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17

I looked into this, and it turns out that almost all aspects of starting or turning off a car are governed by a federal requirements document called FMVSS 114. Things that are in there: Steering wheel lock That little button you have to squeeze on the gear shifter to take it out of park Can't remove key unless you are in park Vehicle can't roll when key is ...


14

As JPhi1618 mentioned, this functionality centers around CFR 571.114, AKA FMVSS 114. Specifically section 5.2.1 which states: Except as specified in S5.2.3, the starting system required by S5.1 must prevent key removal when tested according to the procedures in S6, unless the transmission or gear selection control is locked in “park” or becomes locked in ...


11

Use some Sugru on it It's rubbery in consistency so it won't just snap off when you drop your keys. Use a piece of metal or plastic for the "crossbar" and sugru around it.


10

I recently had a similar problem where I got intermittent "Immobilizer" messages. According to my mechanic (20+ years of Volvo experience) the connector between the antenna ring and the wiring harness sometimes causes problems - taking it off, spraying it with contact cleaner, and re-seating it fixes these. It could be that the vibrations from hitting the ...


9

Here it the procedure for 're-learning' the master key for my Chevy Malibu. I assume that most Chevy's that have a transponder work this way well: With an unlearned master vehicle key, turn ON the ignition, but not the engine: Wait for roughly 10 minutes (mine was slightly longer) for the 'security indicator' to turn off: Turn the ignition completely ...


9

I believe your Elantra has a switch under the hood which detects if it is latched or not. All of the doors, trunk lid/rear hatch, and hood must be closed or the "beep" will not occur. Since you stated the hood was somewhat smashed, it may not be "closing" the switch telling it the hood is down. In other words, your car's security system may be operating ...


8

There may be other reasons but without a doubt a big part of it is because it's impossible to predict under what conditions the car no longer detects the key. And as stated in some of the comments, that could be while driving down the highway, or on the street at just the wrong moment. Hope that helps!


7

I found these instructions on a forum. After several tries, I was able to get both the ignition and keyless entry to work. Make sure you have on your original key and have looked on the back for a black toyota logo. This WILL NOT work for the smart keys with the SILVER toyota logo. (Yes it Does for a 2009 Prius. Also BIG Thing: Have only the old remote ...


7

Seems a horn was damaged. Some cars use the vehicle's horn to "beep" as a response. Others use a separate horn. Pop the hood and look in the front grille area. Use the diagram below to guide you. Do the following: Check the horn connector. Is it fully connected? Is the horn connector broken? Is the horn itself broken? A smashed horn might still work at ...


6

You're going to need a new key, as used, already programmed keys will not work. You'll have to get your dealer to order the key as they're not keys your dealer or mechanic can make. You'll need to know your Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and bring two forms of ID (in my experience) to get a new key; they're very picky about giving out new blank keys, so ...


6

Why not build up the back of the key with araldite [epoxy] and then drill that?


5

I found 2003 and 2005 manuals online. It says that the central locking switch on the dash unlocks all three doors. Once unlocked, you should be able to push the button in the outside door handle, which is the lip above the license/number plate. In the case of an electrical malfunction, you can lift the base of the rear seat, and there is a ring on a cable ...


5

I found the following on the iKeyless website, which indicates that you cannot program the key yourself and would need the dealer or a locksmith to do it. Key Cutting/Programming: Programming instructions are not included. This device requires cutting and programming by a dealership or locksmith. The procedure takes only a few seconds to complete ...


5

I tried again, this time connecting the positive battery lead to the low-amp solenoid input terminal (which was harder to reach -- that's why I didn't try it before) instead of directly to the starter motor, and it started just fine. So presumably the solenoid must be actuating some kind of mechanical linkage between the starter motor and engine rather than ...


5

If you can access the electronics soon after they get wet, the chances are pretty good to keep it working. Unfortunately, after all this time, it's kind of a long shot. There are three major things that happen when you get a circuit board wet: The battery voltage can short across to the wrong parts of the circuit. This will cause it to fail, but seldom ...


