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15

My wife had a similar problem on her car and it turned out the problem was the wheel, not the tire. We'd had enough sand and salt on the road this winter that she had corrosion / gunk building up right at the bead. The tire shop dismounted the tires, cleaned up the seating area on the wheel and then remounted the tire. The problem now seems to be solved.


10

The most likely cause is the a/c unit. What may have happened is that debris, pine needles,leaves etc may have plugged the drain allowing an excess amount of water to build up and then it relaesed. Run the a/c unit for awhile say 30 minutes. In a safe area like an empty parking lot make some abrubt turns at slow speeds. If you hear water sloshing under the ...


8

I fixed a leak in my coolant tank (which is the exact same plastic) using a few strips of plastic* cut from a spray bottle I bought at a hardware store. You can either use a heat gun or a soldering iron to melt the plastic into place. Just be careful of burning the plastic. This video is a good guide. Even though it's a much larger tank, the technique is ...


6

It is actually really difficult to top this up yourself - the easiest route is in through the transmission dipstick, so you'll need a long funnel. First, find the dipstick - it will be inwards and down below the fuel filter (your manual should show you where) - it will have a yellow circle at the end, for your finger to pull it out. Then see how full the ...


6

My experience is that Chrome is the worst possible case, either aluminum/alloy or steel should be much better. :-)


5

If you are willing to drain the coolant, most radiators can be brazed or welded to fix pinholes.


5

Sly's technique is a good one for diagnosing leaks, but you may find it difficult to spot if the leak is too small. If you have a persistent leak on one particular wheel, it may be that there is some corrosion or foreign particle contamination on the inside of the wheel rim - this prevents the tyre from sealing properly against the rim and allows the air to ...


4

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst ...


4

I used to work at a big chain tire store, and chrome going bad on wheels is pretty common. Sometimes the chrome finish lasts for awhile and sometimes it goes bad within a few years. I personally would not use chrome rims since chrome eventually goes bad. We used to temporarily fix a leaking chrome wheel by taking a wire brush to the chrome where the tire ...


4

Easiest way to diagnose leaks is to use something like Windex. Spray it on the tire and around the rim. If you see any bubbles, that's where the air is leaking from.


4

If it were mine and I could get by with one to two charges a season (3 - 4 months) I wouldn't do anything but that, and I can fix it myself. Once it gets worse than that I would fix it. Get another shop to check it out, play dumb as if you don't already know. Because evaporator leaks can sometimes be tricky to diagnosis. Once more than one shop agrees it's ...


4

You'll need some sort of a tank where you can submerge the entire wheel/tire - a small pool will do, although if you're in the northern hemisphere that might be a bit of a challenge this time of the year. Put the whole wheel underwater, and see if you can spot any bubbles. I have seen some shops that have a tank they can put part of the wheel/tire into, ...


4

It's definitely possible. My choice for a repair like this would be JB Weld, but I would think lots of products would do fine, though I'd be skeptical of any kind of caulk that's not going to bond tightly to the plastic.


3

Check the condition of the filler pipe. I had a '93 Volkswagen Polo on which that pipe rusted through, leading to the same symptoms you mention - it ran behind the wing in such a way that the gap filled with mud and trapped moisture against the pipe, causing it to corrode prematurely. A lot of cars also incorporate a rubber hose as part of either filler or ...


3

The gas tanks are usually in the rear, and when you fill them to the brim they can leak out of the: Evaporation system ports Fuel fill hose joints Out of the gas cap if it expands enough The tank itself What side is your fuel door on?


3

As a general rule, high pressure hoses will have crimped connections on them. The small clamp connectors are on the pump feed and return hoses, which are low pressure lines. They typically don't leak as often as the high pressure ones do. The high pressure line, according to the diagram you posted, comes from the PS pump and enters the rack. There is a ...


3

Definitely try isolating the wheel. I spent quite a long time with a previous car trying tires and valve stems and mounting issues. Eventually I replaced the tires and still had the same problem on the same wheel, and replaced the wheel, and it was fine after that. In my case it would take 2 to 3 weeks to get low, so it was a fairly small leak. My tire ...


3

The refrigerant in your Grand Cherokee is R-134a. It won't damage the ozone layer like the old R-12 would, but it's a potent greenhouse gas. See: http://www.roadandtrack.com/column/a-c-the-ec-and-global-warming I'm not aware of any part of the car that will be harmed mechanically by ignoring the leak and simply recharging the A/C intermittently.


3

I think you are correct in diagnosing this as condensation. Please don't taste anything that comes out of your car! Here are my suggestions for confirming that hypothesis: Put down a big sheet of butcher paper (or similar cheap light colored paper that will show leaks) on a dry spot where you will be parking after running the AC for a while. Pull the car ...


3

The only real problem I see is damage to the compressor. The system has oil in it that keeps the part lubricated, and leaks sometimes allow for oil to escape. If you are recharging, and not planing on repairing, ask where the oil level indicator is. Ensuring that the system has oil is the key, because as the freon escapes air replaces it, so you are always ...


3

If you can figure out how to check your transmission fluid level and top it off if it needs it, do so. It may already be too late to be able to drive it to a mechanic, that's a risk you'll need to assess.


3

Bank 1 on your 3800 Series II Engine would be the set of cylinders that is closer to the front bumper of the vehicle (cylinders 1, 3, 5). Bank 2 (cylinders 2, 4, 6) would be against the firewall. The Leak... Any vacuum-leak hunt shouldn't start without having a clear vacuum-hose diagram in-hand. There should be one on a placard inside the engine bay ...


2

One popular possibility is oil leaking past the rear main seal when running, accumulating in the transmission's bellhousing, and then draining from there when parked. Happens a lot when rear mains start to leak. Oil around the rear of the oil pan, on the bottom of the transmission are all good signs of this.


2

All sorted. As Timo said, there was loads of corrosion and Radweld wouldn't have stood a chance! The VAG part number is 037121065H. I initially got 037121065L but it didn't have a port for the heated inlet manifold!


2

Unmount your tire from your car using the Jack and wrench provided, full it with air, and then put it in a large tub of water, a bath tub will work if you dont mind a tire being in it, could get messy. but just slowly put the tire in, not all the way, just enough so that one side is in, then let the water settle, see if bubbles are coming from the tire or ...


2

A loss of 2-3 pounds a month is reasonable. This will vary with ambient temperature changes. If the outside temp. is 75 degrees when the tire is filled and 30 degrees when it is rechecked the loss may be more. Conversely if the tire is filled when it is 30 degrees and rechecked at 75 degrees it may be higher. Tire pressure should be checked monthly. Many ...


2

The problem did end up being the fuel pump. Checked wires and fuses, but in the end it was a bad pump. The filter was also replaced, and can probably be blamed for the pump failing.


2

I would go ahead and replace both the valve and the o-ring. Also, you most likely have the R134a, as this has become the standard for automobile Acs for the time being. As far as getting the right parts? Try calling Jeep, and getting some part numbers. When you get down to specific small items like these, I doubt aftermarket parts are available. Once ...


2

The problem you describe with new tyres on alloy wheels can happen if the lacquer (shiny finish) on the wheel has become oxidised over time. When fitting the tyre, the bead seating on the rim should be pristine. If there is any oxidisation, bubbling or bumps, on the wheels bead seating it must be removed. With a rotary wire brush the bead seating should be ...


2

I'd suggest you're right in your diagnosis and, yes, it should be safe to drive on a minimal basis. The only issue you might see is a check engine light due to the tank not being sealed completely. Also, your fuel will absorb more water than it would otherwise, though this will still be only a small amount. Be careful while fueling and get the repair done as ...



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