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6

Yes, running low on fuel can damage your fuel pump, but as IHaveNoIdeaWhatImDoing mentioned in the comments below, modern fuel tanks are sophisticated enough to prevent fuel pump starvation until the tank is almost complete empty. Either way, damage to the pump can occur because fuel acts as a coolant for the electric motor. When there is no more fuel the ...


4

It is because the fuel lubricates and cools the pump. If you leave the tank run dry, the fuel pump will turn dry, which will overheat it and may cause the electric motor to fail or otherwise to reduce its service life. The same principle applies to the water pump when it is electrically driven, like in the Toyota Prius. When burping those kind of systems, ...


4

My theory is you have a stuck float in your carburetor. This is causing the fuel bowl not to fill completely. When you go around the corner, the main jets are without fuel (sucking air) and this kills engine power. Getting the carb rebuilt (or at least looked at) will probably solve the issue. You may also try using a plastic handled screwdriver and using ...


4

The gas gauge is just an indicator and each vehicle is going to be different. I know the older Datsun Z cars had two gas gauges, one was the main one which showed the volume of gas down to 1/4 tank, while the secondary one showed from 1/4 down to empty. The secondary gas gauge was very accurate to give the driver a true indication of how much fuel was in the ...


2

Kind of a long shot, but I had this problem with an old Nova, turning right. That was due to loose screws in the carb. It might have been the mounts to the intake manifold; but, my vague memory is of tightening screws on the topside. It was a long time ago.


1

The 97 Mercury Tracer doesn't use a Fuel Rail Pressure sensor and any reading you're getting from your OBD2 application is false. If you believe that the fuel pressure is low, hook up a fuel pressure gauge and verify before replacing anything. Refer to Brian Knoblauch's answer for potential causes.


1

You could use a float from a motorcycle You can get these used from various motorcycles for very cheap. From there you can use a propane torch to unweld them from their hangar and braze them onto your float arm. The fuel will never degrade one and there are plenty of them around for a very low cost.


1

I've successfully used ping-pong balls in the past, on gasoline and diesel vehicles.


1

Cork will be porous so probably not a wise choice. If you have a rare car and can't find an appropriate scrap vehicle (which would be my first choice) then a ping pong ball firmly secured to the sender are will be very effective.


1

You probably allready thought of this but have you concidered getting one from a scrapped car? i use parts from the car dump all the time and i rarely have issues. Sometimes you might even get it for free concidering the guys working at the scrapyard are usually nice guys :)



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