Hot answers tagged

6

It really looks like it's down to the switch, if the high beams work normally (Not just using flash to pass) and both low beams quit at the same time, and you are positive the bulbs are good. The one thing that can fail that would take out both low beams is the switch. Everything in yellow below is good based on your description of what works. The pink ...


5

The main purpose for this is so other drivers can see your turn signal. The LED lights are so intense, they do not allow the oncoming driver to be able to see the turn signal. By turning the LEDs off, it becomes readily apparent.


4

Yes there is, but first a little story to explain why the headlights are going yellow/cloudy so quickly. Any plastic headlight lens will yellow through exposure to UV radiation (which the Sun happens to have buckets of). Brand-new plastic lenses from the factory will invariably have a protective coating that is designed to deflect away much of the UV ...


4

H11 Bulb connectors are readily available from Ebay sellers, but will no doubt be available from an automotive shop. They usually come with short wires fitted, so you will need some way of connecting it to you existing wires after chopping off the old connector. The best way of doing this is soldering and heat shrinking some insulation. An alternative to ...


4

I would not want to increase load to your dynamo. I'm skeptical that you actually have that type of charging system but can't back my claim. IF it is a dynamo then I would do something in order to add your accessory lighting load. - Replace your current headlight with an LED version, it will consume less electricity and give you room to add the accessory ...


3

As @Zaid said for the reasons for yellowing/clouding is spot on: UV rays. As for the fix, I would do it slightly different. First, you can use toothpaste to clean off the lens. This works to a degree, but to do the proper fix, take the wet sanding approach. Start by using a heavier grit wet sand paper, then use progressively finer wet sand paper. The idea ...


3

You have another issue The battery doesn't sound like to the core issue that you are experiencing. I propose that your stator or rectifier have gone bad thus you are experiencing a situation where you have to have your battery serviced. The motorcycle should be 'servicing your battery' and charging it as you ride the motorcycle. You will want to test ...


3

This post got way longer than I wanted it to be, but you've shown effort and I have some knowledge that could help you. Please read through this fully before starting any of it. This is information is based off the wiring schematics for a non-russian 2003 Ford Focus. Surprisingly, the russian model is quite a bit different. Regardless of if you have ...


3

You are describing symptoms of a bad ground in your electrical system. Check your ground on the battery. The negative post. Make sure you have a solid connection. The clamp on the negative shouldn't wiggle or have any play in it. Check for corrosion. The white powdery substance. If you find any remove the battery post clamp from the wire and use baking ...


3

A lot of times, I use a "water in a pipe" analogy when I think about electricity. In order to explain why the lights dim when you start the car, consider the following: your car, on average, uses a reasonable amount of electricity. This electricity can be considered equivalent to water flowing through a pipe, let's say a 2-inch pipe. When you turn your ...


2

A quick Google search resulted in this. I couldn't find the legend for it but I guess it should be fairly straightforward. It could be bad wiring, bring out the multi-meter! EDIT Here's a link to the COMPLETE SERVICE MANUAL . It's in German, so you may need to use a translation service .


2

These days you do not bother with replacing the lens cover because it's a sealed unit. Just buy a whole new assembly from your favorite web parts supplier (eg. Amazon, Rockauto, eBay), local auto parts, or a Toyota dealer ($$$). Look for "Parking/Turn Signal Lamp Assembly" or similar for the make and year of your car. The genuine Toyota part will be ...


2

The first place to look for the headlights would be the fuse panel(s). Often there are two: one inside the passenger compartment, either at the driver or passenger kick panel or on the side of the dash where the door covers the dash on the driver side. The other is the engine compartment (in a black plastic box--diagram will be on the inside cover or on the ...


2

My suggestion is that the filament inside of the bulb is loose. When you rap on it, it reconnect briefly, which lights the bulb. It will continue to do this until it completely burns out. This will probably require a replacement bulb to fix.


