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7

Most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engines power is not being transmitted to the transmission. Cost of a clutch replacement is to varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much more ...


5

Nothing. It could work exactly the same as a keyed ignition, in which case your starter motor would engage, but manufacturers (and I think this is true for all) have added a simple piece of logic which only engages the starter if the engine is not already running. This would be the ideal solution for keyed ignition as well, but it has only been in ...


4

There are 3 areas to focus on: Battery: Make sure your battery can still hold a charge well as cold is going to show problems first. Double check that your battery cables are tight and not overly corroded. Starter: As Bob asked, if the starter is the original it could be going bad and struggling under only tough conditions Electrical/Ignition Switch: ...


3

This sounds like there is an issue with the ground at the battery. Sometimes it appears there is a good connection there (especially when using side post terminals), yet there is only enough of a connection to allow the low amperage stuff to work. Then, when you turn the key, the starter starts to engage, but then continuity is lost because there is not ...


3

This varies a lot by model, era etc., but a general overview: The first thing that happens is the ancilliary electrical systems are powered: Lights Radio (often the radio will be permanently wired, but this varies) Windscreen wipers Dashboard gauges Fans Anything that runs off switched ignition but also the Engine control unit, or ECU, which is what ...


3

A car needs 3 things to start: Fuel, Air, & Spark. You can do try the following to either rule in or rule out the missing piece: To make sure you're getting air and spark, try taking off the mass air flow cover from your manifold, and spark a little starter fluid directly into the intake, while attempting to start the car. If the car is getting a spark, ...


3

You can find the spark plug gap specifications on a sticker that will be either on the radiator support or on the underside of the hood (there are other locations such as the strut towers, etc). This is the gap that should be used when using the OEM spark plugs and even when using an off-branded plug that is a valid replacement for the OEM brand. Here are a ...


3

If the other ignition coil went bad it could cause a misfire which could make it hard to start. It gets fairly cold where I live. One of the first things to check would be your battery. If it doesn't have enough cold cranking amps, either because it is old or because it never had enough, then it can be really hard to start a car in the cold. Also check ...


2

It may seem unlikely but I've had similar issues on other vehicles caused by corrosion on the battery terminal posts or loose connections. The accessories can still work because they require less amperage and the ignition or starter can't get high enough amperage over a barely connected battery. It could also be a loose connection to the ignition coil ...


2

Perplexing situation solved. As shown in the photograph with the red circle, the “tamper-proof” lock protector has “tamper-proof” screws - screws without heads or other visible means of support or removal. I drilled out the visible screw and cut away (with a cut-off saw) the housing hosting the screw closest to the instrument panel. Once these two ...


2

The purpose of turning the wheel one turn is to put the wheels at a cant (other than straight). This is especially important on standard shift vehicles so it cannot just be put into neutral and moved. It just gives one more weapon in the arsenal against car thieves. The action of applying the club should be, before you turn the ignition off, turn the ...


1

The click sound means there isn't enough current (amps) supplied to the starter to physically turn the motor. Try hitting the starter (give it a decent smack with a wrench or hammer) while a friend turns the key. Check battery voltage (12.6 volts) AND cranking amps. check for a voltage drop and a parasitic draw. It could be a ground issue but I'd start with ...


1

It sounds like you've got a pretty good idea what you're doing already! I'd start by replacing the points & condensor and regapping them, that way you can eliminate one potential problem immediately. The same with the fuel filter - all are quick and cheap and will need doing anyway... Do a compression check as well, to make sure that is good, and ...


1

The idea of turning the wheel is to have the wheels turned to prevent movement of the car. After you park, turn the wheel prior to shutting off the car. I would suggest turning them towards the curb. If the ignition is removed by the thief the wheel will be unlocked. If the wheels were straight he would be able to drive the car albeit only in a straight ...


1

Bad crank sensor Well, it turns out that the 2nd bullet on my list of things not wrong was incorrect. I had "assumed" that the crank sensor was fine because I had just put a new one in not 3 months ago with a brand new harmonic balancer. Plus it looked perfect as far as a visual inspection. No odd wear or corrosion just a little soot built up on the ...


1

The answer to this problem is in your question,"I jumped the wire...". This points out a faulty cable. Broken inside of its insulation, or gone dry on one or other of its terminals. If your car turns off OK with the jump wire in place, then simply do the jump wire as a neat re-wiring job and leave that in place instead of the suspect wire. Use the same size ...


1

Early keyless ignitions vary by manufacturer, but most don't just let you turn the car off. Typically it's a 3-5 second hold. All the OEM keyless ignition buttons are software controlled, they aren't directly connected to the starter. Due to recent "unintended acceleration" events and hoo-haa, a standard "3 second hold" has become the norm. I think even a ...


1

If you just push it, nothing. It would be rather hazardous if you could find yourself without engine power just by bumping a button. If you hold it down for some time (e.g. 3 seconds on a Lexus (pg 117)), it'll shut off the engine, same as turning the key to off on a conventional ignition.


1

Since the only thing that changed between the time it worked and the time it didn't work was the passenger door, I'd be willing to bet that's your problem. Since there is no way to diagnose the specific electrical malfunction with this site, I suggest removing all the connections from the passenger door, and verifying that everything works as it should (car ...


1

Your ignition switch theory may have merit. Another option is that the battery, while still operating at around 12v, is worn and is producing less current (Amps) than it did originally. If the car has more trouble starting when it's cold outside then this is a more likely culprit. I would have said it sounds like your starter solenoid might be failing but ...


1

Something which might help you diagnose the issue better is to do an old school trick on your just replaced distributor cap. This would be to generously spray the inside of the cap and the rotor with WD-40. Many people use this as a lubricant to help with stuck nuts and such. The WD in the name actually means Water Displacement. By spraying this inside, it ...


1

You may need to have the key reprogrammed. I believe that if the vehicle does not recognize a key that has been inserted into the ignition, because of the immobilizer, it will not allow the key to activate the ignition even if the key has been turned. The immobilization method varies between makes and models but this is the general principle. On older ...


1

Had a similar problem with my 2006 1.8 petrol s40. Immobilizer stuck on, "immobilizer, see manual" error message. I checked all fuses, wiring etc, lock unlock 5 times myth and disconnected my battery for half an hour! I was on the verge of calling an auto electrician out when I stumbled upon a post that advised me to turn the key all the way to the firing ...



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