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10

There are two possible explanations: If the fuel cap does not form a good enough seal, the fuel injection system may experience problems with drawing fuel from the tank. On newer cars many of them have a fuel cap sensor to detect if the cap is not screwed in. This is related to emissions, although i am uncertain how. I know when I get my yearly emissions ...


9

Look up in your owner's manual how capacity your fuel tank has. Next time you fuel up, take note of the difference. In my car it's roughly 2 gallons (7.5 liters). However, realize that modern cars use fuel as a coolant for the fuel pump and running the tank dry often may damage the fuel pump over time.


8

Despite any opinions of safety it seems that gas tanks are manufactured to not accept more than 95% of their total volume because of regulations. Here is a quote from the US Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carry Safety Administration Regulation 393.67 Subpart E. (12) Overfill restriction. A liquid fuel tank manufactured on or after January 1, ...


8

It might cause issues with the evaporative emissions controls as the tank is currently permanently vented to the atmosphere and that can trigger a check engine light. In general it shouldn't be affecting the fuel mileage, though. The other concern is that you'll probably end up clogging the various fuel filters sooner because the lack of fuel cap means all ...


7

The EPA regulations require that the fuel tank is a sealed system so that no vapors escape. There is an entire system (Evaporative Purge) dedicated to that task. EPA regulations also require that the ECM (Engine Control Module) check they system for leak. When the right conditions are met IE fuel level between 1/3 and 1/2 tank, outside temp 50 - 90 etc. the ...


5

Carry the fuel in an approved container, some local laws require color coded tanks for gasoline, diesel, alcohol etc. If you must carry fuel in the interior of the vehicle use common sense. Don't smoke, and open the windows to avoid a build up of fumes/vapors. If you are using the fuel to power a lawnmower, generator, etc carry as little as possible for the ...


5

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


4

Tire Pressure correct, less rolling resistance. Weight reduction: You, cargo, and extra accessories. The less weight the better the fuel economy. Slow smooth acceleration, no jack rabbit starts Anticipate stops, let off the accelerator early to start slowing down as opposed to keeping the gas on longer and using the brake harder. Eliminate unnecessary ...


4

Motorcycle folks seem to do this a lot, presumably because the gas tank is easy to remove and small enough to manhandle (personhandle?). A Google search produces a lot of results for how to do this, and any of the ways you've heard will probably work well. Here's one detailed list: http://www.mopedarmy.com/wiki/Removing_rust_from_a_gas_tank You have to ...


4

The fuel pump combined with the fuel pressure regulator should take care of any air in the lines. If you don't like the idea of cranking the car continuously until it starts (it would take 3 cycles or so), then turn the key into the "on" position without cranking it. This causes the fuel pump to run, because it primes the fuel system in anticipation of ...


3

There is a kit that contains a new sending unit, float and seal. It retails for 239.20 according to gmpartsdirect.com, they will sell it to you for $124.38. There should be an access panel in the trunk under the mat, so dropping the tank should not be necessary. Expect a shop to bill retail for the part plus an hour of labor. You can probably do this ...


3

Is it possible that the fact that it rained is a coincidence? Could the fuel just be old? If you leave a two-stroke engine sitting too long with mixed fuel/oil in the tank, the mix will lose some of its lubricating properties---sometimes enough that when you try to start the engine it'll run for a moment, then overheat from lack of lubrication and stop. I ...


3

You could absorb it with a rag. Either put continue to hold the tank upside down and stick a rag in the collar around the opening or hold onto a corner and lower the rag into the tank. Leave the cap off and whatever residue that is left after you pull out the rag should evaporate quickly.


3

This can be caused by a number of things, including: Leak in the fuel tank (loose cap) Leaking evaporator canister (plastic housing in engine compartment or under vehicle, also known as charcoal canister) Plugged evaporator canister - there is a tube that is open to the air that can become plugged Malfunctioning purge valve - valve itself is faulty or ...


2

Fuel level senders, when operating normally, produce a resistance value that is directly proportional to the level of fuel in the tank. The value should change smoothly as the float on the arm goes up and down. You should see no sudden jumps in resistance. If a sender is bad, it can show the gas level as full, empty, or sporadically jumpy. Is this the ...


