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9

As long as the rest are tight (and torqued to spec), I would put a new nut on and torque it to spec. Given that there isn't and left over metal on the stud, like the nut stripped out, I would say it wasn't torqued to spec and worked itself loose. The bang you heard might had been the wheel flinging the nut.


6

tl;dr: No. An impact wrench isn't a cure-all. The mechanic explained that sometimes lug nuts are much over torque because all shops use impact gun to tighten them. That does not cause any problem as long as they are opened using an impact wrench. Well, that's not quite true. Over-torque is bad in and of itself. At a very high level, it damages ...


6

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), that is not a broken lug nut, but the nut which is formed into the plastic hub cap. Take the hub cap off and you'll see the lug nuts. If you notice, there are seven lugs on the hub cap. When you take that off, there will be eight lugs on the wheel itself. This is a standard hub cap for the ...


3

Unbalance tires maybe one of the reason. You may want to go to the shop and have its alignment checked. If they are new, you may have a free check up where you purchased them which i have done before.


2

I can see where your mechanic is coming from. The reason being that, although like Steve Cross notes, the impact wrench applies a lot of force suddenly, it applies the force in an evenly rotational direction. ANY wiggle in the socket (Which there will always be or you wouldn't be able to get it on the nut) and the breaker bar will be putting lateral force ...


2

In order to fit a different size or type of wheel to a car, four things need to be compatible: Pitch Circle Diameter (PCD) - this is the number and distance between the nuts/studs, e.g. 4x100 (4 studs, 100mm diameter). This needs to be the same for both old and new wheels. Centre bore diameter - the size of the hole in the middle of the wheel. If it's too ...


1

It's already well answered here but typically you torque items "under load". Since torque values specify a clamping force you want to be sure that the conditions of the part are most like the "real world" when you set the torque. When I do tires I center the tire and snug down all lugs before putting load back on the suspension and then torquing the lugs. ...



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