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7

As the Wikipedia entry says, one benefit is that they improve visibility of the car. The idea is that they improve the safety of the vehicle. Although: A 2008 study by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration analysed the effect of DRLs on frontal and side-on crashes between two vehicles and on vehicle collisions with pedestrians, ...


6

The short answer is: they're for other people. Here's a practical example: I drive a black car. In the late summer, the trees around my neighborhood really overhang the road and block a lot of the lower-angle sunlight. Also, the roads near my house range from 10-20 residential roads to full highway speeds. So, at a glance, my car doesn't passively give ...


6

Each bulb have some sort of life time expectancy so if two lamps are installed at the same time and one fails after a long period of time you can deduce that the other can be close to failure as well so for security some people and manufacturers ($$$$) recommend replacing both at the same time. The thing is that there is no rule since a lot of factors come ...


5

The cheapest option would be to polish the current light housings. You can get a kit at walmart of at any auto parts store that will allow you to turn foggy (but in otherwise good condition) headlights into much, much clearer lenses. The kits cost $15 to $20, and basically require you to use your drill, some paste, and possibly some water, to wet sand the ...


5

Here is a diagram for the basic 4 wire trailer. Yellow - Left Stop/Turn (the big filament as you described in the left bulb) Green - Right Stop/Turn (the big filament as you described in the right bulb) Brown - Parking/Marker lights (the small filament as you described in both the right and left side bulbs) White - Ground They all hook to the ...


4

Sort of. Older filaments in headlights can be noticeably duller. If you are OCD, it might benefit you. Typically when one bulb goes out, the others that were replaced at the same time are probably near their end of life. Or, perhaps not. I don't replace things that aren't broken. Otherwise, it's just more money for the parts store.


4

This sounds most likely to be a fault in the switch in the indicator stalk - normally you have a physical linkage which keeps the turn indicator flashing while you turn a corner, then it releases as the steering wheel straightens. I can imagine a couple of ways this could fail and allow the spring in that mechanical return to perhaps trigger the right ...


4

There are only a few parts in play here. The reverse light switch in/on the transmission, the wiring to the rear of the vehicle, the tail lamp assembly, and the lightbulb itself. I would check the bulb first. If the filament is broken in just the right way, it can cause the flashing symptoms that you're experiencing. The part number for the bulb is 3156 ...


3

As Peter mentioned the primary benefit is safety by making your vehicle more visible to others. Therefore, it is more useful in a city than a rural area where you would have more people who need to see your vehicle. Another advantage of daytime running lights, is that insurance companies typically give a discount on vehicles equipped with this option.


3

My mom's Prius HID bulb died (under warranty) so she took it in to get it replaced. The dealer replaced one of the bulbs and it was a completely different color than the original. I finally bought her two new bulbs from Amazon and replaced them for her because it was so bothersome. In a situation like that it is definitely worth it to replace both at the ...


3

It's called a Center High Mount Stop Lamp (CHMSL) or sometimes a Center High Mount Brake Lamp (CHMBL). If you can't find a Web site with part numbers, you could go to the parts counter at a Mazda dealer and ask them to look up the part number(s). They can tell you whether it's all one piece or not. I don't know how to take the light apart in your car. Your ...


3

Turned out when I whacked the dimmer switch for the dash lights and the speedometer etc section came to life (back-light came on). Clock is still not working but if I spend a bit more time on that I should be able establish what's wrong, I may have actually blown the back-light bulb for it. (I will update)


2

I had the same problem.. but when i shoved the gear shifter into reverse hard and shook it hard it flashed. So what i had to do was take my dremmel and grind the part of the switch base below the threads down to allow the threads to screw further into the transmition. I took off about an 1/8 of an inch and Now everything works as advertised.. :-)


2

I am showing that vehicle to already take these halogen bulbs. If you have sealed beams and you want to upgrade the lights you can try for example Hella Lights.


2

You're exactly correct in that thinking (I replaced the bulbs in my old Volvo once and it caused it to think they were out because the bulb was slightly different (these weren't even LED's; just a different filament or connector or something, I forget; no tolerance at all on that circuit). I don't know if there's a standard way to fix this (other than use ...


