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8

You are correct that the only extra energy consumed is the electricity used by the blower fan to move the warmed air. In the grand scheme of things the extra fuel required to generate that electricity is miniscule. The coolant is circulated regardless of the heater setting. Moving the selector to cool or warm merely directs all the air over the heater core ...


6

This is normal behavior. The A/C system is turned on to dehumidify the air, which causes the windshield to defog. Without it, your breath would freeze on the inside of the windshield and cause further issues. EDIT: Please note Bob Cross' comments below. I found instructions on the Honda Tech Forum which is supposed to give you full manual control over ...


6

Here's a nice tip: if you turn up the heat in your car, it helps lower the operating temperature of your engine. Sometimes by as much as 10%. Not a problem when you're driving around in icy cold weather, but if your car is overheating, turning on the heat, opening the windows and putting the blower on full could save your engine from popping a gasket. If ...


5

It takes a long time for the heat gauge to register as anything but cold, about 10-15 minutes. This is almost definitely a stuck open thermostat. The engine should reach operation temperature within 10 minutes, meaning middle of the gauge. You should see it start moving up within about 5 minutes


5

Several Possibilities Low Coolant Level Partially plugged up heater core Partially obstructed heater valve Weak water pump


2

Have you checked the coolant level? Possibly the thermostat. Also could be a plugged heater core or even air trapped in the cooling system.


2

A faulty, always open thermostat or a defective radiator temperature sensor would cause the symptoms you describe. When your cooling system sensors send implausible signals to the engine ECU, the ECU turns the fans on to run continuously soon after start-up. The thinking is that an engine running cooler is preferable to an engine being allowed to overheat.


1

There are two things which can be wrong (that I'm aware of) with the heater core. It can be plugged (not letting coolant through), or it can leak. If blocked, there's absolutely no issue. Drive without heat. If it leaks, you'll need to run your heater hoses in a loop, to bypass the heater core. Basically, you are taking one hose from one side (either intake ...


1

Fords often have a heater core bypass that allows coolant to bypass the heater core, kinda like a pressure relief valve. To test it, warm up the engine and pinch the bypass closed (wrap a towel around the hose if you use locking pliers to avoid cutting it) which forces coolant through the heater core. Check to see if you have heat...if so then put a valve ...


1

There is a blend door actuator in the heater box; that should open when you turn the knob to "hot", allowing warm air to come out. It is probably stuck, or it's not operating correctly. Could be a bad actuator, or a problem with the circuit.


1

It sounds like there is something between the blower and the heater core, maybe even on the core itself. It could just be leaves which have gotten sucked in and are now blocking it. When the blend door is is over to the cold side, it blows air just fine. Yet when the blend door is pushing across the heater core, it is greatly reduced. This leads me to ...


1

Could also be failure on heater switch mechanics. It depends on hot/cool selector type but if it is mechanical then select should never feel loose when turning from cool to hot or the other way round. If selector is mechanical which means hot/cool valve is operated by some kind of rigid cable or steel rod and it is not uncommon for them to break at ...


1

Your engine does not have bleed screws on the radiator cooling system. To fully top up your system, fill the radiator with coolant. Run the engine at about 2500 RPM for a couple of minutes. With a large wet rag, soaked in water, to protect your hands from any steam, slowly but slowly undo the coolant filler cap. Top up again with coolant. Do this several ...


1

I have this same problem, and I can tell you exactly what it is. GM vehicles use the coolant DEX-COOL, which is the purple color coolant. In the impala's if the coolant hasn't been changed for a while the dex-cool will leave deposits, or get thick is easier way to think about it. When it runs through your heater core, that silt like deposit will clog the ...



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