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20

Fuses do not need to be replaced unless they have blown, so it's not a regular maintenance thing. In terms of checking them, depending on your vehicle, many only require a visual check to see if the metal is present or missing. If you do have fuses where their status is not obvious, a good multimeter is only a few dollars (probably cheaper than replacing ...


15

Instead of Ohms checks of fuses I check for voltage with power on. Set your voltmeter to DC volts with the negative lead on the battery negative connector. With the positive lead test both sides of the fuse. If good it will read battery voltage on both sides. Most fuses have exposed metal tabs on both sides of the actual fuse section for this purpose. On ...


10

As a general maintenance practice or a troubleshooting method without having a particular reasoned approach, no. If it's troubleshooting, testing the fuses on their exposed blade tips is equivalent. That said, replacing the fuses shouldn't create any risks so long as you're replacing them with the appropriate values. It should be pointed out that fuses ...


9

The fuse connection legs are through bolted on many of these higher amp rated fuses. To find out remove the black plastic cover below the fuses. If you find small nuts then they are the bolted in type. BTW if the fuse links under the clear plastic windows look OK then they do not need to be replaced.


9

It wouldn't be the fuse which is causing the power drain, but the circuit the fuse is there to protect. (This is the reason why the copied area you have posted has 5 "Not Helpful" votes against it.) The fuse is only a conduit. It transmits electricity. When the circuit transmits too much electricity, the fuse heats up, then "pops", not allowing anymore ...


8

As I understand it, there was a fundamental redesign in the cars from around 2002 onwards. Unfortunately that doesn't help you but I wonder if it is possible to retrofit the later model fuse box. Thank you for the picture, this has cleared things up. The fuse that has melted in your unit is S177 which is wired to the alternator. Apparently as the cable ...


8

Traced this problem to a fuse under the dashboard, located in the middle horizontal row right most fuse. Turns out this fuse is the indicator fuse and when this fuse is blown the indicators won't work but the hazard lights still work. This was the solution in my specific instance but there are two other possible faults which could be to blame for indicators ...


7

Replace them all? No. As others have mentioned, they're either working or they're not. Test them with a multimeter or fuse tester. Be sure to look for "fusible links" in the wiring on a newer car, not all fuses are in the fuse box anymore for some unfathomable reason... Take them all out, one at a time, and clean them? I've had that help on some ...


6

There are three fuses for the seat heater system 1) Passenger fuse box: Fuse 20, 7.5 amp. Supplies Seat heater control unit. 2) Passenger fuse box: Fuse 5, 15 amp. Supplies relay power pin. 3) Driver side fuse box: Fuse 26, 7.5 amp. Supplies to relay control coil. Some have power key off, some do not.


6

If you can get to both sides of the fuse, see if you have power on each side. If you want to make sure, remove the battery terminal, and use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance between the battery terminal and the other side of the fuse. Should be zero or close to it. If so, it is good. With this type of fuse, when it blows, there is usually a large gap ...


6

If the fuse is blowing as soon as you perform an action it's a short to ground. Multimeter won't do much good in this situation. It'll come down to wiring diagrams and visual inspection of the harness and connectors on the circuit. Unless you have a fancy tool that will find the short for you. It looks like fuse 21 powers a bunch of stuff, but since the ...


5

The parking lamp/headlight switch applies power or ground so the circuit would be open if you were testing with the switch off. Same with the turn signals. The tail lights are on separate circuits. They don't share a ground. Does the car have an aftermarket trailer harness? If not your going to have to remove panels and visually inspect the harness for ...


5

They are typically on the same fuse. Charging outlet should be listed as a cigarette lighter.


5

It could be a blown fuse as you suggest. It could also be that the motor isn't receiving current due to a break in the wiring. The multimeter should come in handy to verify this - check to confirm that a voltage drop registers across the pump motor terminals when the wiper stalk is engaged. It may also be that the motor in the pump has gone bad - check for ...


5

Replace the wire between the alternator and the fuse box. It's called the alternator harness, but I haven't found it for sale online. It is just a simple (large) wire with two ring connectors crimped on the ends. It tends to get a break in the wire near the fuse box that then arcs and overheats; this is not a problem with a short otherwise the fuse ...


