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6

It's a gasoline vent tube, serving three purposes. Gasoline vapors can be especially dangerous under pressure (pretty much why it is useful), and as the temperature fluctuates it is safer to relieve the vapor pressure than it is to potentially have it build up. The gasoline vapors should preferably not be ejected onto a potential spark source (battery) or ...


5

Interesting issue IF, the internal tubes have corroded within the tank that would be relatively serious. The interesting piece is, how would they corrode. As far as I know, almost ALL the fuel tanks on modern bikes use copper for this overflow. It runs from the lip above the filler point, down through the tank to a nipple on the underside of the tank (or ...


4

Fuel filler neck or pipe, it connects to a rubber hose (8) that connects to the tank (1). Hose clamps (9) are used to secure the hose. If it come loose from the tank then you need to tighten the clamps. If the filler neck is coming a loose from the fender area then you need to tighten or replace the fasteners there. It doesn't look like it's sold separately ...


3

Its a petrol overflow drain pipe. In case if you fill fuel that overflows it ll be drained through that pipe. it may also have internal connection with a pipe with drains rain water or any water that tries to get into the tank.


3

There are only two ways I can think of to remove the dent. One is to put a certain amount of water in the tank (off the bike, of course), and freeze it. I don't know what that "certain amount" is, though. If you put too much water in it, it will split seams and such, so proceed at your own risk. A second method is to heat the area up with a blow dryer, ...


2

Drain the fuel in the tank. Then fill it back up with gas which has stabilizer in it. Once this is accomplished, get the bike started and let it run until fully warmed up. This will ensure all of the old gas has been purged. After this, you should be good until spring.


2

I'd suggest you're right in your diagnosis and, yes, it should be safe to drive on a minimal basis. The only issue you might see is a check engine light due to the tank not being sealed completely. Also, your fuel will absorb more water than it would otherwise, though this will still be only a small amount. Be careful while fueling and get the repair done as ...


2

I believe you are correct in saying the tubes are inside the tank. What the manufacturers did was ran molded tubing through the tank and it sounds like those tubes in your case have rusted and corroded. What I would suggest in your situation is just plugging the inlet for the overflow by the filler, and the overflow outlet which comes off the tank. You may ...


1

I'd suspect some kind of blockage or restriction in the filler - possibly the hose itself has partially collapsed, or the non-return valve is stuck, stopping the fuel from running down into the tank properly - by the time you got to the second service station, the fuel had worked it's way past the obstruction into the tank, so you could do it again.


1

If the fuel is less than about a month old, you're probably still ok with just pouring in a bunch of stabilizer and warming up the bike to get it well mixed. If it's a couple months old, you probably want to follow @Paulster2's advice and drain the tank.


1

I don't know exactly how the pump comes out of the holder, but if you are saying the black tube is the only thing which is really holding it in, just cut it. You'll get a new hose with your new pump. The pump I just looked at had it in the parts kit. Comes with two hose clamps which connect both ends for you. You'll also get a new strainer for the bottom, so ...


1

i know this problem your evap canister needs to be changed its full saturated with fuel it cant take any more vapors in it which will cause a very rich mixture in you manifold and probably will stall the engine you can test this by unplaging the vacuum tube to the canister and plugging it with a screw or some thing if the engine dosent stall then just change ...


1

All the analog gauges work by sensing varying resistance by a float sensor which eventually results in thermal conversion or Voltage mapping to fuel levels. The accuracy suffers due to non-linearity of these float sensors.The methods mentioned by Nick & Mac are right here; but it gets very tedious if your demands of accuracy are nearly 1% of total volume ...


1

There is another important function of the fuel cap, it helps control flammable vapors. An example would be if you parked a car inside a hot garage baking in the summer sun. There would be an ignition risk from the enclosed place filled with gasoline vapors leaking out of the open gas tank.



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