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3

I have observed a glow on new spark plug wires. It is called CORONA. It will go to your fingers without shocking you. I would increase the wire diameter if it was wire change time and your application will accept the larger size wire, otherwise I would consider it normal. On a rainey humid night you should see no visable sparks. Touching wires at this time ...


0

So finally (on the third trip to the garage) they found a fault code. It was the MAP Sensor. Getting it replaced. Fingers crossed that is the end of the problem. Time will tell.


0

Had the same problem, no start but had headlights, wipers, horn, etc. starter and battery were good. long story short, remove the ground strap/wire between the engine and body and scrape the paint off down to bare metal on the body and make SURE all connections are clean. reinstall and problems solved. Gotta have a GOOD ground between vehicle body and ...


7

If you are hearing the starter turn (typical starter whir), the most probable problem would be the one way clutch has gone out. It's the part of the starter with the teeth on it which engages the starter ring gear. If the solenoid has gone out, the starter motor will not spin, because the solenoid is the part which forces a large copper washer into the posts ...


7

If the picture you have attached is similar to the starter on you car, then the power to the starter motor is only delivered if the solenoid operates, so the solenoid must be working. However, the shift lever labelled in the picture, that pushes the pinion forward to engage with the flywheel may be broken, that would explain your problem. Your problem ...


2

The temperature engine rises because the ignition of the fuel is slower. It takes longer for the fuel to burn because there is less of it. The fuel itself has the same amount of BTUs available by burning it whether you use extra oxygen or not. PERIOD. When you blow on the coals in your fire, they get hotter but burn faster. They release the same amount of ...


0

I think the answers are incorrect. Because the question assumption is incorrect. First we have to decide hotter compared to what? and also we need to know this is a fact, is it really hotter or is it a myth? in addition the amount of the fuel/oxygen ratio is important, is this condition always true for all lean ratios? Perhaps the correct question is why the ...


7

You have a qualitative description of what happens, but let's break it down to a smaller scale. When we talk about "temperature" of something, we are really talking about how fast the molecules are moving around and bouncing off each other. "Temperature" is really "kinetic energy". And it turns out that there are other types of energy besides moving around ...


2

I posted this on Reddit, too and someone suggested just pulling the key out with pliers. I did and now the key goes in and out just fine! Who would've thought?


5

If you have ever seen an oxy-acetylene torch being used, you will have noticed that before the oxygen is turned on, the torch has a bright yellow flame. This is the fuel burning in a less than ideal amount of oxygen. The flame is relatively cool and it produces a lot of soot. When the oxygen is turned on, tthe flame turns blue and becomes hot enough to ...


6

Funny you should ask this Max :) First lets make sure of our definition. Running an engine lean means changing the air / fuel ratio to have more air than is ideal (14.7:1 air to fuel). In my reading there are two effects. First, the fuel is an atomized liquid which has a cooling effect on the combustion chamber. So less fuel, less cooling effect. Second, ...


3

Two key observations (no pun intended): jumping the solenoid starts the engine dashboard lights stay on even with the key out This tells me that the ignition circuitry is not following the key position in the ignition barrel. This could be due to a bad ignition switch or break in the associated wiring.


7

It sounds like your shifter may not be seating into park correctly. You may want to try moving it back and forth from gear into park (occasionally, with a slight amount of force; you don't want to break anything). Verify that the key is not in the accessory position, and each time you switch to park, try to remove the key. I've also seen the key release ...


1

I fixed this. Here is what I did: I added a fresh, new battery. It was going to be needed regardless as the battery was producing corrosion, a good sign the battery is at the end of its life. I put a fresh terminal on the damaged terminal where there was corrosion. I stripped the old wires and slapped on a 5 dollar terminal from autozone, plugged the bad ...


1

Omg..a friend thought my car not starting sounded like a security issue with my key fob and recommended that I google my problem. I have a 2006 Volvo S40 and I found others had this same exact problem. I gave the screwdriver method a try and it worked! Crazy but so glad I found this exchange, thank you!


7

Repeated clicking is a result of not enough power making it to the starter. Your battery either has a bad connection, or is too weak to turn the starter motor. Battery Connection Your problem may be entirely due to a bad connection. Starters draw a lot of amps, and batteries are weaker in cold temperatures. I'd start by fully exposing the terminals. You ...


1

Starter/Solenoid: The starter spins your motor up, the solenoid pushes the Starter & Engine gears into contact during starting. Sometimes things get sticky from corrosion or dirt inside the Starter/Solenoid and you'll hear a click or two when you try to crank. Solution: Find your starter and give it a couple of soft to medium TAPS with a hammer (bonus ...


6

This could be caused by multiple things, the most likely case would be a bad battery in need of replacement. However before coming to that conclusion there are a few things which can be checked. Make sure your battery terminals are in good working order and are not grounding out any where make sure they are insulated and not cracked and touching metal. ...



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