2

Your headlights are a four headlight system. These are sealed beam headlights. Two of the bulbs are strictly for high-beam use (inside bulbs). Two of the headlights function for both hi/low beams (outside bulbs). In each of the hi/low bulbs, there are two separate filaments which work for either of the modes. What is going on with your headlights is the ...


2

Possibly a problem with the computer that controls them (which might be the BCM - Body Control Module, or might be a separate dedicated module). A friend of mine had the same problem with a 2001 BMW, and water had got into said module through a perished seal and shorted a number of connections within it, causing the lights to go on and off at seemingly ...


2

The part should be available at any automotive shop. Alternately, you can check junkyards. Be sure to cut the wires at about 6" to give you wires to connect to.


2

GE makes a line of Nighthawk LED headlights which might be suitable. They claim to exceed all DOT requirements, and they also claim to be less obnoxious to oncoming drivers than HID lamps. They're promoted as being highly durable and suitable for off-road use. Sylvania produces the XEVO line There are also many smaller companies offering LED headlights, ...


2

The prime suspects here would be: a low-beam relay that is sticking a bad contact at the light switch/stalk break in the low-beam wiring I'd start with the relay since it is the easiest to test.


2

The pictured tape, or any double sided tape for that matter, will fail quickly. Even the industrial 3M VHB tape isn't worth spit, under the hood. Zip tie or find a natural crevice for it if possible and the leads are long enough.


2

Wesayner explains how this works, but admits that the measurement is subjective. It's not a good way to tell the state of your battery, but it will tell you if a dead battery is the reason your engine won't start (or, more specifically, won't turn over.) The starter is connected to the battery by a relay: the keyswitch operates an electromagnet, that ...


2

While your're checking fuses, don't overlook the connector(s) on the headlights themselves. Sometimes they fail over time and other times due to people putting higher wattage bulbs than the connectors can handle.


1

Some headlight 'variants' are the same bulb, with the same or a similar connector, but different wiring. 9004 and 9007 4656 and H4 Because you asked, you absolutely can fix it. There are locking tabs on the terminals in the connectors, you can insert a small, flat pick (there are specific tools for doing so), depin the connector, and repin it into the ...


1

Your battery might have died or is in its last legs, when you start the motorcycle the start motor consumes a lot of energy and thus it causes shut down on the headlights and other electronic stuff, in my case it happened to be my instrument cluster. After running a while the alternator will charge the battery again and so the lamps come on. To test the ...


1

Possibly YES you can do it. But beware you will definitely reduce the life of your battery since it will be difficult for it to handle Bi xenon low at 60w. Upgrade your battery(Possibly higher AMP rating) also make sure while initial installation all the wiring is properly done since a short circuit on a 60w projector will burn through your reflector.


1

Problems like this tend to be water related. Water gets into a fuse box or wiring harness and the head lights are the symptom. Another possible cause is if the truck has automatic head lights, that is they come on automatically when it gets dark. A malfunction in that system can also cause the head lights to come on.


1

My Ride: Dodge 2002 Grand Caravan Sport I just fixed this problem on my car. Take off the FCM (Front Control Module) This is the metal box directly in front of the fuse center, next to the battery. You'll have to take off the cover of the fuse box. The FCM is held in by four torx screws. Clean the flat metal terminals by sanding them. Give them ...


1

Position your vehicle to aim your headlights against a wall so you can see where the headlights are pointing. There or torx screws located above each headlight inside the engine compartment as well as the sides. The torx size is a #15. Turn the screws in and out to adjust each headlamp independently of the other until they are positioned properly. Here ...


1

If both headlights cease to work at the same time, this leads us to the idea that the fault is probably not in the bulbs, but in some part that is on a common path between the electrical supply and the lights. Some points you could take a look at are: Fuse! This is probably the easiest explanation. Take a look in your fuse box (often under the dash, ...


1

When looking at the car (and I think you have most of it already covered in your question): The leading edges are the most susceptible ... this would include any part of the front fascia The A-pillar and maybe the leading edge of the roof Any part of the side which when looking at it, dips in, then comes back out ... the part which comes back out is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible