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17

I looked into this, and it turns out that almost all aspects of starting or turning off a car are governed by a federal requirements document called FMVSS 114. Things that are in there: Steering wheel lock That little button you have to squeeze on the gear shifter to take it out of park Can't remove key unless you are in park Vehicle can't roll when key is ...


14

As JPhi1618 mentioned, this functionality centers around CFR 571.114, AKA FMVSS 114. Specifically section 5.2.1 which states: Except as specified in S5.2.3, the starting system required by S5.1 must prevent key removal when tested according to the procedures in S6, unless the transmission or gear selection control is locked in “park” or becomes locked in ...


8

There may be other reasons but without a doubt a big part of it is because it's impossible to predict under what conditions the car no longer detects the key. And as stated in some of the comments, that could be while driving down the highway, or on the street at just the wrong moment. Hope that helps!


6

Nothing. It could work exactly the same as a keyed ignition, in which case your starter motor would engage, but manufacturers (and I think this is true for all) have added a simple piece of logic which only engages the starter if the engine is not already running. This would be the ideal solution for keyed ignition as well, but it has only been in ...


5

Your concern is valid. This article gives a good description of the weakness of smart keys. A man in the middle attack can fool the car to think that the key is inside allowing it to start. Once the car is running it won't shut off if the key leaves the car. These keys are battery powered and if that battery dies while you are driving on the highway it may ...


5

Not a specific answer for a Toyota Prius, but: This summer, we had an incident here in Germany, where the motor stopped after throwing the key out of the window. There's an online police report, so this is not a hoax. Here is my short translation: A 33 year old mother was driving her VW Passat on the highway (German "Autobahn") A1 near Lübeck with her ...


4

You have a flat battery - use either a charger or a jump-start from another car (there are plenty of questions on here and guides elsewhere as to how to jump start) to charge the battery.


3

No, it will not stop mid-ride. It will warn you the key is no longer in the car, but as long as you don't turn it off, it will keep running until you run out of gas or the car battery dies. It would be a safety hazard for it to randomly die, or even a slow turn off. Imagine if you were on a 65mph high way when it happens, or in the middle of an intersection. ...


3

Here's a good reference for the problem you seem to be having: Program Spare Key FOB The vehicle must be OFF. Open the rear compartment. Place a known key fob within the interior of the vehicle. At the rear of the vehicle insert the vehicle key in the rear compartment lock cylinder located in the lower left and cycle the key 5 times within 5 ...


2

The only way to do this is to have the keys programmed to the car. The only way to do that is to take it to the dealership. They have the necessary tools which are proprietary. Only they have them. Yes, it's a racket.


2

Looking online, the only difference I see as to what you are doing and what is suggested is to turn the key eight times within 10 seconds. It may be you are not getting all of the key turns in within the allotted time. For the entire sequence, the following steps are applicable (so others know when looking): Have all transmitters available before starting, ...


2

I believe that it requires a scan tool. This link is for a 2005 Cobalt, but it should be the same as a 2006. Also, according to eHow: Some vehicles, such as the Chevrolet Cobalt, Pontiac G6 and Chevrolet Malibu, do not have programmable remote systems.


2

Please also note that the entry code cannot be reprogrammed. It is more-or-less burned into the module. This is true of all fords. This module is called a GEM or RAP, depending on your model and vintage. GEM - Generic Electronics Module RAP - Remote AntiTheft Personality SJB - Smart Junction Box Early 90's fords, anti-theft and Keyless entry was a ...


2

Ford has the code in a few different places depending on year and model, but I think for a 2004 F150, it is on the back wall behind the drivers seat. They also sometimes write it out on the lock module itself. Hope that helps a little.


2

Older Honda keyfobs have a US quarter sized circle on the back with a groove in it. Stick a quarter (or your equivalently sized currency) in the groove and use it like a screwdriver. It will probably have an arrow on it, but if not anti-clockwise is the correct way to turn it. It will turn about ¼ of the way around and then you can pop it out (slap it ...


