Hot answers tagged

11

Basically you have an exhaust leak, it's dangerous (to you in the form of carbon monoxide) and should not be ignored. An easy way to check for the leak is to pull a vacuum line off the intake and suck a small amount (1 - 2oz) of transmission fluid into the intake via that vacuum line. Make sure the vehicle is outside, because it's going to smoke a lot. The ...


10

It sounds like the engine thermostat has failed in an open state. The thermostat regulates the flow of coolant between the radiator and the engine. When the engine needs more heat, it closes and cuts-off flow through the radiator. When the engine needs less heat, it opens and allows flow to the radiator. With the thermostat stuck open, the flow through ...


9

For the majority of brakes, they should be fine after a track day, but the real risks come from significantly overheating the brake fluid, or from stopping with hot brakes and having them cool while parked. This is why at track days it is always recommended that you stop after ten or so laps, if you have standard brake systems, to allow your brake fluid and ...


9

Exhaust inside a car is bad. It can come in through your vents, through the floor, or through the firewall. No matter where it's coming from, you should get it fixed because you can pass out from carbon monoxide, and if the engine keeps running after the crash it could kill you. It probably won't take too much to fix -- the hard part is finding the air ...


8

Are you sure the engine isn't liquid cooled as the newer models are? It's very unusual to have an oil temp gauge on a bike, most likely it's a coolant temperature gauge. The fact it's got a coolant fan would suggest it's liquid cooled, too. I'd check the level of the coolant to see if it's a little low, just to be on the safe side. The simple explanation ...


8

If your guide pins are stuck, the caliper won't be able to slide properly. With a sliding caliper, when you apply the brake, the piston pushes one pad against the disc (rotor), and simultaneously pushes back against the caliper (Newton's equal and opposite reactions), causing the caliper to slide along the guide pins, and pull the other pad against the ...


6

Modern engine preheaters are usually made of flexible heater mats, similar to those used in seat heaters. These are glued to the bottom of the oil pan. This heats the engine oil. This thins the oil allowing it to pump much more quickly which has two effects. 1) The crankshaft spins faster allowing faster start. 2) The oil reaches the bearings much ...


6

There won't be a fault with the windscreen. If it was drawing excessive current, then the fuse for this circuit would blow. There could possibly be a fault with you alternator, in that it is not able to provide the current being drawn by the windscreen, this will then cause the battery to discharge. Another possibility is that the idle speed control valve ...


5

The cheapest way to do so, would be to add something like this aftermarket accessory. Looking for any in-dash options would likely be more expensive.


5

xpda has a very good answer. I would augment it with an additional caution: carbon monoxide effects are cumulative, they don't go away very quickly once you are in fresh air... So driving short periods while exposed to CO, with breaks in between, may still be enough to cause problems. One common cause of exhaust in the cabin that xpda didn't mention is ...


5

From past experience, I've found that headerwrap (a company called Thermotec makes some nice stuff) is a lightweight alternative to replace heat shields.. HOWEVER..I've found that the wrap traps moisture. I had used this stuff on a set of headers and within 2 years (this is in the west coast mind you - no salt or snow), i had 2 primaries rust and ...


5

The heater in a water-cooled car relies on coolant from the engine. Lack of heat together with an overheating engine suggest a cooling system problem. I suggest the following: Check the coolant level. If you're lucky, you're just low on coolant. The question then becomes: where did it go? Is there a leak? Are you burning coolant (sometimes seen as white ...


5

My experience, limited to a few very specific configurations is: I've never had rotor warping issues even after a LOT of heat in the brakes (both from track days and also stuck brakes while driving on the express way). I've used generic NAPA rotors, OEM rotors, and fancy heat/cryo treated ones. I can't tell any difference between any of them. They all ...


5

Ice by itself can have a decent amount of friction. The lack of friction is caused by a thin layer of water that develops between the sliding device and the surface of the ice. As the device slides over the ice it melts the top layer and a thin layer of water comes about. A fast moving tire spins the melted water off the ice faster than it than it can be ...


