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18

My wife had a similar problem on her car and it turned out the problem was the wheel, not the tire. We'd had enough sand and salt on the road this winter that she had corrosion / gunk building up right at the bead. The tire shop dismounted the tires, cleaned up the seating area on the wheel and then remounted the tire. The problem now seems to be solved.


15

What you are more than likely seeing is condensation from your A/C unit. The drain for these are usually located on the passenger side of the car about where the firewall is at (just behind the engine). This is completely normal.


13

The most likely cause is the a/c unit. What may have happened is that debris, pine needles,leaves etc may have plugged the drain allowing an excess amount of water to build up and then it relaesed. Run the a/c unit for awhile say 30 minutes. In a safe area like an empty parking lot make some abrubt turns at slow speeds. If you hear water sloshing under the ...


9

I fixed a leak in my coolant tank (which is the exact same plastic) using a few strips of plastic* cut from a spray bottle I bought at a hardware store. You can either use a heat gun or a soldering iron to melt the plastic into place. Just be careful of burning the plastic. This video is a good guide. Even though it's a much larger tank, the technique is ...


8

On most bikes the carb has an overflow port that drains through a tube to the ground. This is important if the float sticks. Usually you can tap the float bowl with a screwdriver and unstick it, but if it happens again, overhaul the carbs. Also, don't smoke around a bike that's dripping gas.


8

Seeing as how your car has a turbo, the only place it would be leaking and you'd hear a ticking noise is pre-turbo, so the exhaust manifold at the head (header) and the down pipe on the hot side to the turbo. The turbo, due to it's nature of homogenizing the exhaust flow, will pretty much eliminate any ticking noise which may be due to an exhaust leak. While ...


7

It is actually really difficult to top this up yourself - the easiest route is in through the transmission dipstick, so you'll need a long funnel. First, find the dipstick - it will be inwards and down below the fuel filter (your manual should show you where) - it will have a yellow circle at the end, for your finger to pull it out. Then see how full the ...


7

Bank 1 on your 3800 Series II Engine would be the set of cylinders that is closer to the front bumper of the vehicle (cylinders 1, 3, 5). Bank 2 (cylinders 2, 4, 6) would be against the firewall. The Leak... Any vacuum-leak hunt shouldn't start without having a clear vacuum-hose diagram in-hand. There should be one on a placard inside the engine bay (...


7

It depends on whether you are paying him to rebuild the replacement engine, or to just fit it as it is...


7

This NIH (National Institutes of Health) Study monitoring CO inside the cabin of a vehicle during commutes over an extended period has some pretty interesting data. From the study the mean CO concentration was 9.8 ppm, with a standard deviation of 5.8 ppm Here is another study Here is another study that reflects older data ('80's and '90's) sampled ...


7

They may not have bled your cooling system properly As a possibility, if you had air trapped in your cooling system it would expand as the engine approached operating temperature. It would eventually, hopefully, make it's way into your radiator where the air would get released into the overflow tank by a valve that opens with higher pressures. As the ...


7

JB Weld is gasoline resistant. I would disassemble the carburetor and inspect suspicious cracked components prior to applying any epoxy to the surfaces. Ensure components are absolutely clean inspect gasket surfaces for anomalies and remediate any issues you find validate suspected cracks Back when I used to do this sort of thing to keep something on ...


7

The easiest way is to check is to jack the wheel up (put it on a jackstand), take the wheel off, clean off the affected areas with brake cleaner, then have a second person push on the brake pedal hard to observe where the leak is coming from. If the fluid is up onto the brake line, I'd suggest this is actually the source of your leak. It could also be ...


6

You'll need some sort of a tank where you can submerge the entire wheel/tire - a small pool will do, although if you're in the northern hemisphere that might be a bit of a challenge this time of the year. Put the whole wheel underwater, and see if you can spot any bubbles. I have seen some shops that have a tank they can put part of the wheel/tire into, ...


6

My experience is that Chrome is the worst possible case, either aluminum/alloy or steel should be much better. :-)


6

I appears to be coming from the front and the center of the engine. I could be a hose near the water pump. The water pump itself may have failed. Most water pumps have a weep hole that drips when the seals fail. It is on the bottom of the pimp and difficult to see. You may be able to feel it by reaching under the pump, it is a small hole about half the ...


