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11

Remember that lug nuts are exposed to literally every element that could possibly cause corrosion. It sounds like your last nut is stuck due to some rust or oxidation that you can't see. Here's how I generally approach a badly stuck nut: Check your safety gear: eye protection, jack stands, everything to keep yourself from getting killed when this wheel ...


7

There are a number of things you can do to unstick the nut before turning it: a lubricant or rust blaster. Keep things wet and give it time to work. heat cycling. Heat it up (gently) and let it cool. Repeat. If you oil it up and point a propane torch at it, you may start a fire, so be careful. It's not so important to heat just the nut or just the stud - ...


5

If you're trying to use the stock wrench, go out and buy a proper one! I've never seen a stock one that is any use, and some of them are so bad they may as well be made of chocolate... A 4-way wrench is simply a cross-shaped bar with 4 different sizes of socket on the ends. You use the appropriate size one for your nuts, and then have effectively a t-bar, ...


4

I found this good video of how to do it without removing the hub/knuckle assembly from the vehicle. This is definitely one of those vehicles which engineers did not plan very well. Here's the video on YouTube. In case it is ever removed, here are the steps involved (follow safety protocols): Remove the tire, brake caliper, caliper bracket, and rotor. Clock ...


4

I thought I'd mention this since others haven't. Are they aftermarket wheels? If so, do they have hub-centric rings and did you make sure all the hub-centric rings were on the wheels before installing them on the car? If you're missing a hub ring, it's possible the wheel isn't perfectly centered. The wobble is sometimes very slight and sometimes great, ...


4

As Bob Cross mentioned, use the breaker bar. I've had to use them to remove brake calipers in the past. In the past, I have not seen such a thing as a breaker bar readily for sale at the hardware stores where I live. I have improvised a breaker bar using one of those metal pipes that are used for running electrical wires. Simply take your ratchet to the ...


3

The material of the lugs are not the import thing. Lugs come in various materials such as steel, forged aluminum, or even titanium. The important thing is to make sure you get lugs with the correct thread pitch, thread size, and seat. The seat is very important so the lugs sit properly against the wheel and don't come loose. There are 3 different types of ...


3

Learn from my mistake!! I attempted to use four different chisels to 'counter rotate' the stuck nut. NEVER do this. What happens is that the chisel force drives the annular ring of the lower portion of the nut into the well where the curved face normally sits. You get the rest of the nut finaly chisseled off and you are STUCK with the measley shxxty annular ...


3

Is it actually a full-out wobble, or just a really hard and fast shake? A wobble that throws your wheel left and right is a fairly big issue... Normally to do with the tightening of the lug-nuts. A rapid shake could be something as small as needing a balance on one or more wheels (weights can sometimes fall off, due to many factors... Dropping the tire too ...


2

Camber is the angle of the wheel on it's vertical axis - If you have wear on the outside of the tyre, then you have too much positive camber, i.e. the top of the wheel is further out than the bottom - the opposite of the diagram below (from Wikipedia), which shows negative camber. For it to be far enough out to cause such serious problems, I would surmise ...


2

All of the answers work. But what works best for me (esp. on the side of the road!) is a 4 way tire wrench in conjunction with the screw type jack found on all cars. Place the correct size socket on the wheel lug (nut). Position it as close to horizontal as possible. At the other end of the 4 way tire wrench, place your screw type jack and raise the ...


2

Going with 3 out of 4 nuts is not a huge deal, especially if the 3 nuts you have are on solid. However I would not suggest doing this long term, 4 out of 4 going to be better, and what happens if you lose another stud at an inconvenient time. Since this is a 2003, I would guess it is time to change the hubs out anyway if you haven't already. I would ...


1

Usually, yes. It depends on the shape of the seat (i.e. the bit of the wheel the nut grips against). Steel wheels will always have a tapered nut seat, wheras alloys often have a squared-off one. You might be lucky and find your alloys have the same angle of taper, obviously it depends on the design of the wheel.



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