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6

It's a gasoline vent tube, serving three purposes. Gasoline vapors can be especially dangerous under pressure (pretty much why it is useful), and as the temperature fluctuates it is safer to relieve the vapor pressure than it is to potentially have it build up. The gasoline vapors should preferably not be ejected onto a potential spark source (battery) or ...


4

Don't worry, you're not the only one who had to endure this pain... I had an old KZ650 I pulled the carbs from what it looks like a similar design. Like yours, it was older and the plastic air intake tubes were very stiff. Here is what I had to do. Pull gas tank off and disconnect from carbs. Pull the seat off to access the air filter and air box. Pull ...


4

An air screw on a Keihin PWL26 only effects the idle circuit of the carburetor. The idle circuit pulls through the pilot jet exclusively. The pilot jet typically can deliver no more than 15% of the overall fuel when the throttle is wide open. The claim of 15% is based upon the inside diameter of the pilot jet and the inside diameter of the main jet. The ...


3

Its a petrol overflow drain pipe. In case if you fill fuel that overflows it ll be drained through that pipe. it may also have internal connection with a pipe with drains rain water or any water that tries to get into the tank.


3

I have no experience with your model, but sometimes they are located on the petcock, inside the tank. Edit: I cannot find old diagrams, but at least ZZR600's some years younger than yours seem to have had those. Oldest diagram I could find at the moment: http://www.motosport.com/SE/motorcycle/oem-parts/KAWASAKI/2003/ZZR600/FUEL-TANK


3

If the independent service shop is doing good work, the items you've mentioned certainly don't need the attention of a Kawasaki dealer. It's pretty much all standard stuff and you don't need normally need any special Kawasaki tools for either. I'm tempted to say that an independent shop tends to live by its reputation more than a main dealer, so you'll get ...


2

I had a Honda Magna that was knocked over from being parked on two separate occasions. Both times it happened to fall on the clutch side and it curled up the clutch lever. I think this is by design as no other damage was done and I just had to replace the lever. If yours is only bent slightly it might have fallen over at some point but not as hard (I ...


2

In addition to Troggy's sequence, make sure that the clamps on the airbox boots, and the intake boot are fully loose with some slack, and using some heat from a hair-dryer or heat gun will make the rubber boots much more supple.


2

On my old bike I had to pull the fuel tank off to get the carbs out. If anything it will make the job much easier in terms of access for your hands.


2

A Google search revealed several sources for a replacement final drive belt. Getting a replacement should not be a problem. If the current belt is more than five years old or the owner doesn't know how old it is I would replace it soon. The advantages of belt drive are less maintenance, no lubricant is slung off, like on a chain and they are quieter. The ...


2

The back pressure and flow change of the exhaust will have an effect on the combustion and mixture. Usually with a free flowing exhaust, you have to rejet the carb a little richer and with a free flowing airfilter, doubly so. Running it without an airbox is making it worse, the mixture is already lean and stuffing more air down the bores isn't going to help ...


2

Background There are very simple linkage components that afermarket companies manufacturer to lower motorcycles. Here is an example of a component sold to lower the Kawasaki ER6. This is what the shock to swingarm mount looks like with the linkage in place. This is the appearance of the shock to swingarm mount point without the linkage in place. ...


2

It possible to have vehicles that no longer have a VIN despite having one originally since new replacement parts don't have a VIN on them... Motorcycles are worst case since there are so few places the VIN is located to begin with. On a car (with the VIN in a whole bunch of places from the factory), you can easily end up with original VIN parts being ...


1

Possible Answers We were hoping for a little feedback regarding this issue prior to attempting an answer. A few things come to mind regarding the problem description and we'll run through a few of them for you. Regarding Stalling Fuel Line - Your fuel filter may be impeded and require replacement. Since you have not indicated this happens at higher ...


1

In the strict sense, yes it's possible. The probability that your bike has no VIN, though, is orders of magnitude less than miniscule, especially since it's not very old within the history of motor vehicles. If it was built as a prototype and never intended to be placed in production, it may not have a VIN - that's the one possibility for a bike of that ...


1

I had the same problem with my Katana 600. Ran some Seafoam through it and it got better, presumably cleaned up any deposits from gas sitting in the carbs too long.


1

I had the same thing on my 08 ninja 500, the seller obviously laid it down on the left side so it had a "curled" clutch. A new one cost me $7 and I replaced it myself, so not a big deal.



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