Hot answers tagged

9

If your speedometer is accurate, you can check that with your GPS or phone as well. The only real option is the cluster (The thing with all the gauges and odometer). You can send it off to have it repaired, or get a used one from a junk yard. If you ever sell the car you are legally bound in most (if not all) US states to tell the buyer of an odometer ...


7

There's no standard. It depends on the fuel gauge sensor, the feed location in the fuel tank, the length and size of the fuel line, and the size of other items in the fuel line such as inline fuel filter and carburetor/injector setup.


5

I maybe know a better way for you. I saw it at some customer tyre and was very impressed. TYRE VALVE CAPS WITH PRESSURE INDICATOR :D They exist for different pressure ranges. So everything you need to do, just go around your car sometimes and look that they are green. If they are yellow or red, you lost some pressure.


4

While your speedometer sounds particularly inaccurate, the simple fact is that almost all car manufacturers design their speedometers to be inaccurate because of speed legislation in many countries: From thecarexpert.co.uk, EU law says that A speedo must never show less than the actual speed, and must never show more than 110% of actual speed + 6.25mph. ...


4

It looks like the entire instrument cluster is intermittently losing power. Loose wiring, particularly bad ground wire(s) should be your first suspect. Find the wiring harness(es) that plug into the back of the cluster and check that they are secure. Follow them around behind the dashboard to see if anything else is loose. You may find a ground wire for the ...


4

Your sample may just be non-representative. All the ones I know (I'm mostly into Japanese performance cars) have oil temps. Even many non-performance cars have an indicator that goes out once the engine is up to temperature (such as my wife's Honda Jazz) I think cars like the M135i have some cost based design decisions in order to meet their price point - ...


4

Disconnect the fuel gauge sending wire from the fuel tank sending unit, with key on the fuel gauge will either go to Full or empty, now ground the fuel sender wire to a good ground, the gauge should do a full sweep to the opposite end of the gauge. If you get no change on the gauge during this test you either have a bad gauge or a break in the sender wire ...


4

Do you know what each gauge is rated at for current carrying capacity? I would think a daisy chain is fine as long as the wire gauge is large enough. Don't neglect to use the same gauge of wire for both power(DC+) and ground. I'd look at the specs for each display gauge, add a bit of safety margin, then add the current up and calculate the wire gauge ...


3

I'll go with a combination of the standard overstating of mileage on the car (well put by Rory) and also GPS inaccuracy... I've been doing Road Rally for a long time and a big part of that is precision mileage measurement. As an instrument rated pilot, I also have a strong interest in GPS navigation. One of the things I learned when experimenting with ...


3

You can get valve caps that indicate tyre pressures on them in a Red/Amber/Green state. They are available in a range of different pressures so you could replace your normal valve caps with them which would stop you even having to remove them to check the pressure. You can find more by searching for Valve Cap Pressure Indicators


3

You don't want to put it in the hose as it would then destabilize the hose and it would never seal or be viable afterwards. You could possibly split the hose and put a housing in-line to house the sensor, but putting a temp sensor in a hose will not give you the correct engine temperature. It is not the coolant circulated throughout the engine, but bypassed ...


3

The sensor end of the gas gauge is a rheostat. What occurs is the part of the rheostat goes "dead", or no longer reads as it should, which is why it drops to dead empty. To fix this, you need to put in a new tank sensor, which is usually collocated with the fuel pump in the tank.


2

Considering that all cars after 96 I believe have OBD installed, it is possible to make a device that records your every move (I am actually making one as we speak). ODB may do this already (the car needs this info for other tasks). However, this is not necessarily court approved and depending on the offense and the level of court it may not be admissible.


2

Sadly, I don't know which of the two main types of TPMS Infiniti use, powered or passive (see this Wikipedia article for some explanation), but my guess would be powered, and that one of the chassis mounted antennae is marginal on gain so has trouble getting a reading under some conditions. Maybe the antenna has had some damage - worth a check.


