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1

Most manufactures have a website where repair data can be viewed and printed, some are easy to use some are almost impossible but the the info is in there. Some examples are: BMW: oss.bmw.de Peugeot: serivebox.peugeot.com VW: erwin.volkswagen.de Audi: erwin.audi.com Once you have an account set up you can pay for access in what ever time amount you ...


0

There are physical repair manuals you can buy from a company called Haynes. The manuals are based on tearing down and rebuilding whatever car is in question and can be useful references if you are unsure the car you are working on.


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More than likely your Honda has a CVT transmission and this is normal behavior for a computer controlled CVT, to let it rev higher when under a load such as driving up a hill.


4

Use a dry erase board (whiteboard) I use a whiteboard in the garage. Low tech, but very effective. I track not only necessary service date/mileage, but also when they're due for government inspection and also any other minor items I notice but don't want to fix right then. So for me, it looks something like this: vehicle next svc date/mi ...


2

I make my own little paper tag. It has three things on it Date of last oil change Mileage at last oil change Mileage at next oil change. (generally I use 5000 mile increments) I write real small. the tag is 1" x 1.5" or so. Then I use scotch tape to tape this tag to the upper left hand corner of the windshield on the inside of the car. The ones the ...


2

Go to the local parts store. They have small plastic stickers which remind you when to change the oil; in the USA, they're usually free, as long as you don't take hundreds. Get one for each vehicle, and put it on the windscreen - 'next service at 315,000 or August 2017' (OK, you can see how old my cars are!). To remember, just drive the vehicle and look up. ...


0

I suspect this will get closed soon as 'too localised' and 'shopping'... I don't know of any such courses, but I'd suggest getting in touch with a local community/sixth form college - find one that offers a car mechanics course/BTEC etc and talk to the teacher in charge of that course - they might be able to arrange something or put you in touch with ...


5

I've even been told that you have to get the alignment done when the tires are new so they will allow the wheels to sit evenly and that worn tires will invalidate the alignment process since the wheels would then be "aligned" to the wear pattern. This is not true; the tire wear pattern has no affect on the measurements or adjustments. If the ...


5

You can get an alignment at any time. It's often a good idea to get one when you get new tires, just so you don't mess them up if you have any alignment issues. However, you should also get one done if you have any kind of suspension work done (new shock absorbers, new tie rods, etc.) While you probably don't need to have one done if your tire wear is even, ...


3

Er, not so much. I'm assuming we're talking Motorcycle here, right? What if there is a slight leak in the brake lines somewhere? You'd be losing fluid and that would NOT be a good indicator of brake pad wear. Different vehicles have different size brake actuators, with accompanying different volumes of fluid to account for as the brake pads wear down ...


9

Cabin filters on modern cars use something called activated carbon (or at least some of them do) which is basically two paper / cotton sheets either side of a fine layer of carbon particles. It looks to me as though your cabin filter has a hole in it and therefore is blowing carbon all over the inside of the cabin. I'd take it back to wherever installed ...


1

It may indicate that either you need to wait a while to put the choke in or that you need the idle screw adjusted on your carburetor.


1

I drove my 2001 Bonneville 437,000 miles over the course of 10 years and NEVER changed the brake fluid. Take it for what it's worth.


0

I'm not familiar with Ford Focus, but I used to have a '77 Plymouth Fury that had this problem, it was a valve in the master cylinder not allowing the front brakes to release, and any dragging would cause expansion to cause the brakes to apply, aggravating the condition to the point where it wouldn't move, even though I was spinning the back wheels on dry ...


2

Here are some places to start: You car has a wheel bearing inside a wheel hub assembly (the part you bolt the tire to), there are also one or two control arms that are part of your suspension. Normally the bushings inside these control arms tear or disintegrate (they are usually a rubber compound) and the mounting components (a pin and clevis system) will ...


0

I've checked the brake fluid frequently and also yes I've tried a couple different brands. Even dot 4 when in the manual it says dot 3. Only thing that seems to help is letting the car sit and press on the brakes while the car is off so loosen them up.


4

Regular service and fixing what's broken will keep just about any car running for a long time. The main difference with driving shot distances, is that your engine spends more time at less than optimal temperature. This is not as big a deal with modern fuel injection engines, but parts may still wear out faster than vehicles with mostly 'highway miles.' ...


4

The only way this might have damaged your engine is if oil flowed out the tube and left the engine dry. I'd suggest since no oil light came on, suggesting a lack of oil, you never had this issue. (There wouldd be a large oil slick inside the engine bay as well.) Some vehicles have the tube stuck down into the oil. If there is excess pressure in the ...


3

Your starting system is typically: (-> represents wires) Battery -> fuse -> ignition switch -> relay -> starter The starter also has a direct connection to the battery (big red wire) The fact that it works the second time means there is likely a loose connection down the line somewhere. The click you hear is either the relay or the starter solenoid. ...


3

I see no cause for concern here. Even if debris makes its way into the oil sump and contaminates the engine oil, your oil filter should be able to capture it and remove it from the oil to prevent extended wear and tear on any bearings.


1

Mechanically, its hard to say without actually seeing the engine internals, however as a precaution you can get a oil change done, this will remove (or nearly remove) all the debris which might have gotten in, you could also use an Engine Flush as well, if you are unsure of how to use an Engine flush properly then take a can to your mechanic with new oil and ...


0

One thing I've heard of is to measure the weight of the filter. A better filter has more filter material and heavier stronger components. I'll have to look up the source when I get home , but I've actually taken a digital scale with me and weighed oil filters and found significant differences in weight.


3

I use aluminum foil and Turtle Wax chrome polish on my Harley. The aluminum foil is softer than the steel wool and will not scratch the chrome and at the same time adds a aluminum coating to the rust spots making it have a sealed finish. I also apply the Turtle Wax chrome polish to the aluminum foil so it polishes as it cleans the rust off. Make sure you let ...


3

Information provided courtesy of Purolator Filters via theSHOP Let’s face it. While performance engines represent the most fun in our businesses, it’s the everyday engines we build that pay the rent for most of us. That’s just a fact of life. We can all put valve guides in small-block Chevy heads pretty much blindfolded, and we all know how easily a ...


2

The last thing you want to do is have someone drive your car every few weeks. What's important is that the last time you drove your car before putting it to sleep for five months is that you drove at least 15-18 miles on the highway, long enough to get the oil hot enough to stave off water vapor/condensation, which forms carbonic acid, sludge, varnish. ...


7

This is an excellent question, and absolutely correct that there is no linear relationship between the miles driven and the amount of wear on the engine. For machines which don't move much, or which move forward/reverse/idle in equal amounts, an odometer doesn't offer much additional information about how the machine was used. Thus these types of machines ...



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