6

There are several places water can get into the cabin of a car, some of the more typical are: Through tired door and window seals. Through drain holes in the floor. Condensation from your breath and/or the air-conditioning system. brought in on your shoes, clothing etc. through rust holes, missing bungs, etc. Explicit leaks would result in more water ...


6

Radiators are pretty simple to replace. If you've never done it before, look at some youtube videos, and set aside about 4 hours for it (90 minutes, if you're handy with a spanner). Repairs on radiators are rarely successful - it's often a plastic sidewall that goes on Subarus. Sticking various concoctions in the radiator (or a raw egg) just causes extra - ...


5

If you are willing to drain the coolant, most radiators can be brazed or welded to fix pinholes.


5

As a general rule, high pressure hoses will have crimped connections on them. The small clamp connectors are on the pump feed and return hoses, which are low pressure lines. They typically don't leak as often as the high pressure ones do. The high pressure line, according to the diagram you posted, comes from the PS pump and enters the rack. There is a ...


5

Sly's technique is a good one for diagnosing leaks, but you may find it difficult to spot if the leak is too small. If you have a persistent leak on one particular wheel, it may be that there is some corrosion or foreign particle contamination on the inside of the wheel rim - this prevents the tyre from sealing properly against the rim and allows the air to ...


5

Nick C pointed some good things to look but forgave one important thing in my opinion. First let me ask you a question : Do you have many trees near your house/where you park your car or near the parking at work? If so my bet would be clogged drain from the bottom of your windshield. In my short experience with car all the time a car was leaking inside this ...


5

There are three places I can think the water would be flowing out of from the back area of the engine. The engine in your Yukon should be the GenI Small Block Chevrolet (SBC) engine (I believe they started putting LSx motors in them in 1999). The SBC has water passages through the intake manifold at the front and back of the engine. If one of these passages ...


5

Getting them to break loose is the biggest challenge. I use a good penetrate, soak them several times over 3-4 days, use brake line wrenches to turn the nuts to prevent rounding the brake line nuts, as they are soft steel. Cheap brake line wrenches will round the nuts, buy good quality wrenches of the proper size, metric or american. Use a wrench on the ...


5

This solution applied to my '82 Oldsmobile back in the day. I suspect you might have a similar situation. The windshield on that car was actually glued onto the front of the frame with a black urethane glue, it also rests on a couple of metal tabs that keep the windshield from sliding down. When they replaced my windshield the put too much glue on the ...


5

Long story short, yes it is an option. Whether or not it's a good one is another discussion. Good News: finding a replacement gas tank and having a competent mechanic replace it shouldn't cost anywhere near $2000. Especially if you find the gas tank yourself. I'd be curious to know how your mechanic intends to fix your gas tank and add up his services to a ...


4

Definitely try isolating the wheel. I spent quite a long time with a previous car trying tires and valve stems and mounting issues. Eventually I replaced the tires and still had the same problem on the same wheel, and replaced the wheel, and it was fine after that. In my case it would take 2 to 3 weeks to get low, so it was a fairly small leak. My tire ...


4

My bike does this every couple of years after storage over winter. I have found that the float obsorbs some fuel and thus the level overfills. I have adjusted it some (hard to get right on mine) but the best bet for me was to replace the float. Either way, it should NOT drip or leak fuel. I have not seen any BMW at the shop I worked at leak except as I ...


4

I think you are correct in diagnosing this as condensation. Please don't taste anything that comes out of your car! Here are my suggestions for confirming that hypothesis: Put down a big sheet of butcher paper (or similar cheap light colored paper that will show leaks) on a dry spot where you will be parking after running the AC for a while. Pull the car ...


4

If it were mine and I could get by with one to two charges a season (3 - 4 months) I wouldn't do anything but that, and I can fix it myself. Once it gets worse than that I would fix it. Get another shop to check it out, play dumb as if you don't already know. Because evaporator leaks can sometimes be tricky to diagnosis. Once more than one shop agrees it's ...



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