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7

That process you're describing is VERY familiar to me - I do that for people from time to time. The difference is REALLY SIGNIFICANT... and at most it should take you five minutes of actual work per headlight - it's really pretty minimal, with diminishing returns VERY quickly. ALWAYS WET-SAND. Do NOT dry-sand. Start with nothing less than #600 sandpaper, ...


4

Do you have a Pulsar 220? If so, you probably don't want two full-blown headlights, if the electrical system on a 220 is anything like that of the 135LS. On my bike, the electricals can barely keep up with all the lights on, plus both signal lights blinking (unless I raise the idling speed). You should probably look into adding accessory lights, instead. ...


4

Bulbs - Swap the bulbs, like the comment suggested, with the ones on the other side. If works switch back and get replacement. Fuse - Swap the fuse with another in the fuse box with the same rating. If works switch back and get replacement. Connectors - Check for corrosion on connectors. Clean connectors with fine grade sand paper. Coat in something ...


3

The bulb modules could actually be bad, despite both filaments coming on in high beam mode. Pull the connector at each bulb, there will be three wires: tan, green and black. The black is ground, tan is low and green is high. Make sure there is power on the tan wire when the headlights are on and the high/low switch is set to low. If the tan wire is hot, ...


3

A poor ground will give you the symptoms you are seeing. A wiring diagram will show you that there is a ground but not where it is located. The diagram I found shows a frame ground that is a black wire. I would start by looking for the black wire on the offending headlight and follow it away from the light as far as you can. If you are lucky at some point ...


2

As I said previously, a set of Osram bulbs would help a lot. Further to that, your headlights may just need a nice polish. Some people try to get real fancy with products and methods, but what it really comes down to is that you need to use various grades of sandpaper (from rough to very fine) and finish off with rubbing compound and/or liquid polish (I use ...


2

The first question is easy to answer - find your local automotive parts supplier and they will be able to look up and supply the correct bulb type for you. I would expect it to be either H1 or H3. Getting to the bulb is often harder - it varies a lot by car. I think the Focus is a more traditional design, so hopefully you can get to it without having to ...


2

"Maintenance Free" doesn't have anything to do with charging rate or charging frequency. "Maintenance Free" means that the manufacturer didn't provide any means of maintaining the water/acid level in the battery, which means that if a battery boils dry you can only replace it instead of refilling it yourself with water or acid, whichever is appropriate ...


2

I followed TDHofstetter's advice (partly) and I can now report that it is indeed quite effective. I wet-sanded with 600, 1200 and 2000 grit sandpaper (my local hardware store had nothing in between or finer). That removed the yellow discoloration and left the lenses smooth to the touch, but still a little cloudy. I then applied the Mother NuLens polish, ...


1

Probably much cheaper solution to your problem could be more powerful light bulbs. I had same issue with Mitsubishi Galant EA0 and was considering xenons, but after some research I ended up changing bulbs to 100w "extra light" ones. These look like xenons, are much brighter and does not need any extra work or resources. Just to be more specific about the ...


1

Early Xenon light conversions were totally unsuitable for vehicle use because they did not form a distinct beam or focused pattern. Later kits include lamp assemblies which very much correct these faults. Xenon are used on dipped beams because of the time lag from turning them on and thier reaching operating luminosity. European law requires main beams to ...


1

I would bet the problem lies in the relay, which should be located under the hood. It should look something like this: Each of the high beams and low beams will have their own relay. The switch which is only used to energize the relay. The relay provides the power for the head lights. The underhood fuse box should look like this: On the underside of ...


1

This thread on a motorbike forum suggests that an H4 bulb will fit in an HS1 holder, but that the bike in their question has a plastic lens that could melt - yours may be the same? Does the alternator have enough power to run the higher-wattage bulb and recharge the battery? I would always use a relay when upgrading or adding lamps, Halogens work much ...


1

Basically your headlamps are controlled by a computer. The Front Electronic Module (FEM) to be exact. The FEM grounds the headlamps when it wants to turn them on. This system was an early Multiplex design that reduced wire and total circuits where the modules communicate on a single serial line, now referred to as the CAN Bus (Controller Area Network). You ...


1

I think to pull a fuse is easy, as disconnect the battery. Anyway, I think some relay is broken. That will explain, why it flashing randomly. Turn the lights on and pull the relays under the dashboard one after another, until the light are off. Replace this relay ( shop or maybe you see the same one at another place).Hope, that will fix your issue.


1

I believe they are calling it the Outer Bumper Grill, Driver's Side .


1

I don't think I'd be very concerned about the "sealing wipe" not drying. As Juann pointed out, your conditions seem to be good for drying, so either it's as dry as it'll get or else something's interfering with it drying. For future reference, you can use ordinary car wax after wet-sanding with 2000-grit sandpaper. The car wax MUST be a "100% carnauba" ...


1

It is worth making sure that the bulbs are getting their full voltage - Halogen lamps drop off in brightness significantly as voltage drops. Many cars of that age didn't have relayed headlamps, and so as the wiring has aged, it's resistance has increased, and the performance of the headlamps will suffer - fitting relays close to the lamps with new, good ...


1

There is a relay in the fuse box under the hood on the driver's side. On a 2004, it's #46 and labeled 'HDM Relay'. YMMV. You can swap it with a known good relay (same type from the box for something you know is working). #45 should be the same (on a 2004 at least) and should be the engine fan clutch. If the headlights work after the swap, swap them back ...


1

You're referring to recalls 07V452000 and 12V397000, right? If the recall has not expired, a dealer should perform the fix without charging you. The only way to know for sure is to contact a Suzuki Dealer or Suzuki and ask. The Dealer should be able to look the VIN up and give you a definitive answer as to whether the fix was applied to your vehicle. ...


1

This is what you can do ... The model of the headlight might be on the discharge tube itself. I had the problem with my vehicle where I ordered what I thought were the right replacement bulbs for the fog lamps (H7) and found them to be the wrong ones. I went and bought another set (H11) and they were wrong as well. I took the lamp out and discovered they ...


1

Got this sorted in the end. For this specific model of car (EU spec Ford Focus MK1 [1998 to 2004 in Europe]) the bulb sizes are going to be H4 or H7, depending on whether you need a double filament bulb. The easiest way to tell before you start taking stuff apart is simply look in the head lamp - if you have three bulbs in there, you need H7 and if you only ...



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