Hot answers tagged

8

To track down and troubleshoot electrical issues, you will almost certainly need a multimeter (also known as a Volt-Ohm meter) - digital ones are best, like the one illustrated below (from Wikipedia) You can get cheap ones, which are fine for most automotive stuff, or much more expensive ones with all sorts of clever features. The two most useful things ...


7

Tools Digital Multimiter Voltage, Resistance, continuity settings Automotive specific DMM's are typically the same device but may have a few extra features (Duty Cycle, RPM) CAUTION: Certain modes on the multimeter can cause damage to the device or your car if improperly hooked up. Never connect the DMM to a circuit in parallel when it is on the ampere ...


6

As I understand it, there was a fundamental redesign in the cars from around 2002 onwards. Unfortunately that doesn't help you but I wonder if it is possible to retrofit the later model fuse box. Thank you for the picture, this has cleared things up. The fuse that has melted in your unit is S177 which is wired to the alternator. Apparently as the cable ...


5

It could be a blown fuse as you suggest. It could also be that the motor isn't receiving current due to a break in the wiring. The multimeter should come in handy to verify this - check to confirm that a voltage drop registers across the pump motor terminals when the wiper stalk is engaged. It may also be that the motor in the pump has gone bad - check for ...


5

It sounds to me like a dead battery. Depending on how accurate your voltmeter is, what you see as 12V may be 11.9V or lower. To give you an idea, an open circuit battery terminal voltage of 11.7V indicates a completely uncharged battery. What you are describing happened to me once with a Volvo car, due to a faulty switch in the glove-box; the glove-box ...


5

Its fairly common for these to burn out sockets for the bulbs, and even often on both sides at the same time. The socket can be removed asa separate piece, and it is fairly likely melted and/or burned


5

They are typically on the same fuse. Charging outlet should be listed as a cigarette lighter.


4

If the tail lights were hot during the swap you may have broken the filiments. Bumping a bulb that is on or been on recently can cause the filiments to fail. Remove the bulbs hold them up to a light and see if the filimant is intact.


4

Replace the wire between the alternator and the fuse box. It's called the alternator harness, but I haven't found it for sale online. It is just a simple (large) wire with two ring connectors crimped on the ends. It tends to get a break in the wire near the fuse box that then arcs and overheats; this is not a problem with a short otherwise the fuse ...


4

The parking lamp/headlight switch applies power or ground so the circuit would be open if you were testing with the switch off. Same with the turn signals. The tail lights are on separate circuits. They don't share a ground. Does the car have an aftermarket trailer harness? If not your going to have to remove panels and visually inspect the harness for ...


3

I had to deal with this problem some years ago on a VW. What I noticed is that the fusible link ran slack, causing the connection to arc and as a result burnt out the plastic housing below. I couldn't get a fuse box so I by passed the burnt area, had a link fabricated and secured it with a bolt and nut.


3

A fuse blowing indicates something is wrong. This could of course be a transient that just requires a fuse replacement or a trip reset, but what if it's something more serious, like a short allowing high current to flow through sensitive components, or to ignite something flammable? Or an indication of failure of an expensive part. A self resetting trip ...


3

Tail light fuse will be third from the left along the top row. As for a concise fuse diagram with full descriptions... Will that do?


3

Sounds like the car charger has a short in it. If you really, really wanted to I supposed you could test for low resistance across the charger plug. Or, perhaps try plugging it into a different car and see if it blows the fuse there. If it was me, I'd try a different device in the car and verify that it's not a loose socket. If it fails that, I'd get the ...


3

I would just add a comment but I don't have enough points I guess. I just wanted to say you are addressing it correctly. The wrong thing to do (but tempting) is to just throw a bigger fuse in there. Avoid that temptation. It's possible that someone (previous owner maybe) has tapped into that circuit since it's an easily available 12V source. Trace the ...


3

Cars commonly multiplex their electrical systems. This means that multiple things are fed from the same fuse. The best way to identify what is on the fuse is to check the wiring diagrams. Once all the possible sources from the fuse have been identified the fault can be systematically narrowed down. First look at components that come on and off, this is the ...


3

From what I understand and how I've seen it used. If the ignition is off it uses the residual heat from the engine to warm the car. In order to validate my claim, turn your car off and hit the button. You may need to try it with the key in it. Interested if I'm correct. Please follow up. :-)


2

You should also check the battery connections. Make sure they are clean and secure.


2

That just means that particular circuit is an always on circuit and not switched by the ignition. When you reconnect the battery lead the computer is probably doing a power on test and as such some relays are being activated such as testing the fan etc.


2

It was the bulbs. I have read of the same phenomenon on other sites -- both low beams go at the same time. My theory is that either there is something about the electrical system that causes the second bulb to go once the first is gone, or... One headlight goes out but you don't notice because you still have one that works. The second one goes and you ...


2

Do you hear a click of the brake lock disengagement from the steering column when you depress the brake pedal, with the key in, engine on? If you don't, it could be either faulty wiring to the disengagement solenoid, or the solenoid itself failed (something rather rare, but I have fixed before). Depending on your comfort level, you could: Check the brake ...


2

As Zaid said, start with crasic's excellent answer in: How do you test analogue electrical circuits? . For your situation specifically, I would introduce a small voltage between the fuse holder of the fuse that is blowing, and ground. Use a continuity noise generator or a light bulb so you can hear or see your progress. Then, get into that bundle of wires ...


2

I'd like to add to Nick's answer and mention a Circuit Tester if you need to simply test the circuit for power.


2

Unfortunately, simply unplugging a fuse isn't going to stop a determined thief, as they often tow cars away rather than going to the noise and effort of trying to start them... I'd suggest some kind of physical lock, either on the steering wheel, gear lever/handbrake, or similar - they often act as a visual deterrent to casual thieves as well, who will go ...


2

Shorts in this system are almost always in the rear of the vehicle. Remove all the brake bulbs, including the center light and inspect the sockets. Carefully inspect anywhere the wires move, like at the trunk lid hinge. Next look for any added trailer wiring connectors, if any disconnect them. After each part is disconnected retest. A short finder tool saves ...


2

I would get some insulated crimp butt connectors and a good quality crimp tool to ensure you get a good connection. Ensure you use wire thick enough to match the existing wire. Like these - http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/crimp-butt-splice-terminals/0534648/ and a tool similar to this - http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/cable-crimpers/4992313/ If you ...


2

If it was me, I'd wire the live supply to the multimedia system to the switched live (ie the 12V when the key is on) and not always live (direct to the battery) That is a simple fix. It does seem a bit strange that the current draw from the multimedia system is so high when off, though, so you may want to check the system and see if it is behaving ...


1

It would help to know what type of car it is but on a petrol vehicle, a quick and easy solution is to remove the king lead from the coil (it's the one that runs to the centre of the distributer cap). No coil lead means no spark which on a petrol car means it won't start. Unfortunately this won't work on a Diesel as these don't rely on spark plugs.


1

This a warning for the engines immobiliser. Re-programme the keys: With a key switch the ignition on, insert key to be programmed into the drivers door and manually lock the vehicle, press the lock button once, wait a couple of seconds and press the lock button once again. The vehicles horn should beep to let you know the key has been programmed. Repeat for ...


1

I'm thinking, from your description, that the problem is the blinker relay, not a fuse. The lights themselves should go through the tail lamp fuse. The relay is what gives the characteristic ticking sound. The emergency flashers usually run off of a separate blinker relay, but may be the same thing. If so, you can use it to test between the two. These relays ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible