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5

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


4

That's the wire that goes to the tachometer to show you the RPM of the engine. It's one pulse per spark. You set the number of cylinders on tach and it's then divides by that number to display the RPM of the engine.


4

A Good Ground All the coils on that bike want are a good ground. If you can find a good spot on the frame to mount them that isn't in the way you are good. Feel free to weld a couple of tabs onto a random convenient spot anywhere on the good iron from that you can. Best of luck.


4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


3

I'm betting your Jag is Drive-By-Wire (DBW), meaning, there isn't a direct connection between you and the throttle. If so, the gas pedal rheostat is probably telling the computer you are pressing it, causing the throttle to go up. You could possibly test the gas pedal by unplugging it and checking for even/smooth operation by putting an ohmmeter on the ...


3

(EDIT NOTE: I made a bad assumption about the HEI distributor, so deleted all of that nonsense. Please do the following to see if it is an issue, though.) Please check the following: Take the distributor cap off so you can observe the rotor Put a socket on the crank shaft snout bolt (where the main crank pulley is at) Turn the crank clockwise until you ...


3

The answer was that the battery was bad. Apparently it was a cheap battery and the failed alternator drained it. Once it had been drained, it would no longer hold a charge. Replacing the batter with a new, good-quality (VW) battery fixed the problem entirely. One clue was that when I jumpstarted the car, all the symptoms went away -- no blinking lights ...


3

Background So there is a grounding switch on your clutch lever, hence the need to pull in the clutch to start the motorcycle. Troubleshooting You can disconnect that switch and get a piece of wire and complete the circuit at the connector. Once that's done, make sure you're in neutral and then try to start the bike. The switch is labeled 10 in the ...


3

First you need to dislodge it. I would use something like this tool: Then, before you go to remove the spark plug, take a shop vac and vacuum the piece out of there. If you hold the shop vac's hose half-way over the hole, the air turbulence should remove the small piece of debris. Also, if the piece is ferrous in nature, the hook I showed above should ...


2

If your motorcycle uses an electric starter (as opposed to a kick starter), the starter will draw far & away more current than the ignition system - like perhaps fifty times as much. A bike with only a kick starter only needs a tiny battery, while one with only an electric starter requires a big one. When battery capacity is too low, generally both the ...


2

My only suggestions would be: Use compressed air, as Zaid suggested Use a narrow screwdriver Make sure you don't lose it - worthwhile getting a closer look at it to see if you can identify where it came from!


2

When you turn the car off and remove the key, make sure the steering is not turned to one side. If you leave the car with the wheels turned you may load up the steering lock as the steering geometry tries to straighten up. You are able to get round this in the circumstances you describe by 'rocking' the steering wheel to relieve the loading on the lock as ...


2

If I understand you problem correctly you can't get the distributor to drop all the way down and line up. Older V-8 Chevys drove (spun) the oil pump with the distributor. The way it works is the crankshaft is connected to the camshaft by the timing chain. At the end of the cam shaft a gear meshes with the distributor drive gear. The bottom of the distributor ...


1

As I noted in the comments, I don't think the ECU is programmable, hence why you can't find anything on the topic online. It can still be "chipped", i.e. removing one or more EPROM's and soldering in a flashed substitute. Alternatives you could try are either a) swapping out the entire ECU with an aftermarket unit, e.g. Diktator, Spitronics, etc or b) ...


1

Your ATV has a twin cylinder engine. I believe the "caps" they are referring to in the diagram are the caps which go onto the coil leads. You need to test the coil resistance through the spark plug leads, with and without the caps. The caps are the part which screws into the spark plug lead and attaches it to the spark plug. Here is a video which explains it ...


1

I think you're spot on with the 'engaging the starter for too long' thought - I suspect it got stuck and didn't return properly. Hopefully it won't have damaged anything, but if it continues you might find it wrecks the starter...


1

Sounds like the ignition or starter switch is the problem. The switch should be leaving some circuits hot in the crank position. It's also possible that the starter is pulling the circuit voltage low enough that it's not sufficient enough to fire the plugs. Check you battery, and connections as well.


1

I had a similar issue on a car years ago, has the feed to the ignition been put on the wrong terminal? i.e. one that is not "live" when the starter operates? if so, then it causes exactly what you describe. One way to test is to supply the ignition circuit directly from the battery and operate the starter, results will be evident.


1

I have experienced this and the first thing to check is the battery terminals for tightness. Open your hood, locate the battery and try to move the battery terminals. They should be tight and not move. Any movement is a sign of looseness which permits corrosion between the contacting surfaces. Get a wrench and tighten them. The connector loosens up to the ...


1

Sounds like the wire is mounted incorrectly at the points. There is an insulator where the wire in connected. Make sure the wire is connected to the points spring arm, and not to the base or mounting hole. If it is connected there it will be grounded all the time and will never produce spark at the coil. To check this, disconnect the wire and turn on the ...


1

I am assuming you removed the original condenser if it didn't have a uniset in it when you changed them. That being said, it sounds like the points are either not fully seated or adjusted way off. Loosen the screws and try pushing down while trying to slide the point set. There is a hole that the point pivot must fit into or it will not seat properly ...


1

I'm not sure what your headlights have to do with an audio system? If you are fitting the audio system yourself, you need to find a switched source of power, one which comes on when you turn the key. The best way to fit this is to buy the adapter kit for it, which will give you a wired adapter which plugs into your car and aligns with the color coding on ...


1

Your mechanic seems to have repaired the fault by replacing the alternator. A faulty alternator will drain the battery as you describe and can be quite dramatic in causing other symptoms.


1

It will wear the engine internals more, as there is less lubrication. It's roughly equivalent to pulling the coil wire on a distributor and just spinning the engine for no reason. At that low of engine rotation speed, the oil pump is not providing sufficient oil. There's also possibility to cause extra wear to the transmission, as you're shifting into gear ...


1

I don't think it's good for the car, but I don't think you are doing any irreparable harm. I don't think mechanically it is causing you anything major, but you are probably causing spark plugs to foul sooner, carb (I'm assuming this is an older vehicle since you didn't specify) is probably getting gummed up, and probably more along this line. This would be ...


1

An old PARKER'S guide to the Uno known starting faults says: Failed distributor vacuum unit. Two small wires inside distributor break after 8-9 years or 60K-70K miles. Crankshaft position sensor.


1

As suggested in the comments, I don't thing the problem resides in the distributor, but in the Idle Air Control (IAC) valve. It either needs to be replaced or it needs to be cleaned and adjusted. Be careful when removing/cleaning/adjusting, as the gears inside are very fragile. It doesn't take much to push the plunger in and cause an issue. I believe the ...


1

I just experienced the same deal. However, the fix didn't entail any sort of weird mechanical voodoo. I just changed the battery on the key fob. The symptoms were the following: (1) was able to control door locks remotely, (2) the key hole would emit weird clicking sounds, (3) the status on the console read "Key Error". I called my trusted Volvo mechanic ...



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