5

That is a dealer ID tag. The salesman and managers use it to check keys in and out. They should have taken it off of the key before they handed it to you. If you don't want it, just take it off and throw it away (if the dealership sucked) or take it off and return it if you feel extra nice. EDIT: Here is the webpage for them. Their claim is inventory ...


4

Any key that has already been programmed to a Mercdes will never work in any other car. Once a key has been "flashed" or programmed to one car you can't reprogram the key. Mercedes keys pair "for life", so once you stick a key in the ignition and it works, it's never going to work in another car. It is true that a Mercedes can accept new keys; when you get ...


4

I would venture to guess that it's a overprotective starter lockout circuit. Get something else to plug into the outlet (map light, different changer, inverter, fan...) and see what happens. If it works with a different device plugged in then it's your charger. I don't know why it would behave that way but it's worth a shot.


4

I know my vehicle is equipped with a battery load monitor. When the computer (I assume the body control module) senses a load above some factory set value for more than 10 minutes with the engine off, it disables the power circuit. To reset it requires cycling the ignition switch. Turn the key to start nothing happens, turning the key a second type returns ...


4

This varies a lot by model, era etc., but a general overview: The first thing that happens is the ancilliary electrical systems are powered: Lights Radio (often the radio will be permanently wired, but this varies) Windscreen wipers Dashboard gauges Fans Anything that runs off switched ignition but also the Engine control unit, or ECU, which is what ...


4

A pretty safe fuse protected accessory circuit in your car is the one that powers your audio system. According to this information, you're looking for the following wires: Car Radio Switched 12v+ Wire: Violet Car Radio Ground Wire: Black By tapping into these wires, you can safely add a low power accessory circuit. Alternatively, if you need more ...


3

I worked on VWs and Audis for a while, we had some mkIV's like yours with worn out ignition switches from heavy key rings. My advice is to keep the weight of the key ring to something reasonable.


3

The keys don't necessarily need a rubber head to be 'smart keys', some embed a small resistor inside of them that isn't very noticeable. The fact that the cylinder turns at all means the grooves aren't too worn, etc. It either matches the lock wafers or it doesn't. I would look online for a programming method for new keys. It's likely that the battery went ...


3

I dont think you have much to worry about honestly. I'd be more worried about the plastic link between the metal key and the plastic key fob breaking. (I have a TDi as well - a 2001.) My keys are heavy and have a lot of stuff, and i've never had an issue with it. Is it possible? Sure. Is it likely? No.


3

As suggested by jzd in a comment, try removing the key when in Neutral rather than Park. If trying while in Park, try to ensure you are in Park and the car knows that it's in Park. Does anything else usually happen when Park is engaged? A dashlight or something else to indicate that the car knows it is in Park. Another thing to try is giving the steering ...


3

Its not a short, it's a bad connection. Typically at the battery terminal, but maybe the main body ground off the battery or main connection at the fuse box off power side. Seen it a lot as a tech. Check for looseness or corrosion.


3

On my 2004 Mazda3, turning the key and holding it unlocks all doors.


3

I accidentally ran the smart key for my '09 Jaguar XF supercharged sedan through the washing machine once. It was submerged in water for about 10 minutes until I found it. I was able to fix it by opening the shell and removing all the contents. A ran a blow dryer over all the pieces until they were completely dry (at least they appeared to be) before putting ...


3

I found this information on a Toyota forum. It is from Toyota TSB dated November 9, 2007 (TSB#EL009-07). It works with a lot of different Toyota models for 2007-2008 and may work for yours as well. (NOTE: If it doesn't work, let me know and I'll delete this answer). It appears fairly complicated and time critical (time during/between steps needs to be done ...


3

When you turn the car off and remove the key, make sure the steering is not turned to one side. If you leave the car with the wheels turned you may load up the steering lock as the steering geometry tries to straighten up. You are able to get round this in the circumstances you describe by 'rocking' the steering wheel to relieve the loading on the lock as ...



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