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17

Remember that lug nuts are exposed to literally every element that could possibly cause corrosion. It sounds like your last nut is stuck due to some rust or oxidation that you can't see. Here's how I generally approach a badly stuck nut: Check your safety gear: eye protection, jack stands, everything to keep yourself from getting killed when this wheel ...


11

As long as the rest are tight (and torqued to spec), I would put a new nut on and torque it to spec. Given that there isn't and left over metal on the stud, like the nut stripped out, I would say it wasn't torqued to spec and worked itself loose. The bang you heard might had been the wheel flinging the nut.


10

There are a number of things you can do to unstick the nut before turning it: a lubricant or rust blaster. Keep things wet and give it time to work. heat cycling. Heat it up (gently) and let it cool. Repeat. If you oil it up and point a propane torch at it, you may start a fire, so be careful. It's not so important to heat just the nut or just the stud - ...


10

I thought I'd mention this since others haven't. Are they aftermarket wheels? If so, do they have hub-centric rings and did you make sure all the hub-centric rings were on the wheels before installing them on the car? If you're missing a hub ring, it's possible the wheel isn't perfectly centered. The wobble is sometimes very slight and sometimes great, ...


10

Nope, doing it with the wheels on the ground if fine, no need to lift the weight of the wheels. It's easier that way because the wheels can't turn while you are torquing the lugs.


10

Being as it's only 0.05mm larger in diameter, you shouldn't have a problem unless you're using that socket on a rattle-gun every day. If it's a 6-point socket, the wear on the nut should be minimal (12-point sockets have more of a chance at 'rounding' the nut). Ideally, however, you should go down to the shop and spend two dollars on the correct sized ...


10

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


8

tl;dr: No. An impact wrench isn't a cure-all. The mechanic explained that sometimes lug nuts are much over torque because all shops use impact gun to tighten them. That does not cause any problem as long as they are opened using an impact wrench. Well, that's not quite true. Over-torque is bad in and of itself. At a very high level, it damages ...


8

That would be correct. There should be no issue of using the impact with the wheel off the ground. You are exactly right in that the tire should be on the ground when using a breaker bar or tire iron. The reason for this, besides the wheel spinning and you never getting the lug loosened, is because you could torque the car over and cause it to fall off of ...


7

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), that is not a broken lug nut, but the nut which is formed into the plastic hub cap. Take the hub cap off and you'll see the lug nuts. If you notice, there are seven lugs on the hub cap. When you take that off, there will be eight lugs on the wheel itself. This is a standard hub cap for the ...


5

I found this good video of how to do it without removing the hub/knuckle assembly from the vehicle. This is definitely one of those vehicles which engineers did not plan very well. Here's the video on YouTube. In case it is ever removed, here are the steps involved (follow safety protocols): Remove the tire, brake caliper, caliper bracket, and rotor. Clock ...


5

Is it actually a full-out wobble, or just a really hard and fast shake? A wobble that throws your wheel left and right is a fairly big issue... Normally to do with the tightening of the lug-nuts. A rapid shake could be something as small as needing a balance on one or more wheels (weights can sometimes fall off, due to many factors... Dropping the tire too ...


5

If you're trying to use the stock wrench, go out and buy a proper one! I've never seen a stock one that is any use, and some of them are so bad they may as well be made of chocolate... A 4-way wrench is simply a cross-shaped bar with 4 different sizes of socket on the ends. You use the appropriate size one for your nuts, and then have effectively a t-bar, ...


5

These would appear to be "McGard 8-spline" lugs. I don't have direct experience with them, but they appear to come in two sizes: Image from BrandSport Auto Accessories. Never used them, but they had a good diagram. These lugs are commonly called "spline" or "tuner" lugs. They are sold to look sporty (because they are different and cool), provide ...


4

Quite simply, no it is not safe. If a car manufacturers specifications say 5 studs, that's because they've done their homework on the forces involved. Think of the worst case: braking hard while turning sharply on a rough surface. The mass of the car, acting at an acute angle to the rim, comes down on the wheel lugs with a g-force proportional to the ...


