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2

Try using some graphite lube on the lock cylinder before you give up on it. If you remove the lock cylinder, disassemble it, and clean it, you may improve it's function. You should also be able to get the lock cylinder re-keyed at the dealer or a locksmith prior to installation.


0

If you cannot feel the vibration in the steering wheel it is unlikely that the problem will be related to wheel balance or alignment. The symptoms described sound awfully similar to what I recently experienced with my Touareg after it came back from a two-week dealership visit; I could feel severe vibrations over a range of speeds (and in reverse) on ...


1

I think the problem may be the torque converter in the transmission. According to this article on Class Actions News, there was a lady who had a similar issue on their 2005 Odyssey which they brought class action lawsuit against Honda for this problem. There was a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) which was issued for 2007, 2008, and some 2009 Odysseys (but ...


0

Can you manually unlock the door by pulling the pole up or moving the lock switch over? I know this is not an answer but without being there I need more information.


2

I have a 2013 Honda Civic EX Sedan. The ECON mode, from my research and personal experience with my car, does the following: changes the shift pattern of the transmission to maximize mpg by limiting downshifts unless you "floor it", reduces the A/C compressor operation and A/C fan to conserve mpg, changes the throttle response to maximize mpg and adjusts ...


0

Stupid question: Did someone turn on the child safety latch and you've only tried to open the door from the inside? Outside chance, but I thought I'd mention it. Obviously, if the door is unlocked you can still unlatch it from the outside. It could be either one of two things: the rod which goes from the lock solenoid to the locking mechanism is broke (or ...


1

2001 are new enough they are switched to the new Ozone safe refrigerant that you can buy over the counter. I personally buy a bottle of AC PRO with stop leak. They seem to have the best chemical mix/ stop leak. Then when I know its holding a charge, I buy the cheaper Frost refrigerant. You are getting what you pay for refrigerant wise... It also can take ...


0

If you are having an issue with anything a body shop has done, take it back to them. Almost every major body shop (ones that do warranty repair) in the US gives a lifetime warranty on their work (they'll continue doing this if they want to keep getting the warranty work). I don't know if you live in the States, but if you do, they need to take care of it. ...


1

yes, A shop will just be filling your system with refrigerant and dye, then run your a/c for a few hours and look for the source of the issue. Typically, before you can fix anything AC related you need the system to be vacuumed, so your not expelling refrigerant into the air. Even if it is leaking out, there is usually still a bit left in the system.


1

Apparently there are two different grills (at least) for different models of your vehicle. 71121-TR3-A01 fits the following vehicles: 71121-TR3-A11 fits the following vehicles: So it's basically the difference between the GX and EX models in this instance.


1

If the photograph attached is an actual photograph of your car then the OBD port appears to be in two pieces. The blue connector on the right of the photograph should be clipped into the main piece along with the other one already in place on the left. With only half a loom connected, you are unlikely to see any OBD codes although I believe surprisingly ...


0

Buy your own reader. Look at the ELM327 bluetooth reader. It's about $20. If your check engine light is on the car had a code. To be honest, this sounds like a case of a human error. Luckily, Eric the Car Guy has a video about pulling Honda codes without a scanner. Watch the video and make sure you are doing it correctly: ...


-1

CEL means engine is not burning properly and it could mean a dozen things. Even without OBD code, you could still solve the mystery by observing the symptoms. Normally symptom is more pronouced at idle. It looks like you might have to do without the help of OBD II. Gather more symptoms.


1

Use Honda's website, dude. Call the dealer and ask if you can buy the parts book. http://estore.honda.com/honda/parts/view-honda-parts-catalog-detail.asp?m=2014-civic-4-ex-cvt&sn=&b=B++45&dl=


1

I'm pretty sure there was a recall for the ignition switch on your car. My 2002 Civic had this same problem, and that was the component causing the issue. TLDR: Inspect/replace the ignition switch.


1

I don't know if this is what you are looking for, but I often reverse engineer through looking at online sources like rockauto.com. I will find the part I need on there. Many of them will have the associated original part number if not the original parts listed themselves.


0

First you need to use factory control arm or your suspension problems will be on going due to parts being stressed at wrong angles. There are bushing press kits that presses in the bushings, so the hard work is really how to dissassemble the suspension. Mind you the spring can kill you if you loosen the lower suspension without first clamping the spring. And ...


0

It was the brake calipers getting stuck shut, the pads were so thin also they may have been binding from heat. I heard a ticking noise later which turned out to be the CV axle a result of it, but really just the spindle on the end of it. I replaced my rotors, calipers, pads, bearings and front axles regardless. The binding was a rusty caliper and the ticking ...


1

Every infernal combustion engine runs best within a stated temperature range. There is a temperature below which the engine is cold, with the heater not working and the need to subject it only to gentle acceleration. There is a temperature at or above which the engine is overheating so badly that it must be shut down and the problem traced and corrected. In ...


2

I would bet the problem you are having is not with the bushings, but with the geometry of the aftermarket control arm and lowering. When you make changes (like lowering) you have to consider the trade-offs. Bump-steer is one of them. If it is not done absolutely correct, you'll experience these types of issues. Today after all of the ice has melted, my ...


1

I suspect issues in two components of your car but since you have already mentioned that Honda people have had a look not 100% sure. Clogged up Intake: I know it sounds very trivial but a clogged up intake is sometimes overlooked. Faulty EGR system: Almost al of the symptoms you suggest are very much mimicking the symptoms for a faulty EGR valve here are ...


2

Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


3

Relay is here: That's in the driver's footwell. I believe it's above the fuse box, around the hood open latch. There's a plastic cover over the relays you'll have to pull off. There's one for the relays and one for the fuse box. It should just pull out and the new one can be popped right in. You'll have to pull hard.


