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4

To add a little bit to Paulster2's answer the upper and lower Explosive Limits of Gasoline is 7.6% and 1.4% respectively. This means that a concentration outside of those limits will either be to rich or lean to burn. And since Gasoline's Flash point is -45 °F (-43 °C) it's pretty much always putting off vapors, which would push any air out of the tank. It's ...


3

Fuel filler neck or pipe, it connects to a rubber hose (8) that connects to the tank (1). Hose clamps (9) are used to secure the hose. If it come loose from the tank then you need to tighten the clamps. If the filler neck is coming a loose from the fender area then you need to tighten or replace the fasteners there. It doesn't look like it's sold separately ...


2

I pulled this from the talk side of Wikipedia page on electric fuel pumps, which I think explains it pretty well: I am an auto mechanic who also has a chemistry background. The reason electric, tank- mounted fuel pumps do not cause explosions is that the concentration of fuel vapors is too high to allow an explosive mixture. The volatile (which in this ...


2

Depending on the class/model, there should be somewhere between 1.5-2.1 USG (~6-8 litres) left in the tank when the light comes on. Here is some interesting reading on this very subject. It seems MB has had a lot of problems with their fuel level indicators. Seems the "best defense" against this is to never let it get below a 1/4 tank on the gauge. Either ...


2

Drain the fuel in the tank. Then fill it back up with gas which has stabilizer in it. Once this is accomplished, get the bike started and let it run until fully warmed up. This will ensure all of the old gas has been purged. After this, you should be good until spring.


2

I'd suggest you're right in your diagnosis and, yes, it should be safe to drive on a minimal basis. The only issue you might see is a check engine light due to the tank not being sealed completely. Also, your fuel will absorb more water than it would otherwise, though this will still be only a small amount. Be careful while fueling and get the repair done as ...


1

There are only two ways I can think of to remove the dent. One is to put a certain amount of water in the tank (off the bike, of course), and freeze it. I don't know what that "certain amount" is, though. If you put too much water in it, it will split seams and such, so proceed at your own risk. A second method is to heat the area up with a blow dryer, ...


1

If the fuel is less than about a month old, you're probably still ok with just pouring in a bunch of stabilizer and warming up the bike to get it well mixed. If it's a couple months old, you probably want to follow @Paulster2's advice and drain the tank.


1

I don't know exactly how the pump comes out of the holder, but if you are saying the black tube is the only thing which is really holding it in, just cut it. You'll get a new hose with your new pump. The pump I just looked at had it in the parts kit. Comes with two hose clamps which connect both ends for you. You'll also get a new strainer for the bottom, so ...


1

K.B.S coatings make a 3 step kit to clean blast and reseal tank.Involves tank removal (a compressor aids in one part of process-I used a hair dryer) and is suitable for cars and bikes.



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