2

As fog lights are physically different to 'ordinary' ones, you will have to swap bulbs and wires - my assumption is that the reversing light is in the equivalent position on the other side. If your light housings are transparent, then this is as simple as opening up the housing, swapping the bulbs over and swapping the wires over (either in the boot/trunk ...


2

I checked the Bosch,Phillips and Sylvania websites they all list highoutput or premium lamps. I can't give you a specif reccomendation because they list many options depending on which country you are in and what it came with stock. The lamps you have may already be the brightest available. I would check these sites, input the information and compare them to ...


2

Cycling HID lamps the way you propose will reduce the lifespan of the bulbs, they aren't made to be turned back on shortly after being turned off. Also, I'm having trouble making sense of your schematic - the oval labeled "LIGHTS" - is that supposed to represent the ballast? I don't know that I'd power that directly from your H4, seems like I'd want a new ...


2

The first question is easy to answer - find your local automotive parts supplier and they will be able to look up and supply the correct bulb type for you. I would expect it to be either H1 or H3. Getting to the bulb is often harder - it varies a lot by car. I think the Focus is a more traditional design, so hopefully you can get to it without having to ...


2

In the end, the VW dealer ended up having it over a week. Initially they thought there was a parasitic leak because they had put a new battery in my car and nothing happened for a few days but then one morning the lights were on. They did some more research and ended up finding out that there was moisture in my dash that was causing the lights to trip, ...


2

Check the owners manual page for fuses and relays diagram. It is possible that you have a bad headlight relay (if Jettas have them). It may be for the headlights or the DRL also known as daytime running lights. You may be able to swap it with a similar relay that serves another function. Use a relay that is not safety related such as power windows rather ...


1

Got this sorted in the end. For this specific model of car (EU spec Ford Focus MK1 [1998 to 2004 in Europe]) the bulb sizes are going to be H4 or H7, depending on whether you need a double filament bulb. The easiest way to tell before you start taking stuff apart is simply look in the head lamp - if you have three bulbs in there, you need H7 and if you only ...


1

It is most likely NOT your alternator. Everything is going to dim in the car when the idle drops down to 500rpm because the alternator cannot put out enough juice to keep things up to snuff. To check it, have someone keep the engine up over 1000 rpm while you put a multi-meter on the battery terminals. Voltage should be around 13.5-14.1 vdc. When you say ...


1

I believe it can be looked at like this: When you have a turn signal bulb go out it causes the other to blink almost twice as fast. Since LED's use much less power, then it stands to reason that by switching to LED's you are not using the expected amount of amps to light the LED's hence, the system see's this as a burnt out bulb.


1

Thanks to some helpful people here and on the Australian 4wd forums and a local gearbox repair place I have found a solution. Apparently the gearbox the the MJ Triton uses a ball bearing above the reverse switch. The gearbox pushes it down (pushing the switch) when in forwards gears which opens the circuit and turns the lights off. In reverse it lifts up ...


1

Thanks to some helpful people here and on the Australian 4wd forums and a local gearbox repair place I have found a solution. Apparently the gearbox the the MJ Triton uses a ball bearing above the reverse switch. The gearbox pushes it down (pushing the switch) when in forwards gears which opens the circuit and turns the lights off. In reverse it lifts up ...


1

I believe there is a procedure to deciper OBD faults on the VQ35DE motor without any additional hardware - this allows you to count the # of times the CEL blinks to determine a wide variety of fault codes. I'll try to post it when i find it. Also, there are inexpensive OBD2 bluetooth dongles that will let you pull faults very easily. Until you do this, ...


1

The rules you are after are the road vehicle lighting regulations 1989 (link). Particularly this page. Unfortunatly, as usual, they are pretty vague: Such that the lamp or lamps are capable of adequately illuminating the rear registration plate and An approval mark I can't see any minimum rating there - I don't think any are specified in ...


1

It's commonly called a third brake light, although the William Cline listed the more technical terms for them. You can find several used ones at car-part.com prices range from $20 - $50 You will need to replace the assembly you cannot replace just one of the bulbs.


1

Check the bulb as mentioned here by JeremyP it's quick and easy to eliminate, but it's unlikely because only one of the bulbs would go out if that's the case. Next set the parking brake, ignition on, trans in reverse. The lights should be working. Now wiggle the wiring harness from the switch where it comes out of the transmission as far up as you can reach ...



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