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9

My wife had a 2000 Civic that had exactly the same "feature". First time I borrowed her car, I thought I broke her door. This is how it comes from the factory and by design. The idea is either you lock the door with your keys while you are outside (keys not locked in) or you lock the door from the inside (keys not locked in). btw, I think you can force ...


5

I'm guessing water in the latch mechanism somewhere. Try displacing the water (when it's above freezing) with some WD-40, let it sit awhile, then lubing with a silicone based lube (not sure if that's the best option, but it's what comes to mind, would like to see other opinions on the best latch lube).


5

If you cannot manually lock the door, the power locks will not work because all it does is move the mechanical linkage. This sounds like the linkage or latch (the lock mechanism is in the latch) is binding on something. Take the door panel off and inspect the linkage and latch. You may have to take the latch out of the door to inspect it close enough.


5

All Honda's have this feature starting in 1988. Its a device that makes it difficult to lock your keys in the car. To lock the door from inside, you have to hold the door opener latch while locking the door and the lock will go all the way down. Read your owners manual. It will be in there.


4

I found the problem, and the solution. @Alex warns against having too much on your keyring because of wear and tear on the cylinder. So I examined the cylinder, inserting/extracting the key, but that seemed to be in smooth working order. Then I looked at the key again, and I discovered that it had a bit of a twist in it. So I got out the pliers and ...


4

Because your key works normally when inserted with a specific side up, I suspect the key will have some wear on one side. Can you closely examine both sides to see if there's any difference between the two sides? Since most of the cars are heaving some sort of anti-theft system with a transponder in the key you cannot just replace your key with one from a ...


4

I have a Focus 2010 model and can confirm that Bobs advise is absolutely right. The same thing happened to me this evening when my passenger door when opened wouldn't latch in again (currently outside temp minus 5c). Just 10 seconds using a hair drier on the latch solved the problem for me. I also then sprayed the mechanism with WD40 for good measure. Had ...


4

It if was freezing outside, it was almost certainly colder inside the latch mechanism. It sounds like ice formed on the spring and / or the latch hinge. You were able to use the leverage of the door handle to move the latch against the friction of the ice but then the spring wasn't able to push it back. When something like this happens, I would suggest ...


4

I strongly recommend a greaseless lubricant (LPS makes a good one, as do other companies). Graphite is technically better, but is very messy and hard to be effective with. I discourage WD-40 / oils as they tend to attract dirt that causes you to need to clean/relube it sooner. I strongly discourage grease and silicone lubes, those make a big mess and lead ...


4

Unfortunately I think this is simply a consequence of living in colder climates. The only long term solution to this problem would be to somehow seal off the locking cylinder from condensation and the elements, which would be nearly impossible to do if the only method of unlocking the door is by physically inserting and turning a key. A word of advice for ...


4

We had the same problem on a late 2005 W169. Note you do not need to remove the door card if you just want to remove the door lock cylinder and exterior handle. Once you've loosened the bolt holding the cylinder accessed from the side of the door (On ours it was a T20 - T15 would work but there's a chance of rounding off the head) there is a catch above the ...


3

Usually the OBD CAN bus is 'bridged' onto the other CAN buses of the vehicle, in order to facilitate diagnostics of ECUs on the other buses. However, the bridge may only pass diagnostic messages onwards :( It's different on every platform. In terms of the protocol - its a classic reverse engineering problem. You need to capture a few traces of the CAN ...


3

Remove the inside door handle and see if the linkage is diconnected.You might be lucky and be able to reattach it if you can retrieve it from inside the door.If not remove the inside door panel you will find a rod has become diconnected between the inside door handle and the latch.It is possible that the handle broke or a retaining clip fell off allowing the ...


3

If you can get through the license plate hole on the left side of the trunk key and simply press down on the back of the latch mechinsm while holding pressure down on the trunk lid it just might open up for you. The lock simply has a small arm that performs the same task. Keep in mind, the key for this lock must be inserted with the smooth side up. The lock ...


