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12

tl dr - Have no fear of Vaseline and o-rings O-rings are made out of many different materials. I would suggest that those o-rings which are made to work in the automotive realm are made to be resistant to things such as oil, gasoline, and other petroleum products. This would include Vaseline. While Vaseline and other petroleum products may degrade real ...


8

Engine oil is normally kept inside a light-proof steel box (your engine), so you might not find much information on how it's affected by sunlight. However, other industries use lubricating oil that can be exposed to the sun, and I found this report: Sunlight Degradation of Lubricants UV light is the enemy, and it can affect oil: On a molecular level, ...


8

No. As far as I can tell, there is no reason that Vaseline might gradually degrade the rubber O-ring on which it has been applied. O-rings that are manufactured for automotive purposes do tend to be made in a rather durable fashion so as to be able to withstand whatever sort of fluids that might accidentally get spilt during car maintenance. If you are ...


7

Mixing new with the old will cause you absolutely no issues. As long as you are using the same weight oil, it will mix up and you'd never know it. Continue to change your oil at the specified interval and you should be golden.


6

Use the lithium or silicone grease! Copper grease is primarily used to prevent the seizing of parts which become extremely hot, like the exhaust system. But it is not a lubricant in first place. The grease bounds the copper powder, but isn't made for lubrication, an copper powder in a moving bearing can't be good, even though copper is a rather soft metal. ...


6

The piston rings prevent the two from mixing freely. Note that it isn't possible to have the two perfectly isolated from each other. There will be a little bit of oil that gets burned during consumption, and some exhaust gases will find their way into the crankcase. As these rings wear, the amount of oil lost to the combustion chamber increases. If a four-...


5

Specifically a foam filter for a lawn mower needs oiled, but just lightly. A foam filter lacks the ability to stop small particles as compared to a paper filter. The oil is added to make the filter "sticky" to these small particles giving the foam filter better filtering capability. As far as major engine damage, probably not. Worst case scenario the engine ...


4

I would not use assembly lube with the valves (in the valve guides), but just oil there. The reason for this is because there is no way to flush the assembly lube out of this orifice like there is in other places throughout the engine. My preference is to use assembly lube for the rest of the parts. Assembly lube will keep the parts from chafing (wearing ...


4

Lower "cold side" of the Carnot cycle leads to better theoretical efficiency, sure, but have you calculated how much? 10-20 K colder intake with the same 1000 K combustion temperature affect final efficiency by 1%. And that efficiency is 70% in any case, so you can guess that there are so many more parameters lowering the final efficiency to 25%, that the ...


4

Oil Scavenging Rings There are several rings on a piston. Depending on the application and use of the piston it may have up to five ring grooves near the crown. Here are some points of interest. The top ring is always the compression ring. It does prevent some oil from getting involved in the combustion process but it is not it's primary duty. The ...


4

It's fine to run Synthetic Oil with crushed Dinosaurs, which is exactly what 'part-synthetic' oils are - but because the chemistry of the two oils you have is unknown, I wouldn't do it for too long (the TBN - Total Base Number - of the mixture may change in unexpected ways). By running the 'wrong' oil, you're better off than running it with no (or low) oil! ...


3

Two lubes are needed to properly lubricate caliper type brakes. Silicone is used on the slider pins and anything that touches rubber. A generous amount that completely coats the pin, hole wall and rubber expansion boot is needed. Be sure to coat the boot lips that fit in the grooves that hold them in place, this act as a sealant. This lube will not swell ...


3

Usually when changing the oil you won't be able to fully drain the old oil anyways and the old and new oils will mix, like it or not. Usually this is not a problem even if the weights are different, though it's safer to stick with the same brand, as some argue the components in the oil being incompatible may cause issues. What you should be wary of is ...


3

Absolutely. The great thing about having the zerks is when you put fresh grease in, the old grease comes out. With the old grease comes any dirt and grime which may have collected. This should keep your heim joint in good stead. Most heim joints are completely rebuildable, meaning you can take them apart, clean them, regrease, then put them back together. ...


2

Yes the piston rings. The small metallic bands on the piston head.... From the bottom...As the piston rises and drops (compresses) it pulls oil up to help with lubrication. If the rings were not in place it would flood the chamber. Also the rings do expand slightly with heat as does all metal. The top has a "headgasket" preventing oil and water from ...


1

According to the data sheet of "Permatex® Nickel Anti-Seize Lubricant" TYPICAL APPLICATIONS Drop forge dies and hammers, catalyst bed and reaction chamber supports, slow rotating bearings in hot corrosive environments, lubricate and seal pipe threads in acid environments, coat gaskets in high temperature applications, lubricate conveyor ...



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