Hot answers tagged

10

They Exist I was unable to find any manufacturers that have rolled out this technology into production vehicles but there are several manufacturers that have the baseline technology in R&D Formula 1 Formula 1 has always been a playground for engineers and with the new rules implemented in 2012 the current platforms are running this technology and ...


9

As race fever indicated, many modern cars, and all hybrids, will record how many hours the ICE (internal combustion engine) has been running. It appears the Ford C-max, along with most other hybrids, pass this clock into an 'oil life indicator' (should have called it Oil Indicator of Life, or OIL for short!), which calculates and displays an alert for when ...


9

It depends on the type of hybrid car you are talking about. In one type of hybrid, there will be a gasoline engine and at least one electric engine capable of driving the wheels. In this case, the gasoline engine must still use a transmission because it cannot be revved too high without causing major damage or shortened life. One possible solution to this ...


7

Brake performance, or vehicle stability, not motive power are the primary concerns with trailer limits. Why no trailers in early hybrids? Several considerations; first is the battery. In hybrids with regenerative braking the electric motors act as generators producing electricity. Now that electricity has be put somewhere; it goes into the battery. But ...


5

There are two power systems on all electric cars (fully electric and hybrids alike). This is in conjunction with the much higher voltage battery packs which normally power the electric motors. The reason for this extra power system is to power things like lights, electronics, and HVAC systems (to name a few). Most hybrid vehicles (and never a fully electric ...


4

I don't entirely agree with the upvoted answer. I have read somewhere (but cannot locate the source right now) that the electrical power transfer pathway is 70% efficient in Toyota Prius, whereas the mechanical power transfer pathway is probably over 90% efficient. Consider this: the electrical components (inverters) have water cooling, but the mechanical ...


4

The short answer is power requirements. Most of the vehicles are parallel, or mild hybrids, some are series/parallel (Prius and Tahoe come to mind), and there are a few series ones (Chev Volt). A series hybrid has to have enough electrical power to get the vehicle to top speed. This means bigger motors, even bigger batteries, and a decent size genset or ...


3

I did some research regarding your symptoms. Mind you I was a Honda MC mechanic and have NEVER worked on a hybrid. But since this space is blank I'll fill it with what I discovered. All of the posts I could find point to your main battery having an issue. Is that the battery you had checked at the auto parts store? I would look at the connections to the ...


2

It all depends on whether your year of car supported the option or not. If it never had the option then you might as well buy the newer model. This is because retrofitting an option such as this would be extremely expensive, requiring wiring and computers and all kinds of things. If your year car had the option and just your trim line didn't offer it then ...


2

I don't think the accepted answer answers this question acceptably. The reason for hybrid vehicles having a mechanical power transfer pathway is that mechanical power transfer has a higher efficiency than electric power transfer. I have read somewhere (but cannot find the source right now) that the electrical power transfer pathway is approximately 70% ...


2

Our experience with the Prius is that is holds up very well over time. The Prius Hybrid Battery failure rate below 200k miles is low. Inverter failure is not common. Some of the motors in the transmissions will fail but not at low mileages. The Honda Civic hybrid has a had battery problems at lower mileages. The risk with a hybrid is that hybrid designs ...


1

Lots of good answers, but will clarify something for what it is worth: All hybrid cars do have a 12V and a high voltage system. In my Prius (2009, 2003-2009 model), the 12v battery is in the boot. The standard car electrics like computers (all 13 of them) and screens and headlight and indicators and everything runs off the 12v battery. The 12v battery is ...


1

The other answers failed to emphasize an important point: the 12V battery on hybrid cars is not designed to start an engine, being much smaller than typical automotive starter batteries. Thus, it may not have the cranking amps capacity to successfully start the other car. The 12V battery is merely there to provide power for lights and to boot up the computer ...


1

That's exactly what I'd say the issue is ... most vehicles today have blend door actuators which are operated with an electric motor. These motors can go bad without regard to your comfort. In most cases the actuators are pretty easy to get to, though I don't know exactly where it's at with your specific vehicle. You will most likely find it on the driver's ...


1

Yes, you can jump the 12v battery from another 12v source. Ensure you are using the jumper cables correctly (+ to + and - to -) and you shouldn't have any issues. Your suggestion of the vehicle being jerky/sluggish would have nothing to do with the 12v battery system. This would have to do with the gas engine itself, or with the high voltage battery ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible