Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Yes you need to replace the grease when you replace the boot. That grease lubricates the joint, if you don't have enough inside the boot the joint can fail prematurely. On a side note don't use one of the quick boots (the ones designed to be put on without taking the CV joint off of the car), in my experience they are worthless. Here is an example of a ...


5

Remove the shaft, and throw the boot away. Clean out the old dirty grease, after cleaning the part of course, and replace both the grease and boot. This gives you a chance to inspect the joint, and clean up any dirt residue that will speed up the deterioration of the CV joint.


5

I have never had problems with corrosion so I have not used dielectric grease on any of my car's battery terminals. If the battery already has corrosion on the terminals, then I would recommend disconnecting the terminals using a wire brush to clean off the buildup and then reconnecting the leads. If there is no corrosion then I would recommend just ...


5

I'm not sure how long any sort of grease would last before it worked its way out? I'd be tempted to go for a more mechanical solution (if you have access to appropriate tools, or a frielndly machine shop) - drill a small hole in the socket and tap it to a suitable thread, then insert a grub screw to bear onto the side of the ball and stop it moving. That ...


5

I would apply a light coating of white lithium grease. It is thin enough that it it won't be wiped off the shaft sliding through the bearings. It also is resistant to getting washed off by rain or routine washing. The light coating of grease should keep the shaft from seizing in the bearings.


4

You state the mirrors are anodized aluminum, but if the ball or socket are steel, you might try (gasp) intentionally rusting one of the surfaces. Here's one technique for accomplishing that.


3

Low-tech fix: If you can find a way to grip it, you may be able to use a hammer and drift punch or very small chisel in order to pound/indent the lip of the socket (hole) inward toward the hole which has the effect of squeezing the socket tighter around the ball. Probably hard to do, but worth a mention.


3

Evaporated / sprayed electrolyte is corrosive. If you see corrosion on the battery posts, the leads, or in the vicinity, that's why. A layer of silicone dielectric grease over the exposed metal parts will protect them. I especially like to get some on the threads of screws in that area, to make sure they come apart easily in the future. You want as much ...


3

I always use brake cleaner for all metal parts, some of which could be related to actual brakes. It's good for for anything from gears to axles, bearing races, rotors.


2

You lube the bearings until all the old grease is out. Can't really tell if 14oz is enough, but if using one of those fancy repackers, it might be. If replacing all together, just make sure there is enough grease in them. Some come pre-greased, but I would repack anyways. Can never really tell how long they been sitting in a parts room.


2

This is an educated assumption... In geology a mineral's hardness is measured according to different scales. A common one is Mohs scale of hardness, which ranks minerals from softest (talc) to hardest (diamond). The only way a mineral can scratch the other, is for the mohs hardness value to be higher. Now, according to the link: Graphite - 1.5 Copper - 3 ...


1

You should not need any more grease than what it takes to pack the bearing itself. Packing the entire wheel hub assembly is not only a waste, it's also not wise. When you go to change bearings or repack them in the future, you'll need to clean all of that old grease out. This is not a good idea. As an aside, I pack new bearings which may or may not have been ...


1

If you're greasing bearings, the rule of thumb you can fall back on is to apply as much grease as you would apply frosting on a cupcake (don't be silly, you know exactly what I mean). Excess grease will be expelled while you're tightening the retainer nut anyway.


1

I'm not familiar with your piece of equipment, but in general, yes it's okay to clean an engine compartment. Just don't use an inflammable degreaser. I like Krud Kutter or Simple Green at full concentration. Let it sit a few minutes then spray it down with a hose. Keep in mind afterwards you might want to spray some clean oil wherever there are moving parts ...


1

By all means yes. It is a good practice to grease the axle prior installation.


1

ih8mud.com forums is a great resource for land cruisers with an extremely loyal following - I own an 80 series and use it for reference and help for all kinds of maintenance.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible