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3

Ok, I think I see two questions in here: How to identify where the leak is coming from, and Are there good alternatives to just replacing the pump. For the first question one of the cooler (as in you feel smug and your friends think you're amazing) ways to approach this to dye the power steering fluid with a dye that is UV fluorescent and then use a UV ...


2

I used the 2-part putty stick to repair the leaking tank on my 1968 Firebird, while it was actively leaking. I backed into a parking stop and bumped the tank, when it shifted a bit it caused pinholes where the support strap was contacting the tank. I was young and broke, so I never had a chance to replace the tank. The putty repair lasted 1 1/2 years until I ...


1

If you've had an accident of some kind there could be damage anywhere on the tank, and that damage might not be apparent. There could be cracks or distortion which weaken it and later cause a catastrophic failure. So to be sure you have a complete repair you would need to get it out of the car so all the damage could be found in the first place. Also, you'd ...


1

I wouldn't repair a gas tank. If the repair fails, it's going to be leaking gas, and I don't want to be sitting too near the tank when that happens. $2,000 sounds very expensive to supply and install a gas tank. Get several quotes from other mechanics, including a local dealer.


5

Long story short, yes it is an option. Whether or not it's a good one is another discussion. Good News: finding a replacement gas tank and having a competent mechanic replace it shouldn't cost anywhere near $2000. Especially if you find the gas tank yourself. I'd be curious to know how your mechanic intends to fix your gas tank and add up his services to a ...


1

You could try the standard leak test: Mix some water with dishwashing soap in 1:1 mix and apply it to any surface that could harbor a leak. Bubbles appear at the site of the leak.


2

I'd say hyd lifter failure is pretty unlikely unless you ran your engine to extremely high RPM's right before this started. A leaking exhaust manifold can produce a sharp and short puff of exhaust that sounds like a tick. (Happened on my '92 Mustang often) If you can reach your manifold bolts, trying tightening them a little. They will definitely have actual ...


8

Seeing as how your car has a turbo, the only place it would be leaking and you'd hear a ticking noise is pre-turbo, so the exhaust manifold at the head (header) and the down pipe on the hot side to the turbo. The turbo, due to it's nature of homogenizing the exhaust flow, will pretty much eliminate any ticking noise which may be due to an exhaust leak. While ...


2

Depends on what you consider easy. It's possible to fill your system and then spray the entire ac system down with soapy water to watch for air bubbles escaping from the lines, but this is a tedious task. There are cans of refrigerant with uv dye placed in them also, so what you can do is fill your system with one of the uv dye cans and then drive around for ...



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