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4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


-1

Ck the crank sensor,and the o2 sensor


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After days of research on this exact topic I think I have an answer to fix our problem. To fix your problem I would first change the ignition coil and ignition control module. Both are next to each other and are attached to a small metal bracket bolted to the top of the motor just to the passengers side of the air intake/ throttle body. P.S. From the ECM ...


0

I asked mechanics and they say it's usually the ignition coils for a misfire.


0

I suspect your starter failed to disengage from the flywheel even after the engine started. The screech was probably from the starter as it suddenly began to spin at a rate much greater than it was designed to do. This shouldn't hurt the engine or flywheel, but it will shorten the life of the starter if it continues. If you're lucky, this may not happen ...


1

Your ATV has a twin cylinder engine. I believe the "caps" they are referring to in the diagram are the caps which go onto the coil leads. You need to test the coil resistance through the spark plug leads, with and without the caps. The caps are the part which screws into the spark plug lead and attaches it to the spark plug. Here is a video which explains it ...


1

I think you're spot on with the 'engaging the starter for too long' thought - I suspect it got stuck and didn't return properly. Hopefully it won't have damaged anything, but if it continues you might find it wrecks the starter...


3

I'm betting your Jag is Drive-By-Wire (DBW), meaning, there isn't a direct connection between you and the throttle. If so, the gas pedal rheostat is probably telling the computer you are pressing it, causing the throttle to go up. You could possibly test the gas pedal by unplugging it and checking for even/smooth operation by putting an ohmmeter on the ...


5

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


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The following two items are the exact replacement for various year/make/models of GM vehicles with a 4.3 L engine, including my 1995 Blazer (vin W with PCM)... Spectra Premium model #GM23 "new" distributor Cardone model 84-1635 "new" distributor What is an acceptable amount of up/down play in a distributor shaft? I contact both Spectra Premium and ...


3

(EDIT NOTE: I made a bad assumption about the HEI distributor, so deleted all of that nonsense. Please do the following to see if it is an issue, though.) Please check the following: Take the distributor cap off so you can observe the rotor Put a socket on the crank shaft snout bolt (where the main crank pulley is at) Turn the crank clockwise until you ...


1

Sounds like the ignition or starter switch is the problem. The switch should be leaving some circuits hot in the crank position. It's also possible that the starter is pulling the circuit voltage low enough that it's not sufficient enough to fire the plugs. Check you battery, and connections as well.



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