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9

It sounds like the engine thermostat has failed in an open state. The thermostat regulates the flow of coolant between the radiator and the engine. When the engine needs more heat, it closes and cuts-off flow through the radiator. When the engine needs less heat, it opens and allows flow to the radiator. With the thermostat stuck open, the flow through ...


9

For the majority of brakes, they should be fine after a track day, but the real risks come from significantly overheating the brake fluid, or from stopping with hot brakes and having them cool while parked. This is why at track days it is always recommended that you stop after ten or so laps, if you have standard brake systems, to allow your brake fluid and ...


5

My experience, limited to a few very specific configurations is: I've never had rotor warping issues even after a LOT of heat in the brakes (both from track days and also stuck brakes while driving on the express way). I've used generic NAPA rotors, OEM rotors, and fancy heat/cryo treated ones. I can't tell any difference between any of them. They all ...


5

Basically you have an exhaust leak, it's dangerous (to you in the form of carbon monoxide) and should not be ignored. An easy way to check for the leak is to pull a vacuum line off the intake and suck a small amount (1 - 2oz) of transmission fluid into the intake via that vacuum line. Make sure the vehicle is outside, because it's going to smoke a lot. The ...


5

The heater in a water-cooled car relies on coolant from the engine. Lack of heat together with an overheating engine suggest a cooling system problem. I suggest the following: Check the coolant level. If you're lucky, you're just low on coolant. The question then becomes: where did it go? Is there a leak? Are you burning coolant (sometimes seen as white ...


4

Are you sure the engine isn't liquid cooled as the newer models are? It's very unusual to have an oil temp gauge on a bike, most likely it's a coolant temperature gauge. The fact it's got a coolant fan would suggest it's liquid cooled, too. I'd check the level of the coolant to see if it's a little low, just to be on the safe side. The simple explanation ...


4

From past experience, I've found that headerwrap (a company called Thermotec makes some nice stuff) is a lightweight alternative to replace heat shields.. HOWEVER..I've found that the wrap traps moisture. I had used this stuff on a set of headers and within 2 years (this is in the west coast mind you - no salt or snow), i had 2 primaries rust and ...


4

what Larry said, plus - Keep your paint waxed/treated as the UV and heat/sun will burn the finish and the wax off faster. If you are in an area of the state where the wind blows, the sand will add to that as well. Park in the shade as much as you can (have a garage or carport?). Trend toward use of heavier motor oil (usually there is a listed range for a ...


4

Tint your windows and put a Sunshade in the windshield when you park. The interior of your car will last longer and not fade out as quickly. Keep your antifreeze at the correct concentration it raises the boiling point of water as well as lowering the freezing point Keep the grill and radiator clean of bugs and other debris for maximum airflow, this will ...


4

It looks an awful lot like you have diagnosed all of the really hard problems and come up negative. I wonder if you have a simple mechanical problem: is the linkage sound between the hot / cold selector and the flapper valve that forces air past the heater core. From what I hear, the foam around the flapper is also prone to disintegration in humid ...


4

If your guide pins are stuck, the caliper won't be able to slide properly. With a sliding caliper, when you apply the brake, the piston pushes one pad against the disc (rotor), and simultaneously pushes back against the caliper (Newton's equal and opposite reactions), causing the caliper to slide along the guide pins, and pull the other pad against the ...


4

The cheapest way to do so, would be to add something like this aftermarket accessory. Looking for any in-dash options would likely be more expensive.


4

Possible Causes: Coolant Level Thermostat stuck open Heater Control Valve Temperature blend door Plugged heater core Coolant Level Coolant level that's even a little low can affect heater performance. It's near the top of the system so there could be enough coolant to prevent the engine from overheating but not enough to make it through the heater core. ...


3

Where is the water leaking from? If it is from any part of the cooling system then yes, your engine's cooling system will not work as efficiently so it will heat up faster. My guess is that clearing out the rust also exposed a leak somewhere in the radiator.