2

All the fobs I have had contain a small watch battery. They seem to last longer than I keep the car. I have had them last 7 or 8 years.


2

According to this source it's possible to program door lock/unlock with a $35 "blank" remote. The immobiliser part of it is unfortunately a bit more high tech (like you would hope). All you need to do is a set sequence with the ignition and remote to reprogram it. I'm not sure if the model's of the fit remote they are talking about and your 2011 are ...


2

According to this website: There is no onboard programming procedure for this vehicle. This vehicle requires special equipment be connected to the vehicle to program the keyless remote. Try a locksmith before the dealership, they are usually 50% the cost. You'll have to purchase a replacement key/fob (or two) and then take it somewhere to have it ...


2

Since the key-less entry system operates via wireless signals without physical contact to the ignition system.... You may be able to use tinfoil to cover the key so that the signal that the key puts out may not be boosted. The key-less systems seem very similar to RFID cards if not the same. I think that they have RFID technology in Europe for awhile now. ...


2

That is a dealer ID tag. The salesman and managers use it to check keys in and out. They should have taken it off of the key before they handed it to you. If you don't want it, just take it off and throw it away (if the dealership sucked) or take it off and return it if you feel extra nice. EDIT: Here is the webpage for them. Their claim is inventory ...


1

It is pure and simple a safety thing. The American law given above doesn't spell it out explicitly, but that is the goal of the given regulations - prevent accidental shutoffs while the vehicle is in motion so as to avoid potentially fatal accidents. In Germany, the law is much the same though from what I've heard the phrasing is more explicit - the cars ...


1

Please also note that the entry code cannot be reprogrammed. It is more-or-less burned into the module. This is true of all fords. This module is called a GEM or RAP, depending on your model and vintage. GEM - Generic Electronics Module. RAP - Remote AntiTheft Personality If you wish to change the code, you have to replace this module to do so.


1

If your car did not come with a keyless entry system whatsoever (as in no fob or buttons) you can purchase an aftermarket keyless entry system to install in your car. If you have power locks it will be easier to install. Shop around at dealerships and local vehicle audio shops. Often, a dealership will charge several times what a local shop will charge to ...


1

This sounds very much like a 'dry' solder joint on the battery connector. If you're a dab hand with a soldering iron, go to and re-solder the battery contacts. If not, go see your local watchmaker or IT hobbyist who should be able to solder for you. If it's just a surface carbon buildup, try a cleaner like 'CO Contact Cleaner'


1

I had the same problem - only worked very close to the ignition column. I soldered two thin wires from the battery to the board, and hey presto - fixed! The problem seems to be worn out pads on the board where the battery spring make contact.


1

There are two things I can think of. First, the car might have lost the remote. Meaning that it no longer recognizes that the remote and must relearn it (through programming or whatever). Second, it could just be that the remote is broken and no longer works. Do you have other remotes which work? Is there an indicator light on the remote showing it is ...


1

You need specialized equipment to break the encryption. The equipment will cost more than simply taking it to a dealer or remote and alarm specialist and having them do it. It's not an overly complicated job, but the equipment makes it infeasible.


1

The contacts on your key fob could be loose or corroded, preventing good contact with your battery. Most likely, it is corrosion on the terminals inside the battery tray. You can clean that out by using a pencil eraser or some fine Emory cloth on the Positive (+) and Negative (-) terminals. Sometimes, the metal tab that keeps the battery in electrical ...


1

Early keyless ignitions vary by manufacturer, but most don't just let you turn the car off. Typically it's a 3-5 second hold. All the OEM keyless ignition buttons are software controlled, they aren't directly connected to the starter. Due to recent "unintended acceleration" events and hoo-haa, a standard "3 second hold" has become the norm. I think even a ...


1

If you just push it, nothing. It would be rather hazardous if you could find yourself without engine power just by bumping a button. If you hold it down for some time (e.g. 3 seconds on a Lexus (pg 117)), it'll shut off the engine, same as turning the key to off on a conventional ignition.



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