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16

Generally, the outside temperature sensor is located under the front of the hood near the bottom of the car. Although the sensor itself is accurate, the location causes the sensor to pick up heat from the road surface. Thus, it will usually read several degrees higher than the air temperature. This is especially noticeable when driving on high speed ...


9

It varies a lot, but in general it is placed somewhere where it will get as accurate a reading as possible - avoiding engine heat etc. In most of mine it has been low down behind the front bumper, but I did have one car that had the sensor below the driver's door. Misplacement may lead to the effect @Barry pointed out, but in any case, many are ...


6

Meguiars and Turtle Wax have both been making all kinds of plastic cleaners and protectants for a long time, and something like ultimate black is probably one of your best bets. Ideally though, you would have been applying some of this stuff to your bike for the last 13 years to prevent fading in the first place. They say an ounce of prevention is worth a ...


5

I've never done any replacement of black plastic on my motorcycles. I had a BMW mechanic show me a trick on an early 80's BMW he was restoring. He sprayed all the plastic with WD-40. Just saturated it. He then wrapped all of it in plastic or sealed the smaller pieces in sandwich bags. A week later we powerwashed all of it and let it dry. That was three ...


4

I found the problem. I purchased breakdown cover and called the AA out on Sunday afternoon. They were very fast and the guy was incredibly helpful. He said that a fuse had blown, and checked the fuses. He then found a blown fuse and replaced it for another one, but as soon as it touched it instantly blew again. So he looked up on his computer to see which ...


3

A proper thermometer setup is shielded from sunlight, several metres away from any heat source (eg: concrete, car engine, metal/glass that's been sitting in the sun), and a raised a couple of metres off the ground. Nothing in a car will ever be accurate, no matter how hard they try. There are just too many variables, especially when you think about sitting ...


3

It certainly used to be possible to damage the mechanism. . Years ago, on my 1979 Renault 5, I managed to break the self cancellation mechanism just as you describe. A small nub on the steering column snapped off and the indicators never self cancelled again. The nub in question released a spring clip on the indicator stalk to enable it to return to the ...


2

A rundown on the basic self-cancelling mechanism can be found here. Depending on how modern your car is, the mechanisms will have been engineered with materials that are malleable enough to withstand any treatment the mechanism will encounter in normal service. As such, it seems this problem has been all but eliminated in modern commercial vehicles. After ...


2

You shouldn't have any worry about it, necessarily. Keep the documentation as you suggested and pass it along to a new owner if that ever occurs. If you drive it until the tires fall off, this will never be a worry. You aren't trying to get over on someone and you didn't cause the discrepancy yourself. It is what it is and should be treated as such. If you ...


1

I think this diagram will help. This is for a Pantera, but it is a Veglia gauge. Don't pay any attention to the colors they mention, but everything else should be golden for you.


1

http://www.plxdevices.com/product_cat.php?id=MULT These guys offer ODB2 gauges. Since some gauges are not transmitted over ODB2, and sometimes ODB2 is just too slow... they also offer the ability to daisy chain in new gauge sensors to the 1 display module (or multiple). You could also just get a Wifi or Bluetooth ODB2 adapter and run an Android or iPad ...



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