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13

Ants are unlikely to be the source of your issue. Your battery is filled with sulfuric acid, and that is sufficiently strong enough to completely dissolve any ants that made their way into your battery. Above that, your battery should be completely sealed. Also, even if the ants did manage to get into your engine: metal > ant. This issue is more than likely ...


8

From personal experience, I'd replaced ALOT of these working at the dealership. It wasn't just the accords either, it was quite a few Honda and Acuras that used the same design and power delivery system. The most common issues I saw out of probably close to 100+ failures of these was: Ground strap on the starter becoming corroded. Bad ground to engine ...


8

First, think of the possible failure modes: Spark plug is clogged with carbon or has an isolation error - it conducts current, but doesn't generate sparks, because the current flows through the carbon from electrode to electrode. Break inside the plug, e.g. broken / worn electrodes - plug doesn't conduct (and of course doesn't generate sparks) Cable has a ...


7

I'm sorry if this ends up being a lengthy answer. The answer to this question is more historical than anything else but first a little background. In a waste spark system an ignition coil has two spark plug outputs unlike every other system only having one. Each ignition coil is hooked up to two spark plugs. These spark plugs reside in two opposing ...


7

This is usually the symptom of a dead battery. Has the car been sitting for a long time without being driven? Or did you leave the headlights or interior lights on? Try jump starting it (see owner's manual for instructions) and drive it for a while to charge the battery. (I usually find that 30 minutes or so of driving is sufficient; make sure not to switch ...


7

Repeated clicking is a result of not enough power making it to the starter. Your battery either has a bad connection, or is too weak to turn the starter motor. Battery Connection Your problem may be entirely due to a bad connection. Starters draw a lot of amps, and batteries are weaker in cold temperatures. I'd start by fully exposing the terminals. You ...


7

It sounds like your shifter may not be seating into park correctly. You may want to try moving it back and forth from gear into park (occasionally, with a slight amount of force; you don't want to break anything). Verify that the key is not in the accessory position, and each time you switch to park, try to remove the key. I've also seen the key release ...


7

You have a qualitative description of what happens, but let's break it down to a smaller scale. When we talk about "temperature" of something, we are really talking about how fast the molecules are moving around and bouncing off each other. "Temperature" is really "kinetic energy". And it turns out that there are other types of energy besides moving around ...


7

If the picture you have attached is similar to the starter on you car, then the power to the starter motor is only delivered if the solenoid operates, so the solenoid must be working. However, the shift lever labelled in the picture, that pushes the pinion forward to engage with the flywheel may be broken, that would explain your problem. Your problem ...


7

If you are hearing the starter turn (typical starter whir), the most probable problem would be the one way clutch has gone out. It's the part of the starter with the teeth on it which engages the starter ring gear. If the solenoid has gone out, the starter motor will not spin, because the solenoid is the part which forces a large copper washer into the posts ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


6

This could be caused by multiple things, the most likely case would be a bad battery in need of replacement. However before coming to that conclusion there are a few things which can be checked. Make sure your battery terminals are in good working order and are not grounding out any where make sure they are insulated and not cracked and touching metal. ...


6

Funny you should ask this Max :) First lets make sure of our definition. Running an engine lean means changing the air / fuel ratio to have more air than is ideal (14.7:1 air to fuel). In my reading there are two effects. First, the fuel is an atomized liquid which has a cooling effect on the combustion chamber. So less fuel, less cooling effect. Second, ...


5

A Good Ground All the coils on that bike want are a good ground. If you can find a good spot on the frame to mount them that isn't in the way you are good. Feel free to weld a couple of tabs onto a random convenient spot anywhere on the good iron from that you can. Best of luck.


5

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


5

In the dawn of fuel injection most cars used a simultaneous double fire system. During every crank shaft revolution the injectors spray half the fuel needed. This way half the fuel waits on top of the intake valve. When the intake valve opens the first half is dumped in and the injector sprays in the other half the fuel. Similar thing happens with the ...


