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11

As long as the rest are tight (and torqued to spec), I would put a new nut on and torque it to spec. Given that there isn't and left over metal on the stud, like the nut stripped out, I would say it wasn't torqued to spec and worked itself loose. The bang you heard might had been the wheel flinging the nut.


10

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


9

Being as it's only 0.05mm larger in diameter, you shouldn't have a problem unless you're using that socket on a rattle-gun every day. If it's a 6-point socket, the wear on the nut should be minimal (12-point sockets have more of a chance at 'rounding' the nut). Ideally, however, you should go down to the shop and spend two dollars on the correct sized ...


8

That would be correct. There should be no issue of using the impact with the wheel off the ground. You are exactly right in that the tire should be on the ground when using a breaker bar or tire iron. The reason for this, besides the wheel spinning and you never getting the lug loosened, is because you could torque the car over and cause it to fall off of ...


8

tl;dr: No. An impact wrench isn't a cure-all. The mechanic explained that sometimes lug nuts are much over torque because all shops use impact gun to tighten them. That does not cause any problem as long as they are opened using an impact wrench. Well, that's not quite true. Over-torque is bad in and of itself. At a very high level, it damages ...


7

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), that is not a broken lug nut, but the nut which is formed into the plastic hub cap. Take the hub cap off and you'll see the lug nuts. If you notice, there are seven lugs on the hub cap. When you take that off, there will be eight lugs on the wheel itself. This is a standard hub cap for the ...


5

Quite simply, no it is not safe. If a car manufacturers specifications say 5 studs, that's because they've done their homework on the forces involved. Think of the worst case: braking hard while turning sharply on a rough surface. The mass of the car, acting at an acute angle to the rim, comes down on the wheel lugs with a g-force proportional to the ...


5

These would appear to be "McGard 8-spline" lugs. I don't have direct experience with them, but they appear to come in two sizes: Image from BrandSport Auto Accessories. Never used them, but they had a good diagram. These lugs are commonly called "spline" or "tuner" lugs. They are sold to look sporty (because they are different and cool), provide ...


4

I agree wholeheartedly with both Ben and Paulster. However, I use a high-power air impact for to tighten, on it's lowest setting, and also have a selection of color "torque stix" with a minimum of three passes (snug, torque, final) while in the air. While not perfect, I think this is a reasonable compromise between my efficiency needs and returning a safe ...


3

Unbalance tires maybe one of the reason. You may want to go to the shop and have its alignment checked. If they are new, you may have a free check up where you purchased them which i have done before.


2

Perhaps I'm not understanding, but if you had the wheels "installed" then the person/shop that did that must have used some sort of tool, and if you paid for the lugnuts they should have given you this tool as it usually comes with a kit. Are you sure it's not in the glovebox? That's where I always threw the special socket when I did these kinds of ...


2

I can see where your mechanic is coming from. The reason being that, although like Steve Cross notes, the impact wrench applies a lot of force suddenly, it applies the force in an evenly rotational direction. ANY wiggle in the socket (Which there will always be or you wouldn't be able to get it on the nut) and the breaker bar will be putting lateral force ...


2

In order to fit a different size or type of wheel to a car, four things need to be compatible: Pitch Circle Diameter (PCD) - this is the number and distance between the nuts/studs, e.g. 4x100 (4 studs, 100mm diameter). This needs to be the same for both old and new wheels. Centre bore diameter - the size of the hole in the middle of the wheel. If it's too ...


1

Engineers typically design parts to withstand a greater load than they are actually expected to see. This is known as a "factor of safety" and assures the parts won't fail when extenuating circumstances are encountered where the product is stressed beyond the design calculations considered. Given that NASCAR is a very specific type of racing with (...



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