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1

I used the 2-part putty stick to repair the leaking tank on my 1968 Firebird, while it was actively leaking. I backed into a parking stop and bumped the tank, when it shifted a bit it caused pinholes where the support strap was contacting the tank. I was young and broke, so I never had a chance to replace the tank. The putty repair lasted 1 1/2 years until I ...


1

If you've had an accident of some kind there could be damage anywhere on the tank, and that damage might not be apparent. There could be cracks or distortion which weaken it and later cause a catastrophic failure. So to be sure you have a complete repair you would need to get it out of the car so all the damage could be found in the first place. Also, you'd ...


1

I wouldn't repair a gas tank. If the repair fails, it's going to be leaking gas, and I don't want to be sitting too near the tank when that happens. $2,000 sounds very expensive to supply and install a gas tank. Get several quotes from other mechanics, including a local dealer.


5

Long story short, yes it is an option. Whether or not it's a good one is another discussion. Good News: finding a replacement gas tank and having a competent mechanic replace it shouldn't cost anywhere near $2000. Especially if you find the gas tank yourself. I'd be curious to know how your mechanic intends to fix your gas tank and add up his services to a ...


5

It sounds like you have a motorcycle with a carburetor with gravity fed fuel line. (i.e. Without a fuel pump of any sort). In those conditions I can see that there is a higher fuel pressure at the inlet to the carburetor when the fuel tank is full. It's possible that when the tank is low the pressure is barely enough to meet fuel demand. With that said, ...


5

I worked at a shop that repaired fuel tanks and this is what we did. No cutting corners, each step depends on the last. The shop had a fancy caustic soda tub and some of the techs would call that an acid bath, but we used this on very few tanks. Mostly small, well constructed, steel motorcycle tanks. This is what we did for the other tanks that were not ...


2

I'm not sure if these are the correct items, but you could find/make some kind of insert to hold the nozzle in place? I supposed you could also cut the filler neck from a car in the scrap yard and adapt it to your truck, but I imagine you don't want to stray too far from the OEM setup (or if it is even legal to do so).


1

I think we can simply refer to Newton's first law of motion in Physics to answer this question in the most simplest way. Newton's First Law of Motion: I. Every object in a state of uniform motion tends to remain in that state of motion unless an external force is applied to it. This we recognize as essentially Galileo's concept of inertia, and this is ...


0

I would argue driving in stop and go traffic uses less fuel than driving at freeway speeds. Consider the following scenario using typical highway and stop-and-go speeds, and realistic MPG at those speeds. You can see the car burns fuel at a quicker rate on the highway than in stop-and-go traffic.


1

One reason is that fossil fuel engines are tuned to run most efficiently around 50-60mph, so any other speed will not deliver as much torque for the fuel being burned - that's why cruising speed is where it is. Another, which I will focus on, is that regardless of what speed you travel at, every time you brake, you waste energy. Here's what it looks like if ...


2

To cut it very simple: acceleration costs energy. Braking does not win you any energy (in your average car at least). Hence, if scenario 1 involves accelerating and braking, and scenario 2 involves a steady cruise at constant speed, then scenario 1 will cost more energy (fuel), simply because you spend the fuel for acceleration. It's not the braking that is ...


2

Any engine can not have 100% efficiency; there are always energy losses. When cruising on highway you generally use the top gear and many cars are tuned to have peak efficiency there. In that case your energy losses are due to aerodynamic drag, tire rolling and engine and transmission friction. Note that first two ways are proportional to squared veocity, ...


1

Simple answer: fuel burn at cruising (at a steady 55 mph) is proportional to the friction (aerodynamic \ tire \ mechanical bearings). High transient driving (stop-and-go with conventional friction braking) energy consumption is significantly higher than energy burn due to steady-state friction. Hybrid electric braking is energy conservative and should be ...


3

The most important aspect of the answer to this question is found in Newton's first law of motion: An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. This is the same reason that space shuttle use something like 90% of their fuel on take-off. ...


3

Another way to view this is to visualise throttle opening. When you're cruising, the pedal is held down to some position more than idle, but less than maximum When you're taking off and accelerating, the pedal is pressed down further, which opens the butterfly valve allowing more fuel/air mixture into the engine. Hence more fuel is used to accelerate ...


16

Every time you brake, the energy is wasted. Brakes convert mechanical energy of a moving car into heat via friction (they heat up). This is where the energy is ultimately "lost". Then, when the traffic moves forward a bit, you of course need to accelerate - and this is where you actually use gas from your tank to put this energy into getting your car to move....


22

If you think about what the car is doing in both cases you'll see why you burn more fuel when accelerating. General theory F = mA (Force is equal to mass times acceleration), and in this case the force is applied by the engine. The more force, the more fuel is burned. Acceleration In stop and go traffic, you are making frequent stops, and accelerating ...


8

Your engine is always burning gas when the car is running. When you're stationary, you are burning gas to keep your engine running, without actually moving the car, so you're actual miles per gallon (MPG) at that moment is 0. When you begin to accelerate, you are using more gas than when the car was idling, but then you have to press the brakes, ...


0

Following up with the resolution: I was right about the diagnosis. The rubber hose joining the filler neck to the fuel tank was deteriorated and cracked. The same was true of the vapor return hose. I was wrong about the cost of repair. I was charged about $375 in labor and $335 in parts, for a total of $810 (USD). The main labor cost was for removing ...


5

You could take the screw out of the center of the knob. Remove it, then put it on only to shut off or turn on the fuel.


0

Could Hydrogen [gas] Be Used as a Fuel [for motor vehicles]? Technically - yes. Practically - no. Fran├žois Isaac de Rivaz ... invented a hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine with electric ignition and described it in a French patent published in 1807 - Wikipedia People continued to invent gas powered vehicles, in the second world war there ...


3

OK, so the problem was that, due to a faulty fuel gauge sender, I over filled the tank. And since the seal around the top of the 'hatch' had partially disintegrated, well this happened: When parked on an angle, fuel was just flowing from the top of the tank :/


1

Yes but it would be impractical for Internal combustion engines. Though hydrogen has a very high energy density per kg, producing it, compressing it and storing it just to lose 70% of it's potential energy as heat losses makes little sense. This is why most hydrogen vehicles use fuel cells. Their higher efficiency (up to 60%) combined with the high ...


3

Hydrogen has been used as a fuel in various experiments. The largest-scale experiment I'm aware of is the BMW Hydrogen 7, a 7-series V12 produced from 2005-2007. About 100 were built. This engine could be switched from gasoline to hydrogen. The difference in fuel consumption is largely due to the different energy density with gasoline (petrol) yielding ...


5

Hydrogen is an ideal gas to be used for combustion, as there are no harmful emissions byproducts if the combustion (combination of hydrogen and oxygen) is at the proper ratio. You just make pure water, which is fine. There are several vehicles and several vehicle companies which have explored the concept of pure hydrogen as a combustible fuel. The ...


3

You can use hydrogen gas, yes. The main problem is that it is not easy to make. Most hydrogen (about 95% of all hydrogen used today) is produced by partial oxidation of methane and coal gasification, with some from biomass gasification. A tiny amount is produced by electrolysis of water (but it uses a lot of power to do so) So, yes, you can use anything ...



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