5

Pin 16 on the ODB-II connector is specified as "Battery Power" or "Battery Positive". There will always be 12v power between pin 4 and 16. Note that pin 5 has "ground" in the description, but that is just for the communication signalling and not for power. The connector will always have power on these two pins regardless of the key position, and when ...


5

In the circuit that contains your starter relay there is a fuse, typically it is a 30amp fuse. Here is an image a Yamaha R1 starter relay fuse Depending on your model of motorcycle you will need to: Discover the location of your relay fuse Remove a plastic cover for the relay Possibly, remove a plastic cover for the fuse. Remove and Replace old fuse ...


5

If you have ever seen an oxy-acetylene torch being used, you will have noticed that before the oxygen is turned on, the torch has a bright yellow flame. This is the fuel burning in a less than ideal amount of oxygen. The flame is relatively cool and it produces a lot of soot. When the oxygen is turned on, tthe flame turns blue and becomes hot enough to ...


4

Background So there is a grounding switch on your clutch lever, hence the need to pull in the clutch to start the motorcycle. Troubleshooting You can disconnect that switch and get a piece of wire and complete the circuit at the connector. Once that's done, make sure you're in neutral and then try to start the bike. The switch is labeled 10 in the ...


4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


4

The absence of a clicking sound indicates that the starter relay isn't energizing the starter circuit. Here are two possible culprits: Starter relay. It could well be that the solenoid inside relay is sticking, preventing the switch on the starter side from closing and turning the engine over. This would explain why you do not hear the starter relay ...


4

There are some advantages to having a smaller, thinner electrode, in that it reduces something called the quenching effect. This is when the heat from the spark is partly absorbed by the electrodes, reducing the effectiveness of the spark. However for the same reason, thinner electrodes also can't conduct away heat as well, so they tend to erode faster. ...


4

I would personally avoid it as you'll be putting some very odd stresses on the engine and the heat generated will be non-uniform too. For the sake of arranging recovery or even finding a friend with a straight bar or even just a sturdy piece of rope, I don't think it's worth potentially ruining your engine.


4

Iridium spark plugs are not going to give you more performance compared to copper types. You will notice increased performance only if the current plugs are in bad shape to begin with. The advantage of iridium spark plug is that they last a lot longer compared to the copper ones. So you don't have to change plugs that often. So it is up to you to decide if ...


4

Background You have two coils on that motorcycle. One coil is for cylinder 2 and 3 the other is for cylinder 1 and 4. It utilizes what is known as a wasted spark system, the spark is fired off on TDC compression and TDC exhaust strokes. You apparently have an issue with one of your two systems. Each system, as you probably know, is comprised of two ...


4

While the vehicles are equipped with a distributor the innards of that distributor have changed quite a bit. The distributor no longer contains flyweights or any mechanical timing controls, instead it contains the camshaft position sensor. The way the system works is, readings are taken from the crankshaft position sensor by the PCM. The PCM then ...


4

A pretty safe fuse protected accessory circuit in your car is the one that powers your audio system. According to this information, you're looking for the following wires: Car Radio Switched 12v+ Wire: Violet Car Radio Ground Wire: Black By tapping into these wires, you can safely add a low power accessory circuit. Alternatively, if you need more ...


3

The stalling symptoms could be explained by a fuel pump relay that doesn't like heat. I say this because the vehicle stalled seemingly intermittently, but whenever the car had been running for quite some time, only for it to start up again after a few minutes (allowing the relay to cool down a bit). If the relay is the root cause, the fix would be to ...


3

I'm betting your Jag is Drive-By-Wire (DBW), meaning, there isn't a direct connection between you and the throttle. If so, the gas pedal rheostat is probably telling the computer you are pressing it, causing the throttle to go up. You could possibly test the gas pedal by unplugging it and checking for even/smooth operation by putting an ohmmeter on the ...



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