2

I think the usual advice is to check them as part of your 'weekly' checks (the ones that hardly anyone actually does every week, or even month!), along with the lights, tyre tread etc. I certainly wouldn't bother for a 20 mile trip, unless I had a known slow puncture that I was monitoring. I usually just check them whenever I remember to do so - although I ...


2

Actually checking your tire pressure should usually be a monthly maintenance item. If you make a habit of it, checking other items at the same time is a good idea as well, such as your coolant and oil levels (though, checking your oil a little more often is a good thing, say weekly). Something you can do is get used to where your tires sit (the "squish" if ...


2

In a '96? Try swapping out the temperature sending unit (on the engine, probably on the intake manifold. If that doesn't fix the problem... and if it were mine, I'd buy an aftermarket gauge and find a place to mount it. That's much easier than fixing the temperature gauge in an instrument cluster.


2

I would start by researching how to correctly wire the gauges and make them work first, then invest time into building the enclosure. First thing to do is to get a wiring diagram for the bike and stare at it until you comprehend what's going on. This took considerable effort for me, and unfamiliar diagrams made by different publishers still throw me for a ...


2

Disconnect the sender unit and check the continuity with an ohm meter. If if measures open circuit the sender is faulty and should be replaced.


2

Check your radiator overflow to ensure the coolant is where it should be (between the high and low marks). As long as it's good there, you should be just fine to drive it to the dealer. Ensure you start from a cold car and drive immediately. I would bet there is not going to be an issue anyway, but by driving there directly with as little stop/go as ...


2

I would think your issue would be the sensor (aka: sending unit). The temp sensor works on a resistance scale. The hotter it gets, the more resistance is given in the circuit (or maybe it's the other way around ... don't remember, but you get the idea), which relates to the gauge what to show on your dash (newer vehicles will take an output from the computer ...


2

The key to understanding this system is that the signal to the gauge unit comes from the PCM not the temp sensor. Testing is done at the connector at the PCM. Disconnect the “C” connector. Ground the C24 wire Y/G, turn the power on, Leave the ground connected for no more than 30 seconds. The gauge should move to Hot. If it does the gauge and wiring is ...


2

For what it's worth, there is a way to access the instantaneous fuel flow rate inside the secret menu on this model. I know this is not exactly what you're after but this parameter has a very fast refresh rate, and to obtain the l/100 km reading it you simply have to divide the value by vehicle speed and adjust for units if needed. With the key in the "off" ...


2

Certainly the issue would probably have to do with the last change made to the system. I'm sure this doesn't escape you. You will need to test for parasitic drain if you want to nail the issue down. If you are unfamiliar with using a multimeter, here is a general howto on it's use and various functions. Multimeter - Basic Functionality and Howto Here is ...


1

The float lever in your fuel sending unit may have a built up residue on it preventing the float from rising and falling properly. I believe your vehicle has an internal fuel sending unit within the fuel tank. and I believe that your access point for this fuel sending unit is from within the vehicle under the rear seat. This float lever on your fuel pump ...


1

If you are going back to the same source for the sensor, it could be there was a bad production run of the sensor: it could be a manufacturing defect. Try a different source for the sensor and see if it doesn't cure the problem. I agree this is a really strange issue. I have never seen where a single sensor would fail repeatedly. IMHO, it still boils down ...


1

An OBDII display is your best bet. There are lots available similar to this.


1

I think this diagram will help. This is for a Pantera, but it is a Veglia gauge. Don't pay any attention to the colors they mention, but everything else should be golden for you.


1

Engine coolant temperature gauges are not "linear". It is quite common to see gauges which indicate the same temperature level for the operating temperature range that is deemed "normal". Having said that, you need to understand what the normal operating temperature range is for your vehicle in order to understand if the readout corresponds to normal or ...


1

Yes, your alternator is the culprit as the engine is running on battery power. Before you purchase a new one, though, take it to your local Autozone, Pepboys, Checker, or the like and have them test it. They will do it for free. I take it since you didn't say the steering became hard, that the serpentine belt is still running correctly. If it was difficult ...



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