2

In the UK, most petrol (gas) stations sell temporary fuel caps in the appropriate colour, for very little money. They are universal fitting and usually made of plastic, so just press into the hole making a snug fit. In addition to what Tomo suggests though, I would say that it also depends on the vehicle and the fuel that you use. A big problem for ...


2

Sounds like you are talking about a Vespa PX - according to the manual you should get 260Km on a tank. I think this is if you are a very small Italian and travel at a constant 60km/hr. Specs for newer Vespas like the GTS 250 have to conform to EU measurement standards and therefore are more realalistic. Your 150 km is about what I get for mixed riding - I ...


2

Generally speaking (not familiar with that model), it could be due to: Bad fuel pump (fairly rare, fuel pumps are one thing that usually last forever) Clogged fuel filter (has it been changed recently/ever?) Bad fuel pressure regulator (although, they usually fail the opposite way) Leaking fuel injectors (unlikely, would require a pump that's marginal to ...


2

If you perform the repairs yourself the fuel level sensor seems to cost about $100. When the sending unit goes bad the fuel gauge will usually not move at all. It does sound like it could be an issue with the fuel level sensor in your car. Perhaps the float just needs to be adjusted. Maybe someone bent it out of shape when performing a repair. For ...


2

It sounds like you just don't know the characteristics of the output of the fuel level sender in the vehicle--perhaps learning more about that sensor would solve your problem. In terms of an alternate solution that does not use the fuel level sender, if the vehicle is a modern one with electronic fuel injection, then it is possible to determine the ...


1

It is possible to read data from most vehicles' OBD port using a relatively cheap Bluetooth OBD adapter and some client software. Some GPS units have bluetooth, or you could opt for a USB-style OBD plug. This would also allow you to read things like engine load, temperature, rpm, etc. Wikipedia entry OBD Software OBD2 bluetooth adapter


1

I'd also go with calibrating the existing sensor, but I'd do it the other way around to mac. Start with an empty tank and measure the voltage. add a known volume of fuel, measureagain. repeat until the tank is full. This will give you a series of reference points, and obviously the smaller the volume you add each time, the better the resolution of your ...


1

Fundamentally, any engine needs spark, compression and fuel in order to run. If it starts when you put starter fluid directly in the engine, that suggests to me it's not getting fuel. If you've already filtered the water out of the fuel we ought to be able to rule that out. The next check is to make sure fuel is actually getting to the engine. How is it ...


1

When going on long trips or out of the way trips where you know you may not see a gas station for a while, it's worth bringing along extra fuel in a safe and approved container (ie, don't put fuel in a plastic soda bottle and call it a day). However, the safest policy, if you're just going about town, is to keep your eye on the fuel gauge and plan ...


1

Usually what happens is that the spring falls out. I've had this happen in both my cars. I've been able to open them by sticking my keys in the top opening and popping the open lever real quick. Then, retrive keys from ground and fill up car (until a new spring can be purchased and installed). :-) I hope that's all it is, but it's certainly possible ...


1

www.parkers.co.uk gives both fuel tank capacity and manufacturer's quoted mpg for all modern UK-spec cars. Go to reviews, then the "facts and Figures" page for the model in question. Fuel prices, as ManiacZS says, can be found from www.petrolprices.com an IS200SE 4-door saloon has a fuel capacity of 70L and a quoted 29mpg, so at current 136.9ppl* you ...


1

Edmunds.com has the specifications for most vehicles. You didn't give a year so I'll do the current 2012 Audi TT Coupe. Go to http://www.edmunds.com In the search box type "2012 Audi TT" and hit enter Choose the coupe model Under available models choose "View All Features & Specs" under the desired model Go to the Fuel section They list fuel type, ...


1

Very on most cars and extremely on some. Extremely: on my car (2004 Subaru WRX), a loose filler cap will trigger a check engine light and the limp home mode. The engine computer will drop into a mode where it won't allow revs above a low limit and disallows all boost. Suddenly, you're in a 8:1 compression ratio car and aren't able to get out of your own ...


1

I usually get 220km per tank at about a 80kmh average start to stop including 100kmph of 30kms on the freeway everyday. i do 500km a week. run a pipe and porting on an otherwise standad bike PX200. I recon at 60kmph and taking things easy I would get about 300km on the tank but that would be a long ride...



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