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8

Probably not. The engine is going to be running faster than normal to make highway speeds in 3rd, if she got going fast enough it was probably pretty loud. Depending on the vehicle there may be a rev limiter to prevent the engine from running at too high a speed. Teach her to hear what the truck sounds like when it is time to shift if you can.


5

There are two main reasons: So that both sides of the brake equation are equal. This means they are both starting at the same place again. When you purchase brake pads, they come in sets for both sides. Since you have to purchase new brake pads anyway, you should put them on there or it's a waste of money.


5

The only reason for replacing both at the same time is so that they brake evenly. This is more essential on the front of the vehicle. If you were to stamp on the brakes in an emergency, you wouldn't want the car to swerve into oncoming cars because the brake on one side of your car worked better than the other. Edit - make that 3 reasons if you add ...


5

On the 97 Sonoma the controls are electronic and send a signal to a vacuum switch block which will send vacuum to various valves. This is from a corvette but is similar. While the switches on the control panel can fail more commonly the vacuum lines, check valve or vacuum reservoir will fail first. Locate the vacuum source line and measure engine ...


5

There are three places I can think the water would be flowing out of from the back area of the engine. The engine in your Yukon should be the GenI Small Block Chevrolet (SBC) engine (I believe they started putting LSx motors in them in 1999). The SBC has water passages through the intake manifold at the front and back of the engine. If one of these passages ...


4

Looks like I may have answered my own question last night. I did a deep clean on the throttle body (and as far back in as I could access). The idle is HUGELY improved, though still not perfect on this 28° morning. Is that really all it was? I'd love to hear your comments if you've had the same experience.


4

Answer in progress. California Consumer Protections Although California Civil Code (section 1793.03) specify three-year minimum (seven years for sets or appliances priced $100 and up) for electronics and household appliances (regardless of warranty), I could not find similar provision in that particular law for the automotive parts availability. However, ...


4

You have a leak in the system. You can't use the pressure to tell if you have the correct amount of Freon. If you were using a recovery machine that weighed the amount of recovered Freon you would see that you are loosing Freon. Not only is Freon leaking out, non condensable gas (ie air) is getting in. This is causing your pressures to look right even though ...


4

H11 Bulb connectors are readily available from Ebay sellers, but will no doubt be available from an automotive shop. They usually come with short wires fitted, so you will need some way of connecting it to you existing wires after chopping off the old connector. The best way of doing this is soldering and heat shrinking some insulation. An alternative to ...


4

With that much line replaced, it's going to take some effort to bleed. Somebody has to sit and pump the brake, while somebody else works each bleeder nipple starting at the furthest from the MC (probably right rear) to the nearest. Another option is to slightly crack all nipples on all calipers (rear cylinders probably on a 98 Jimmy) and just let them ...


3

Along with what @Zaid said, which I agree with, there are two other aspects to worry about: Antilock Brake System (ABS) Traction control (I'm not sure your Sierra has this, but it bears mentioning) The problem with the ABS is, with that much of a difference, your ABS will believe there is a fault with the system and shut it down or might believe the ...


3

In your case if it's diesel it has a turbo, if it's gas it doesn't. At least from the factory. Now that is specific to the year make and model in your question. As for what they look like. Nick has a good explanation. In this picture it's just to the left of the long green tube in the middle of the picture. That tube is connected to the turbo by a short ...


3

Here is the schematic showing how the mega fuse should be wired in, you obviously don't have the second battery option but that mega fuse is on vehicles with only one battery as well. You can tell for sure by checking the option label (approx 3x5 inch white label with black writing with a bunch of 3 digit codes) in the glove box. If you have ZM9 listed then ...


3

In my experience, washer jets tend to clog at the actual jet - first thing I'd do is get a thin needle and try to clear the jet itself.


3

But if it's my starter shouldn't I hear a noise Not if the starter solenoid is stuck. This is the piece of metal that connects the circuit and allows the starter motor to receive power. It's usually pulled into place magnetically, thereby connecting two terminals and powering the motor. When solenoids age, they tend to stick, or, in some cases, physically ...