4

what Larry said, plus - Keep your paint waxed/treated as the UV and heat/sun will burn the finish and the wax off faster. If you are in an area of the state where the wind blows, the sand will add to that as well. Park in the shade as much as you can (have a garage or carport?). Trend toward use of heavier motor oil (usually there is a listed range for a ...


4

Tint your windows and put a Sunshade in the windshield when you park. The interior of your car will last longer and not fade out as quickly. Keep your antifreeze at the correct concentration it raises the boiling point of water as well as lowering the freezing point Keep the grill and radiator clean of bugs and other debris for maximum airflow, this will ...


4

It looks an awful lot like you have diagnosed all of the really hard problems and come up negative. I wonder if you have a simple mechanical problem: is the linkage sound between the hot / cold selector and the flapper valve that forces air past the heater core. From what I hear, the foam around the flapper is also prone to disintegration in humid ...


4

Possible Causes: Coolant Level Thermostat stuck open Heater Control Valve Temperature blend door Plugged heater core Coolant Level Coolant level that's even a little low can affect heater performance. It's near the top of the system so there could be enough coolant to prevent the engine from overheating but not enough to make it through the heater core. ...


3

When replacing break pads it is incorrect and bad practice to simply push the piston back in, this will force brake back up into the master cylinder and sometimes even cause it to overflow. Just about everyone disregards this but it is very possible to damage the Master Cylinder this way. The "correct" way to do it is to open the bleeder screw, push the ...


3

Sounds like a failing A/C compressor. Assuming the car has A/C... A/C compressor is used with the defroster to dry the air.


3

Another option that you could look into is getting an engine block heater fitted. Essentially, you plug those into a wall outlet and they warm up the coolant which both helps with cold starts if you're in a cold climate, and you should get warm air out of the heater fairly quickly compared to a car without a block heater.


3

Where is the water leaking from? If it is from any part of the cooling system then yes, your engine's cooling system will not work as efficiently so it will heat up faster. My guess is that clearing out the rust also exposed a leak somewhere in the radiator.


3

If the engine is warm, the air flow through the heater core is off, and one side of the heater core isn't burning hot like the other, then there's a good chance your heater core has debris in it causing it to block. If your thermostat was stuck open, there's a good chance the engine wouldn't be able to come up to temperature especially on a cold day. If ...


3

I'm thinking @SteveMatthews may be onto something - If the HVAC system is vacuum operated, one of the vacuum actuators is having an issue (ie: leaking). It may be getting adjusted without you having to do anything. When you shift gears, you take your foot off of the "go pedal" (not a gas pedal in this instance because it's diesel power ;-)), which causes a ...


3

First thing to do is check the coolant level, low coolant, even slightly low can affect heater performance. Thermostat stuck open would make the heater air cooler once you started down the road as the increased air flow across the radiator would cool the engine down even more. You could have poor coolant flow through the heater core that gets better when ...


3

A thermocouple merely generates voltage according to the temperature, while an automotive thermostat is basically an autonomous temperature sensitive coolant valve. You can't replace a thermostat with a thermocouple because their functions are completely different. You could replace a coolant sensor with a thermocouple, but resistive sensors are more ...


3

Two points; Teflon tape is not a sealant. It lubricates the threads, so that you can insert the threaded part deeper, and as a side-effect it fills small gaps - but it was never designed as a sealant. Brake fluid dissolves/degrades PTFE. Try Permatex instead, if you want to go this route. If you think you need a seal, you should fix the problem rather ...


2

I forgot to answer this. I found the actuator behind the globebox door. It was actually very easy to install once I found it!


2

Sounds like there might more than one blend door. I guess you're looking for the heater blend door? Have you gone through chevymalibuforum.com? From this, you might be able to get at it through the glovebox? When all else fails, consult the factory service manual. Unfortunately, in your case, it's $200 new. They sometimes turn up on ebay, but it looks ...


2

I've checked the lines into the heater core and neither one of them seems to be hot. You may have a stuck open thermostat. Does the dash temp gauge needle sit in the middle zone?



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