkage, you replace the ball, which ...


2

It may be a case of the clutch still needing to be broke in and/or "bedded", but if it continues doing it after 500 to 1000 miles, I'd take it back to the dealership to have it looked over. You should not be causing any issues with the engine or the car, but that also depends on the level of vibration that you are feeling. If you have a friend who is very ...


1

If there is no resistance to the pedal, I'd suspect a hydraulic problem. Check the fluid level in the master cylinder (which should be the opposite side of the bulkhead to the pedal, and will look like a smaller, simpler version of the brake cylinder). If it is low or empty, you have a leak. If it is still full, you most likely have a problem with the ...


1

From what I have learned, I must first engage the clutch before braking. Then once I'm at a full stop, do I keep both feet on the clutch and one on the brake, or can I release the clutch while keeping my foot on the brake, or can both be released? Does the same apply when I am not on an incline? It doesn't matter; not sure why you'd depress the ...



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