3

Given the description of the problem, I think the comments are exactly right, this is an issue with your transmission. Now you need to determine if it's just fluid level, or if there is something more serious going on. Couple of things you can do, first, follow the instructions in the comment by @DucatiKiller. That will get you into the proper fill level. ...


3

As was pointed out, the outer diameter isn't quite the same, but it's not a major problem. The sole distinction I would be worried about would be load range. For example, an E350 van most likely wants to have a LT, E load rated set of tires installed. However, if the tires on your Savanna are P rated (i.e. not Light Truck), I would not install those on your ...


3

It's most likely two separate circuits, and two separate issues. Your interior lights, as you pointed out, work when you jiggle the switch. So, if you pull the switch out, and connect the wires directly, does the interior light stay on constant? If so, it's the switch. As for the headlights: Stupid, obvious, obligatory question: You've tried replacing the ...


3

Heck yeah! Short answer: Replace the check valve. Long answer: There is a check valve between the vacuum reservoir and the rest of the system. What that does is help the vacuum reservoir hold more vacuum. Your engine won't have enough vacuum "force" to move the heating ventilation doors without the reservoir. The check valve is that little black and ...


3

As far as the 4wd thing goes, this is normal operation when on dry pavement. You are actually causing the transfer case to bind. This happens when the steering is hard over. The bind comes from the difference while you are turning from the front wheels to the back wheels. The transfer case is designed for the vehicle to go straight. You shouldn't notice it ...


2

I finally figured out what the problem is here. GM apparently has put in a "PassLock" system that reads something to do with the key on startup. If anything goes wrong (invalid key, electrical problems, etc) the fuel system is disabled for 10 minutes. Just thought I would let everyone know in case this problem comes up again. I have not actually fixed the ...


2

In the end the mechanic discovered it was caused by bad oil, it was not head gasket problem, just clogged drain on the front end of the engine and nearly clogged in the back. So, when the vehicle was tilted forward, the oil failed to drain, and was forced through and burned off.


2

Does the car have a turbocharger? If so, the seals in that could have gone, which would result in oil leaking into the exhaust. I'm assuming that photo is taken from underneath the car looking up? In which case the oil could have leaked from somewhere further up and run down onto the exhaust joint we can see. Does the smoke come out of the exhaust at the ...


2

These vehicles are bad for bad distributor caps. They get carboned tracked and it doesn't take much moisture to cause a no start, but run normally when it's dry. Replace the cap and rotor, check that the vents in the base plate are not clogged and any vent lines (vacuum lines for venting) if equipped are unobstructed.


2

Most like a crack in a coil, igniter module, or distributor (probably a coil with a 2000 MY GM vehicle).


2

The PMGR stands for permanent magnet gear reduction. I can't find anything on SD255. Doing some searching at Auto Zone and Advance Auto parts showed images that all looked the same, a typical Chevy starter. I would contact a local parts store see if they have one in stock. Pull your starter out bring it with you to match it up and have it tested. Most stores ...


2

Turbochargers look like large snails, and are fitted in the first part of the exhaust, between the manifold and the downpipe. They're often paired with an intercooler, which looks like another radiator... The Wikipedia page for the Suburban suggests that only the Diesel version of the ninth generation were so fitted (which seems odd from a European ...


2

Sounds like the transmission is slipping. Check the fluid level, it that's correct take it back to the shop that just serviced the transmission.


2

Your torque convertor has a convertor lock-up clutch. When reaching a nominal speed and engine RPM the convertor comes on and locks the convertor forming a slip free drive. When you use kick-down or near full throttle acceleration, the convertor clutch unlocks. This allows the stator in the convertor to allow torque multiplication and give the vehicle its ...


2

This should be what your engine oil cooler lines look like in the vehicle: If the oil leak was coming from the block (middle of the vehicle), part #1 should be what they changed to stop the leak. This would be the most likely place for a leak to occur in this system. The lines going forward should carry oil to the radiator, where heat is exchanged. In ...



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