4

I had to deal with this problem some years ago on a VW. What I noticed is that the fusible link ran slack, causing the connection to arc and as a result burnt out the plastic housing below. I couldn't get a fuse box so I by passed the burnt area, had a link fabricated and secured it with a bolt and nut.


4

I found the problem. I purchased breakdown cover and called the AA out on Sunday afternoon. They were very fast and the guy was incredibly helpful. He said that a fuse had blown, and checked the fuses. He then found a blown fuse and replaced it for another one, but as soon as it touched it instantly blew again. So he looked up on his computer to see which ...


4

You mention, "no draining electrics," can you say more about how you determined this? It's important because "a self-draining battery" requires something that is causing a load on the battery – especially since you have a relatively new battery. On newer cars, there is a risk that disconnecting the battery may cause problems with your radio or other on-...


3

From what I understand and how I've seen it used. If the ignition is off it uses the residual heat from the engine to warm the car. In order to validate my claim, turn your car off and hit the button. You may need to try it with the key in it. Interested if I'm correct. Please follow up. :-)


3

You could try unplugging each lock switch one at a time(or all at once) and test to see if a switch is shorting. If the car has an aftermarket security system you could try removing it from the door lock system. The wire loom that run into the doors can also be suspect. You should probably have a locksmith look at your key and lock cylinder so that you ...


3

Cars commonly multiplex their electrical systems. This means that multiple things are fed from the same fuse. The best way to identify what is on the fuse is to check the wiring diagrams. Once all the possible sources from the fuse have been identified the fault can be systematically narrowed down. First look at components that come on and off, this is the ...


3

If it was me, I'd wire the live supply to the multimedia system to the switched live (ie the 12V when the key is on) and not always live (direct to the battery) That is a simple fix. It does seem a bit strange that the current draw from the multimedia system is so high when off, though, so you may want to check the system and see if it is behaving ...


3

Sounds like a bad ignition switch for the following reasons: It could be an incomplete starter motor circuit, but this will not explain why the dashboard lights are not turning on, which indicates that the ignition switch is not going into the 'On' position. Independent of the starter motor, the fuel pump relay should also "click" when the key in the ...


3

I have a 2005 Golf MKIV and it did this also. Lost a/c, fans, overheated. The B+ wire from the alternator to the battery appears to be too small a gauge. I went to a larger gauge wire and replaced the fuse block on top of the battery. It also appears that the contacts for the three green fuses are not to tight fitting. My wife's a/c went out again last week. ...


3

The thirty amp fuse is your main fuse To ensure we are speaking using the same nomenclature, K1 is referring to model year 2001 in my verbiage. This 30 amp fuse supplies all the power to your fuse block with various 5, 10 and 20 amp fuses populated. I have quite a few hours on this bike and have seen a scenario that you are describing. Here are some ...


3

I found manual here. The fuse box information is on pages 5.18 and 5.19, if you download the PDF: So it looks like it depends on whether your Scenic is a UK? model (steering wheel on the right) or a rest-of-Europe? model (steering wheel on the left). For right-side steering wheel, the fuse box is in the left-hand side of the glove compartment. For left-...


3

So beneath that fuse is a wiring terminal. It's obvious that your terminal got pushed in so far that the fuse spades no longer touch anything. The good news is that everything is in there. The bad news is you will have to dissemble everything and reseat the wiring terminals on the inner surface of that fuse box cover. That could be very ugly depending on ...


3

What can drain your battery is Alarm system, Radio (memory), Remote control key (radio signal receiver), ECU, Clock... Can't imagine anything else. Even if you have all of this, they shouldn't drain a battery in one week. Only thing you can do is to get a Ampere Meter and stick it in that faulty fuse to see what it drains. The fuse can not drain anything, ...


2

Do you hear a click of the brake lock disengagement from the steering column when you depress the brake pedal, with the key in, engine on? If you don't, it could be either faulty wiring to the disengagement solenoid, or the solenoid itself failed (something rather rare, but I have fixed before). Depending on your comfort level, you could: Check the brake ...


2

As Zaid said, start with crasic's excellent answer in: How do you test analogue electrical circuits? . For your situation specifically, I would introduce a small voltage between the fuse holder of the fuse that is blowing, and ground. Use a continuity noise generator or a light bulb so you can hear or see your progress. Then, get into that bundle of wires ...



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