2

I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


1

I hate to tell you this, but any 12/3 extension cord (15A or better) will do what you need. I see nothing there which you need anything special to get your block heater attached to AC power. I grew up in a cold environment (Northern Rockies in Montana). All our cars had block heaters. We never had anything special beyond the male plug you've shown in the ...


1

This answer is a bit hypothetical; please take it as one path to follow, that may be useful in this and other, similar, cases. Perhaps the clue to the problem is not in the spark plug (or injector?) replacement, but rather in this part: "I had a engine tune up". While we do not know if the OP had this performed at an official garage, if this was the case ...


4

The extra fuel will be being distributed into the breather system of the fuel tank. Most fuel tank have the main fill tube which the fuel goes into plus at least one additional smaller tube to prevent air becoming trapped in the tank. It is likely that you are filling the fill tube with fuel which is then being forced into the tank and up into the breather ...


3

I don't think you replaced the injectors. I think you replaced the spark plugs. Injectors are what spray gas into the combustion chamber, and those are usually replaced or cleaned on older cars. You said it happened right after the spark plugs were replaced. Why not replace them again? They might be the wrong spark plugs, they might have the wrong spark ...


5

The extra gas you are pumping in your tank is likely going back into the pump at the station, which is also drying out your bank account! Most gas stations are equipped with vapor recovery systems that feed the gas back into their tanks to prevent vapors from escaping into the air, which would otherwise contribute to air pollution. Also, according to the ...


2

See if the below image below helps: That would indicate your transmission is in direct drive. Usually this happens if you have inadvertently switched off the overdrive or have put the gear selector in the wrong position. You can find the owners manual at the Honda Site.


0

If this is a standard transmission, check the clutch pedal ignition switch. The switch may be bad or the rubber plug on the clutch lever may have deteriorated and the lever does not depress the switch. This happened on my 93 Civic and cost me $0.50 to get the new plug for the clutch lever. Another thing to check is the EFI relay Oten times the solder points ...


0

If the battery is good, and the lights do not work, it may be the "fuseable link". A short lead close to the positive terminal. If this is blown it requires looking into. If it is loose or not plugged in you should be OK. The Starter relay does not depend on this, but the car will not run without it. I would expect it to crank though, so maybe you have a ...


4

The clicking sound on cranking is usually a strong indication of a weak battery that needs replacement. This is also corroborated by the fact that the lights don't work. If the vehicle can be jump-started it will confirm that the battery isn't charged. Have the battery tested if this is the case and replaced if need be.


3

Just had the same issue on my 2004 Honda . Before replacing the starter, take a look at the ground strap on the starter itself. Mine was corroded . Cleaned it with sandpaper and put some rust / corrosion inhibitor on it and it has been working fine. Hope this saves someone from buying a new starter unnecessarily.


0

I have an 1985.5 Volkswagen (VW) Vanagon which has a 1.9L H4 with engine seals that are known to fair early and often with phosphate-containing coolants. The partially-redesigned 1986 2.1L engine speicifies use of phosphate-free as well to address this issue, but there was no apparent redress of this 1980-1985.5 models. I'm taking my recent cooling system ...


1

Here is a picture of what I believe your engine should look like: The red arrow should be what you are seeing. This is the serpentine belt which drives the accessories. The green arrow is the cover which inside is where the timing belt lies. There is no real way to tell if the timing belt has been changed. After a couple hundred miles of running on the ...


2

I got my sister's '88 Civic with 120,000 miles in '97. It currently has 383,000 miles on it. Always starts and averages 45-47 mpg on highway (one hour 50 mile trips to work). I maintain it well. Have never flushed cooling system. Use Wal-mart green antifreeze. Change every three years. Including original water pump, car has had three. None have ever ...


0

The Eco assist is not a placebo and it says nothing vague. It teaches you. "is a fuel efficiency INFORMATION system designed to HELP (teach) you DEVELOP (learn) and MAINTAIN ( continue to use what you learned ) a fuel-efficient driving style. The system MONITORS (gathers data) driving style, and can DISPLAY (shows you the data on the dashboard) the ...


1

I believe it is possible to adjust the length of most wiper arms, but I don't think it is the best solution for your problem. It is not a common adjustment that one would make. The size the wipers are based on the size of the windshield and the placement of the wiper mounts as you figured. They are at a fixed length to ensure they get full coverage of the ...


1

The oil pan is not a regular wear item, though it might need to be replaced if it's rusted, cracked and/or leaking. Welding an oil pan is difficult, time consuming and not worth it.


3

As seen in the following diagram, your windshield lateral trim is basically a long deflector that is held in place by several clips. Image source: Hondapartsnow, http://www.hondapartsnow.com/parts-list/1997-honda-accord-4dr_lx_abs-ka-4at/front-windshield.html Assembly #7 serves to deflect airflow, and probably can simply be taken off. Your car will just ...


2

Exactly what @Movemorecommentslinktotop said in his comment ... if the rear rotors, there is a second braking surface inside the rotor "hat" which is for the e-brakes. If you haven't backed these shoes off or if you have the e-brake on, you'll never get these off. The front brakes may be rusted around the hub and are not releasing. They can become "space ...


5

The oil pan is not a normal wear item, however being so low to the ground it is possible to damage it. As the oil pan is not removed for regular inspection, any decision made by the mechanic should be visible to photograph without tools or disassembly, either as physical damage or oil leaking. Have the mechanic put the vehicle on the lift and show to you ...


4

I would check for: cracks, but don't take casting marks for cracks (a picture of your pan would be helpful to tell) scratches stripped plug thread (but then it would already be leaking since you wouldn't be able to tight the plug back ;-)) any deformation especially on the gasket level



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