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I never had an oil pan plug leak until I got a Subaru. My 1966 Plymouth still has the original seal. Both Subaru leaked until I replace the crush seal. Buy them in a 10 pack and they are cheap. It does not matter whether they are steel or aluminum. Torque the plug to 31 lb/ft and live leak free. Subaru from 2004 forward have a bottom cover so leaks are not ...


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More than likely the problem is a leaky valve cover gasket. It's just something which happens over time. The old one becomes hard and cracks, thus oil starts dripping. Over time, this collects on the different parts with whatever amount of dirt is available and, voila! You have gunk all over the place. First thing to do is thoroughly clean the affected area ...


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The only type of vehicle you need wait on is a diesel powered one. The reason for that is you need to wait (in most of them) for the glow plugs to heat the combustion chamber. Modern fuel injected cars will keep their fuel pressure after shutdown. It will stay there (usually) for a good 24 hours (Note: 24 hours is an approximation. It will take longer in ...


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The seals may be worn or deflated (not as puffy as they used to be) and are allowing the dust to come through. As a fix, you could try something (vs replacement) I saw on a TV show recently. They added a slender piece of rubber inside of the seal to make it stick out more. Something like this: This is 1/4" tubing. The seal should have an air gap inside of ...


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You should start by doing the things you said you haven't done. Tune up and general repair are needed. I would change the oil, adjust valve lash, clean carb (maybe check jet size rich/lean running), spark plug, check coil gap on flywheel. Lots of reasons so start checking one by one off the list.



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