2

11 years is pretty old for a key, if you've been using it since the car was new. As keys wear, they cause additional wear on the ignition. It's a good idea to use a fresh key to extend the life of your ignition. When I buy a car, I make copies of the keys and use the copies. The originals go somewhere safe.* When the copies start to wear, I make new copies ...


2

Do you have a workshop manual or parts book for the car? These should at least give you an idea of what the mechanism looks like. The best option I can see would be to find someone else with another Fairlady (is there an owners club?) who would let you have a look at theirs, or email you photos if they aren't local. If you could get access to another car ...


2

Could you not open the door manually with the key? You say the passenger lock spins, but don't mention the one on the driver's door. The most common cause of central locking failing in that fashion is a broken wire, usually where the wires pass through the rubber gaiter between the door and the body - As the wires have to flex every time you open and close ...


2

Pry it with a small screwdriver, it's just a snug fit. This first picture is what that rod is held in with Some latches like the one below have a retaining clip that hooks onto the rod, but your's isn't one of them.


2

If I were the guy who designed the electronics, I would make it impossible to do this via CAN-Bus simply because you get bluetooth adapters for OBD2 that someone standing outside the car could pair with and send the unlock instruction to. It's a safety hazard, so I wouldn't support it.


2

I'd start by checking Fuse#34 (20A) in the driver side underdash fusebox. If that fuse is fine I'd investigate voltage @ the release solenoid itself. Looks like the white/green wire should get 12V when trunk pop is activated. If that signal is good you may have a bad solenoid.


2

The click should be the latch solenoid firing so the signal should be fine I wouldn't think the FOB is the issue. My bet is that the solenoid does not have enough power to disengage the latch try spraying some penetrating oil (WD-40 or similar) onto the latch claw and latch pin to see if that helps loosen it up. If you don't have any penetrating oil you ...


2

There is de-icer you can use. Here is an example from Loctite. Spray it in the lock. It will keep it from sticking as well as ease how much torque it takes to turn the key. If this doesn't help you, there is a mechanical problem with the door linkage.


2

The purpose of turning the wheel one turn is to put the wheels at a cant (other than straight). This is especially important on standard shift vehicles so it cannot just be put into neutral and moved. It just gives one more weapon in the arsenal against car thieves. The action of applying the club should be, before you turn the ignition off, turn the ...


2

It sounds like the lock on your driver's door is stuck (leading to the first symptom), which has led to it constantly sending the "lock" signal to the central locking, causing the second symptom. If you can get the door open, you should be able to disconnect the central locking wiring from the lock to stop it locking the other doors, then investigate why ...


1

My local mechanic has recommended using "white lithium grease" (for example, like this) for things like hinges & locks. It is similar to WD-40 in that it's a spray lubricant, but (apparently) it does its job longer (e.g., doesn't wash off or collect dirt as easily).


1

To open the trunk with the least amount of damage you need to gain access to the latch. This will require taking out the back seat or if you are lucky just folding it down. Once access to the trunk has been achieved you need to activate the latch. Some vehicles have a marked "Emergency Trunk Release" lever. Lacking that you will have to unbolt the latch from ...


1

The Forte LX mode uses a cable setup to work the door locks. While the EX uses rods. It is possible but, it would take some work to figure out a way to connect the door handle (interior) to the lock assembly. Next you would have to find a way to provide these locks with power since the harness is not the same in both models. On the software side both Body ...


1

What you are wanting to do is possible. I've had similar experience and desire for my 2010 Camry. From my experience, reading messages from the OBD-II port wasn't getting me anywhere. It was like the CAN messages were only a response to me manually manipulating the the car. I would get a message response from locking or unlocking the doors with the key ...


1

Even if you connect to the correct bus and broadcast the correct CAN message you still run into the issue, of transmitting a CAN message that is already being transmitted by another ECU. The way CAN works, every can message has an Arbitration ID also referred to as the message id. Under normal operation, no ECU will ever broadcast a message with the same ID ...


1

I just got this same car for my daughter. Same thing: power window button, but no separate button to lock/unlock the doors. However the doors will all sync to the drivers door, at least they're supposed to, using either the key from the outside or the toggle next to the door handle. In our particular case, all the doors will synch to lock, but they're ...



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