3

xpda has a very good answer. I would augment it with an additional caution: carbon monoxide effects are cumulative, they don't go away very quickly once you are in fresh air... So driving short periods while exposed to CO, with breaks in between, may still be enough to cause problems. One common cause of exhaust in the cabin that xpda didn't mention is ...


3

Exhaust inside a car is bad. It can come in through your vents, through the floor, or through the firewall. No matter where it's coming from, you should get it fixed because you can pass out from carbon monoxide, and if the engine keeps running after the crash it could kill you. It probably won't take too much to fix -- the hard part is finding the air ...


3

If the engine is warm, the air flow through the heater core is off, and one side of the heater core isn't burning hot like the other, then there's a good chance your heater core has debris in it causing it to block. If your thermostat was stuck open, there's a good chance the engine wouldn't be able to come up to temperature especially on a cold day. If ...


2

Keep a close eye on your hoses and seals. We've had some issues with hoses drying out (we are in the high desert in California) in cars that live outside.


2

So when your car doesn't start, what happens? does the engine turn over? or you just get some clicking but nothing else? If the engine does turn over, but doesn't get going, then it could be the injectors. This is just a guess, but its easily verifiable. Attach a fuel pressure gauge to your car (or suggest this to your mechanic), let it run, then stop the ...


2

I've checked the lines into the heater core and neither one of them seems to be hot. You may have a stuck open thermostat. Does the dash temp gauge needle sit in the middle zone?


2

On defrost, it is running the A/C (to dry the air), so you're correct on that point. Just usually there's enough heat available to overcome the cooling effect. Sounds like you may have either a clogged heater core (a lot of labor to fix on most cars), or hopefully just a failed actuator (not sure if the Taurus has a mechanical linkage or electronic). ...


2

Sounds like a failing A/C compressor. Assuming the car has A/C... A/C compressor is used with the defroster to dry the air.


2

I forgot to answer this. I found the actuator behind the globebox door. It was actually very easy to install once I found it!


2

Had similar issue in Skoda Felicia (which is much like an older Golf) I own. Check these steps: Close the salon heater. Start the car, wait till coolant gets to its normal temperature. Now open salon heater to the max and check if it readily blows hot air. The air will be hot at first, but quickly loose temperature. Close the salon heater, wait ~5-7min and ...


2

I'm speculating that the under-filled condition resulted in the water pump being unable to move coolant through the radiator (maybe the water pump itself wasn't getting coolant, maybe the level was so low that it couldn't complete the circuit through the radiator and back). Why you blew a hose is a bit of a mystery...if you were making too much pressure, ...


2

When replacing break pads it is incorrect and bad practice to simply push the piston back in, this will force brake back up into the master cylinder and sometimes even cause it to overflow. Just about everyone disregards this but it is very possible to damage the Master Cylinder this way. The "correct" way to do it is to open the bleeder screw, push the ...


2

With the brake piston fully compressed the pads should have a little clearance, enabling minor "play." When replacing brake pads it is important to make sure that the caliper itself moves freely in the horizontal direction (i.e., perpendicularly to the disc.) If not, one pad will wear quickly due to the fact that it will maintain pressure against the ...


2

All of the other answers are great, but I just want to add that rotors are very, very hard to "warp" from 'normal' use (including track day abuse). Any variance in thickness is because pad material has transferred from the pad to the rotor. Turning the rotor gets rid of this. See "Warped Brake Disc And Other Myths".


2

Make sure the cooling system hoses aren't kinked and are routed properly. Make sure the coolant levels are good. If the coolant level isn't proper, there could be an air bubble in the heater core which would prevent/hinder the heat. Is it not blowing? If so, check the fuses - specifically the engine compartment fuse box, slot 6 (3rd from the front, left ...


2

If the heater hose is hot going into the core, this means there is flow through it. If it wasn't getting flow through it, it wouldn't get very hot ... warm, maybe, but not hot. My suggestion here is it may be the blend door which is not functioning correctly. If you are unsure what the blend door is, it's the piece inside next to the HVAC unit which directs ...



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