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9

An air screw on a Keihin PWL26 only effects the idle circuit of the carburetor. The idle circuit pulls through the pilot jet exclusively. The pilot jet typically can deliver no more than 15% of the overall fuel when the throttle is wide open. The claim of 15% is based upon the inside diameter of the pilot jet and the inside diameter of the main jet. The ...


8

Are you sure the engine isn't liquid cooled as the newer models are? It's very unusual to have an oil temp gauge on a bike, most likely it's a coolant temperature gauge. The fact it's got a coolant fan would suggest it's liquid cooled, too. I'd check the level of the coolant to see if it's a little low, just to be on the safe side. The simple explanation ...


7

Background There are very simple linkage components that aftermarket companies manufacturer to lower motorcycles. Here is an example of a component sold to lower the Kawasaki ER6. This is what the shock to swingarm mount looks like with the linkage in place. This is the appearance of the shock to swingarm mount point without the linkage in place. ...


7

So why are intercoolers used? Running the air through a supercharger is going to make it hot and detonation-prone. The primary benefit of an intercooler is that it reduces the temperature of the boosted intake air. This helps keep detonation in check. The extra density is an added bonus because you can squeeze in more air to make Moar Power. Does this ...


6

Possible Answers We were hoping for a little feedback regarding this issue prior to attempting an answer. A few things come to mind regarding the problem description and we'll run through a few of them for you. Regarding Stalling Fuel Filter - Your fuel filter may be impeded and require replacement. Since you have not indicated this happens at higher ...


6

It's a gasoline vent tube, serving three purposes. Gasoline vapors can be especially dangerous under pressure (pretty much why it is useful), and as the temperature fluctuates it is safer to relieve the vapor pressure than it is to potentially have it build up. The gasoline vapors should preferably not be ejected onto a potential spark source (battery) or ...


5

Don't worry, you're not the only one who had to endure this pain... I had an old KZ650 I pulled the carbs from what it looks like a similar design. Like yours, it was older and the plastic air intake tubes were very stiff. Here is what I had to do. Pull gas tank off and disconnect from carbs. Pull the seat off to access the air filter and air box. Pull ...


5

A free flow exhaust requires more fuel to the engine The baffles created back pressure in your exhaust system that restricted the flow of the exhaust gasses. When you removed the baffles it allowed the engine to 'breath' easier due to the lack of restriction. Restriction in exhaust systems are designed for several things. to restrict gasses flowing into ...


5

There is an O-Ring around the base of the mounting surface that rests against the fuel tank itself. See Image The "O-Ring' that you can see in the picture could be the point of failure. If you want to be sure and rebuilt the petcock entirely and replace the vacuum valve diaphragm as well as the diaphram body O-Ring you can purchase one of these rebuilt ...


5

How do I pull error codes from my Kawasaki motorcycle? Here are the instructions to pull error codes from your 2001 or later Kawasaki street motorcycle. Step 1 Pull off your seat and near the battery negative terminal there will be a self diagnosis lead coming out of a connector. The wire is yellow. It looks like this. Step 2 Get a wire, one with ...


4

The back pressure and flow change of the exhaust will have an effect on the combustion and mixture. Usually with a free flowing exhaust, you have to rejet the carb a little richer and with a free flowing airfilter, doubly so. Running it without an airbox is making it worse, the mixture is already lean and stuffing more air down the bores isn't going to help ...


4

A Bad Diode in Your Rectifier Can Allow AC Current into Your System A bad diode in a rectifier will dump AC current into a system. The AC current heats up the stator and the heat destroys the insulation and ultimately carbonizes it turning it into a low resistance brick. Most stators are three phase AC systems so there will be three diodes in the ...


4

The phenomenon of flames coming out of the exhaust of any vehicle is called a Backfire Basically when you either run rich or lean in the power stroke of the combustion which is not completely burnt , it is sent through the exhaust which obviously being hot reignites with the outside air on contact creating the Backfire effect. This can be of two types: ...


3

Anarach has provided a good survey of the Backfire (or afterfire in this case, if you're being pedantic) phenomenon. I will attempt to add to that keeping it specific to the H2R. Watch this video, the flames are a lot more exaggerated in this case. The H2R, is a track-only hyper-sport bike with every consideration given to make the engine produce most amount ...


