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17

I looked into this, and it turns out that almost all aspects of starting or turning off a car are governed by a federal requirements document called FMVSS 114. Things that are in there: Steering wheel lock That little button you have to squeeze on the gear shifter to take it out of park Can't remove key unless you are in park Vehicle can't roll when key is ...


14

As JPhi1618 mentioned, this functionality centers around CFR 571.114, AKA FMVSS 114. Specifically section 5.2.1 which states: Except as specified in S5.2.3, the starting system required by S5.1 must prevent key removal when tested according to the procedures in S6, unless the transmission or gear selection control is locked in “park” or becomes locked in ...


9

I believe your Elantra has a switch under the hood which detects if it is latched or not. All of the doors, trunk lid/rear hatch, and hood must be closed or the "beep" will not occur. Since you stated the hood was somewhat smashed, it may not be "closing" the switch telling it the hood is down. In other words, your car's security system may be operating ...


8

There may be other reasons but without a doubt a big part of it is because it's impossible to predict under what conditions the car no longer detects the key. And as stated in some of the comments, that could be while driving down the highway, or on the street at just the wrong moment. Hope that helps!


7

Seems a horn was damaged. Some cars use the vehicle's horn to "beep" as a response. Others use a separate horn. Pop the hood and look in the front grille area. Use the diagram below to guide you. Do the following: Check the horn connector. Is it fully connected? Is the horn connector broken? Is the horn itself broken? A smashed horn might still work at ...


5

That is a dealer ID tag. The salesman and managers use it to check keys in and out. They should have taken it off of the key before they handed it to you. If you don't want it, just take it off and throw it away (if the dealership sucked) or take it off and return it if you feel extra nice. EDIT: Here is the webpage for them. Their claim is inventory ...


4

You need to find a way to open the door, slim jim or other tool. Once the door is open you need to remove the lock cylinder to get the broken key out. Depending on the vehicle how hard or easy this is. The cylinder may have been damaged and would need replaced and re-pinned to your key, this would require a locksmith. If you can remove the lock cylinder ...


4

I have had a similar issue with remote controls before. Just for completeness, I've already listed two things you've already tried -- they're primarily for anyone who reads this some time in the future. Replace the battery You already know this one, but it's the easiest and most typical fix. It's also pretty inexpensive, so a good thing to try. If you get ...


4

A pretty safe fuse protected accessory circuit in your car is the one that powers your audio system. According to this information, you're looking for the following wires: Car Radio Switched 12v+ Wire: Violet Car Radio Ground Wire: Black By tapping into these wires, you can safely add a low power accessory circuit. Alternatively, if you need more ...


3

The short answer is you can't. A new key needs to be purchased and programmed at the dealer. There is no simple way around this.


3

The smart key system you are referring to is specifically designed to work at very short distances requiring the key to be inside the car before it would start. When i worked at Mazda on cars with smart keys, the car had 4 antennas just to make the system work seamlessly with the short range in mind. There was an antenna in each front door and the trunk to ...


3

I found this information on a Toyota forum. It is from Toyota TSB dated November 9, 2007 (TSB#EL009-07). It works with a lot of different Toyota models for 2007-2008 and may work for yours as well. (NOTE: If it doesn't work, let me know and I'll delete this answer). It appears fairly complicated and time critical (time during/between steps needs to be done ...


3

I accidentally ran the smart key for my '09 Jaguar XF supercharged sedan through the washing machine once. It was submerged in water for about 10 minutes until I found it. I was able to fix it by opening the shell and removing all the contents. A ran a blow dryer over all the pieces until they were completely dry (at least they appeared to be) before putting ...


2

The only way to do this is to have the keys programmed to the car. The only way to do that is to take it to the dealership. They have the necessary tools which are proprietary. Only they have them. Yes, it's a racket.


2

If the key doesn't have a battery you can remove, it might be powered by RFID. Try wrapping it in aluminium foil.


2

I can't speak for your region, but where I am there are several locksmith/key shops able to cut and program the blank key for a fraction of the cost.


2

It says in manuals: Press one of the buttons on the card four times close to the vehicle, The next time the vehicle is started, the message will disappear.


2

I found some information for you. It would appear from this internet article that your 2005 Odyssey should be using a sidewinder style key. These are the keys which are cut into the sides and not like what we think of a normal key. They also do not have the fob built into them. Vehicles which use this key are: 2005-2012 Odyssey 2005-2011 Element 2003-2005 ...


2

Typically, Kawasaki's have their key code stamped into the ignition switch. Removal of the ignition switch is required in order to view the key code. I believe with Kawasaki's you be required to have a pin in torx (also referred to as tamperless torx) driver in order to remove the ignition switch. EDIT: Where to look: *On original key--if any. *On ...


2

If you are looking for a method by which you can diagnose the problem to confirm your suspicions that one of your keys has failed I can suggest the following. In close proximity to the ignition barrel, literally around the outer radius, is an RFID reader. When you place the key in the ignition, this energies and attempts to rear the transponder code from ...


1

It is pure and simple a safety thing. The American law given above doesn't spell it out explicitly, but that is the goal of the given regulations - prevent accidental shutoffs while the vehicle is in motion so as to avoid potentially fatal accidents. In Germany, the law is much the same though from what I've heard the phrasing is more explicit - the cars ...


1

Try this, put the key in and leave it in the run position for half an hour. This should learn the key to the anti theft system. You may also want to hook up a battery charger. If that fails a scan tool will be required.


1

I think you tripped out the anti-theft system. If that is the case you would need a factory scan tool or something equivalent to unlock it. I did it on a 06 Malibu and the anti-theft system freaked out. It thinks that someone may possibly be tampering with the electrical or computer system, so it just erases all knowledge of keys and locks down. It's a ...


1

What steps have you tried? Some systems require you to have an original key present in order to program a new one (use the original one to disarm the system, then program the new one), so you might find that without any originals, you have to go back to the dealer to get the new one programmed.


1

The central locking (open) motor on the driver's door may be faulty or a wire is broken connecting to the motor. The ECU is probably trying to unlock the door when you press the button, but failing. Once you have unlocked the drivers door manually, the ECU is then able to unlock the others. Do you have a button inside the car that can lock and unlock the ...


1

The keycode on my Kawasaki Ninja is on the original keychain... its kindof like a mini-dogtag.


1

This sounds very much like a 'dry' solder joint on the battery connector. If you're a dab hand with a soldering iron, go to and re-solder the battery contacts. If not, go see your local watchmaker or IT hobbyist who should be able to solder for you. If it's just a surface carbon buildup, try a cleaner like 'CO Contact Cleaner'


1

I had the same problem - only worked very close to the ignition column. I soldered two thin wires from the battery to the board, and hey presto - fixed! The problem seems to be worn out pads on the board where the battery spring make contact.


1

Omg..a friend thought my car not starting sounded like a security issue with my key fob and recommended that I google my problem. I have a 2006 Volvo S40 and I found others had this same exact problem. I gave the screwdriver method a try and it worked! Crazy but so glad I found this exchange, thank you!



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