4

I'm pretty sure the wheels will not fit. If my research is correct, Nissan's use a 5x114.3 bolt pattern, while the Jetta uses 5x112. Not knowing which vehicle the Nissan rim came off of does not help much. Two other things you need to consider besides the bolt pattern is the offset of the wheel (how it is oriented in regards to the hub mounting point - ...


4

As Bob Cross mentioned, use the breaker bar. I've had to use them to remove brake calipers in the past. In the past, I have not seen such a thing as a breaker bar readily for sale at the hardware stores where I live. I have improvised a breaker bar using one of those metal pipes that are used for running electrical wires. Simply take your ratchet to the ...


4

I agree wholeheartedly with both Ben and Paulster. However, I use a high-power air impact for to tighten, on it's lowest setting, and also have a selection of color "torque stix" with a minimum of three passes (snug, torque, final) while in the air. While not perfect, I think this is a reasonable compromise between my efficiency needs and returning a safe ...


3

Learn from my mistake!! I attempted to use four different chisels to 'counter rotate' the stuck nut. NEVER do this. What happens is that the chisel force drives the annular ring of the lower portion of the nut into the well where the curved face normally sits. You get the rest of the nut finaly chisseled off and you are STUCK with the measley shxxty annular ...


3

Unbalance tires maybe one of the reason. You may want to go to the shop and have its alignment checked. If they are new, you may have a free check up where you purchased them which i have done before.


3

Camber is the angle of the wheel on it's vertical axis - If you have wear on the outside of the tyre, then you have too much positive camber, i.e. the top of the wheel is further out than the bottom - the opposite of the diagram below (from Wikipedia), which shows negative camber. For it to be far enough out to cause such serious problems, I would surmise ...


3

The material of the lugs are not the import thing. Lugs come in various materials such as steel, forged aluminum, or even titanium. The important thing is to make sure you get lugs with the correct thread pitch, thread size, and seat. The seat is very important so the lugs sit properly against the wheel and don't come loose. There are 3 different types of ...


2

Perhaps I'm not understanding, but if you had the wheels "installed" then the person/shop that did that must have used some sort of tool, and if you paid for the lugnuts they should have given you this tool as it usually comes with a kit. Are you sure it's not in the glovebox? That's where I always threw the special socket when I did these kinds of ...


2

Engineers typically design parts to withstand a greater load than they are actually expected to see. This is known as a "factor of safety" and assures the parts won't fail when extenuating circumstances are encountered where the product is stressed beyond the design calculations considered. Given that NASCAR is a very specific type of racing with (...


2

I can see where your mechanic is coming from. The reason being that, although like Steve Cross notes, the impact wrench applies a lot of force suddenly, it applies the force in an evenly rotational direction. ANY wiggle in the socket (Which there will always be or you wouldn't be able to get it on the nut) and the breaker bar will be putting lateral force ...


2

In order to fit a different size or type of wheel to a car, four things need to be compatible: Pitch Circle Diameter (PCD) - this is the number and distance between the nuts/studs, e.g. 4x100 (4 studs, 100mm diameter). This needs to be the same for both old and new wheels. Centre bore diameter - the size of the hole in the middle of the wheel. If it's too ...


2

Going with 3 out of 4 nuts is not a huge deal, especially if the 3 nuts you have are on solid. However I would not suggest doing this long term, 4 out of 4 going to be better, and what happens if you lose another stud at an inconvenient time. Since this is a 2003, I would guess it is time to change the hubs out anyway if you haven't already. I would ...


2

It's already well answered here but typically you torque items "under load". Since torque values specify a clamping force you want to be sure that the conditions of the part are most like the "real world" when you set the torque. When I do tires I center the tire and snug down all lugs before putting load back on the suspension and then torquing the lugs. ...


2

I would start with balancing them, especially since you feel it the most in the steering wheel, and make sure to balance them dynamically not just statically.. also make sure your tires dont have uneven wear like 'lumps'


2

All of the answers work. But what works best for me (esp. on the side of the road!) is a 4 way tire wrench in conjunction with the screw type jack found on all cars. Place the correct size socket on the wheel lug (nut). Position it as close to horizontal as possible. At the other end of the 4 way tire wrench, place your screw type jack and raise the ...



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