3

Its a petrol overflow drain pipe. In case if you fill fuel that overflows it ll be drained through that pipe. it may also have internal connection with a pipe with drains rain water or any water that tries to get into the tank.


3

I have no experience with your model, but sometimes they are located on the petcock, inside the tank. Edit: I cannot find old diagrams, but at least ZZR600's some years younger than yours seem to have had those. Oldest diagram I could find at the moment: http://www.motosport.com/SE/motorcycle/oem-parts/KAWASAKI/2003/ZZR600/FUEL-TANK


3

A Google search revealed several sources for a replacement final drive belt. Getting a replacement should not be a problem. If the current belt is more than five years old or the owner doesn't know how old it is I would replace it soon. The advantages of belt drive are less maintenance, no lubricant is slung off, like on a chain and they are quieter. The ...


3

If the independent service shop is doing good work, the items you've mentioned certainly don't need the attention of a Kawasaki dealer. It's pretty much all standard stuff and you don't need normally need any special Kawasaki tools for either. I'm tempted to say that an independent shop tends to live by its reputation more than a main dealer, so you'll get ...


2

I had a Honda Magna that was knocked over from being parked on two separate occasions. Both times it happened to fall on the clutch side and it curled up the clutch lever. I think this is by design as no other damage was done and I just had to replace the lever. If yours is only bent slightly it might have fallen over at some point but not as hard (I ...


2

In addition to Troggy's sequence, make sure that the clamps on the airbox boots, and the intake boot are fully loose with some slack, and using some heat from a hair-dryer or heat gun will make the rubber boots much more supple.


2

On my old bike I had to pull the fuel tank off to get the carbs out. If anything it will make the job much easier in terms of access for your hands.


2

Need the FI Error Codes First There multiple possible answers as to why your FI light is on but this is a bit of a guessing game unless you pull codes using the following procedure. This is a workaround from using the official Kawasaki dealer tool to get your fuel injection related error codes. Once you have collected the error codes you can now begin to ...


2

This essentially the same answer as your other question related to poor running, thee are instructions on how to pull your Kawasaki error codes. This procedure works for all Kawasaki EFI systems from 2001 to 2015 Need the FI Error Codes First There multiple possible answers as to why your FI light is on but this is a bit of a guessing game unless you pull ...


2

It possible to have vehicles that no longer have a VIN despite having one originally since new replacement parts don't have a VIN on them... Motorcycles are worst case since there are so few places the VIN is located to begin with. On a car (with the VIN in a whole bunch of places from the factory), you can easily end up with original VIN parts being ...


2

In the strict sense, yes it's possible. The probability that your bike has no VIN, though, is orders of magnitude less than miniscule, especially since it's not very old within the history of motor vehicles. If it was built as a prototype and never intended to be placed in production, it may not have a VIN - that's the one possibility for a bike of that ...


2

Try looking it up by the VIN. It should be on your frame somewhere. You can look it up at http://www.carfax.com/vin Also, if it's your motorcycle, you could just split the difference on the fork oil height. The two specs are 7mm apart, so you'd be off by at most 3.5mm. You could also call your local Kawasaki dealer with the VIN.


2

The clutch actuator that pushes the clutch pushrod for the the throwout bearing and the pressure plate from the left side of the engine to the right side of the engine through the primary shaft has a ball and ramp setup. By removing the inner actuator for the ball and ramp that has a worm screw actuator you can add a groove by pushing the actuator into the ...


2

Typically, Kawasaki's have their key code stamped into the ignition switch. Removal of the ignition switch is required in order to view the key code. I believe with Kawasaki's you be required to have a pin in torx (also referred to as tamperless torx) driver in order to remove the ignition switch. EDIT: Where to look: *On original key--if any. *On ...


2

To answer my own question: I contacted another mechanic with this issue who fixed it in no time. I feel quite stupid now... The problem was indeed with the fuel line. The fuel line was clogged with some bits of grass that had fallen in during refilling. But it was clogged in such a "creative" way that the fuel pump was able to pull some fuel through it ...


1

I think it is more likely that a fault in the rectifier would have the caused the overload of the stator. A bad connection is unlikely to have caused the problem, however a short circuit could have caused it, but that would more likely have blown a fuse first. Extra load on the electrical circuit could have damaged the rectifier and then the stator, ...



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