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10

Unless you've got an extraordinary circumstance or legitimate reason for using it, don't. Chances are the usage will temporary make the symptoms subside, only to return again later. The way I see it, if your vehicle required it you would find it listed in the recommended maintenance items list in your owner's manual. I think another side to this question ...


10

The "correct" way to clean fuel injectors is to take them out and use some specialised equipment that also allows you to check the injector's spray pattern and flow, which I doubt Firestone will have - usually only FI specialists do have that sort of kit. My guess is that they were trying to sell you some overpriced additive that you can buy at the store ...


6

Most modern diesel engines (ie: engines after mid-80s) require some electricity to run because they are electronically controlled. This is due to computers controlling the fuel charge and monitoring of the engine itself. Without this, the diesel engine has no control. They also require electricity to power the primary fuel pump, to move the fuel from the ...


5

Other possible sources: Vacuum Leak Other Ignition item (Plug Wires, Distributer, etc.) Really poor fuel Air Filter Blocked Exhaust Blockage I would start with the spark plugs. Take them out and see if they can give any indication as to the true problem. See this answer for more info (While you have them out, replace them if you need to). Then start ...


5

I believe that you're talking about the Fuel Vent Canister / EVAP Canister. It is located underneath the vehicle and mounts to the drivers-side frame rail slightly behind the drivers side door area (about the center of the vehicle). Here is a photo for you to compare the part to.


3

I think weighing down the float is definitely the wrong approach - they're fixing the symptom (float not falling) rather than the cause (stiff pivot on the sender). It looks like the sender is easy to remove from the pump, so I'd try and make sure the sender moved freely through its full range of movement before fitting it - this may require lubricating the ...


3

Perform the obvious checks first. Check the air filter and pull the spark plugs and inspect and replace if needed. Take note of their condition. (smell like fuel? / Showing signs of a rich/lean condition? / broken? / etc) Now, lets have a look at the fuel pressure regulator. The fuel pressure regulator is operated by the vacuum line that's attached to ...


3

Either a new fuel cap or you have an air leak somewhere in the system. Best to see what the code is first. The computer checks the pressure of the evaporative emissions system and if it can't hold pressure a code is triggered. Either your cap is bad, a seal is bad/disconnected, etc.


3

I caved (mainly since it is dangerous to keep driving it like it is) and brought it to my local mechanic. He says it is the Idle Air Intake control. I am not going to accept this answer until I can do a test drive. EDIT: Well my mechanic was right on the nose. The replacement worked like a charm.


3

You still haven't answered the question "Why do YOU want to do this?" I can provide you a better answer if I have that information. I have been in the automotive repair business for more that 20 years and have sold and done many induction services. They work, but only if you need them. I used several systems and they all are comparable in results but vary ...


3

Yes. You should use the fuel recommended by your owner's manual. If you don't you are increasing emissions, reducing performance and, in some circumstances, putting your car at risk of avoidable problems. As I said over here: High octane is required for some cars: e.g., a turbocharged car will likely require higher octane to reduce risk of ...


3

There is a kit that contains a new sending unit, float and seal. It retails for 239.20 according to gmpartsdirect.com, they will sell it to you for $124.38. There should be an access panel in the trunk under the mat, so dropping the tank should not be necessary. Expect a shop to bill retail for the part plus an hour of labor. You can probably do this ...


3

Looking at fuelly, the average MPG for a 2002 is 23.3. Only one of those vehicles is called out as being in the GTP trim but it keeps up with the average. Here are the details. 17.5 gallons x 23.3 mpg = 407 mile range. Changing the fuel pump on your GTP looks easier than many vehicles as the tank doesn't need to be dropped: ...


3

One easy way to determine this is to reset the odometer at each fill up. Assuming you fill the tank to the top, you can determine your average mpg by dividing the gallons added by the miles since last fill. Do this a few times when you would expect to be at 1/2 tank. Then to be safe, always fill up no later than 1/4 tank according to the known tank size.


3

This hose is a low pressure one. Your PD type engine only has high pressures inside the valve cover. There is a low-pressure lift pump in the tank, however, which might make a little spritz of a leak when you first remove the hose. You can depressurize the 'low pressure' side of the system by opening the water separator on the bottom of the fuel filter (to ...


3

I recommend to everyone I know to run your generator or other small equipment dry before storage. The main purpose of this is to get all of the ethanol based fuel out of carburetor and fuel bowl. Ethanol has a propensity of gumming things up and can leave a lot of varnish over time. This tends to plug orifices needed for proper fuel metering while running, ...


3

The flap is called a "rollover valve". It is there to help prevent fuel from escaping in the event of a rollover. It also has the added benefit of helping to prevent fuel from being syphoned from your tank. Unless the CEL / MIL / idiot light comes on, just leave it as it is. A number of cars do not have this flap, and work perfectly fine without it.


3

Sta-Bil and Seafoam are made to do do two different things, but there is some overlap. If you are regularly driving or using a vehicle, there is no real need to utilize Sta-Bil. Its purpose is to keep moisture from contaminating the fuel. Moisture is the main enemy of fuel. When you are burning through your fuel on a regular basis, it won't have time to ...


2

Not familiar with Honda ignition systems, but could even be a cracked coil or power transistor case that's allowing moisture in. Acts up until the moisture is cooked out of it.


2

From what I understand, a "fuel induction service" is nothing more than running a chemical cleaning agent through the fuel system. If you are not experiencing any symptoms of clogged injectors, it is unlikely to help. However, it may be marginally useful as a preventative against build-up. Personally, I just add a can of SeaFoam to my gas tank a couple ...


2

Generally speaking (not familiar with that model), it could be due to: Bad fuel pump (fairly rare, fuel pumps are one thing that usually last forever) Clogged fuel filter (has it been changed recently/ever?) Bad fuel pressure regulator (although, they usually fail the opposite way) Leaking fuel injectors (unlikely, would require a pump that's marginal to ...


2

If you're regularly using seafoam, taking care of the engine, and haven't noticed any issues (and also aren't using it for baja or rally), I'd probably skip it. I've done it on every vehicle I own (around 140k on the wife's jetta, 160k on a ranger and 240k on an f150) the first two were starting to have a slight roughness on idle... the f150 I was doing a ...


2

Points would be the first thing I would check. It sounds like the ignition is breaking down i.e. not enough spark getting to the plugs. The next thing to check is the wires. If you have access to an ignition scope or a Kv meter it can make the diagnosis easier. Pulling the plugs and inspecting them can give you more clues see my answer here for help on ...


2

This doesn't sound like fuel injectors at all. My first to suspects are the IAC (Idle Air Control) and the AC compressor. Does the AC work fine otherwise? When not at idle. If so I am leaning more toward the IAC. The computer on the car maintains idle speed by opening and closing a small air passage with a stepper motor. When you turn on the AC and put the ...


2

It sure sounds like a valve is sticking or leaking. There's a remote possibility that your troubles are caused by a clogged catalytic converter or a leaky exhaust. If you can't find any other clues it might be worth it to ask someone at your local bike shop for an opinion before tearing the whole darn thing apart.


2

It sounds like you just don't know the characteristics of the output of the fuel level sender in the vehicle--perhaps learning more about that sensor would solve your problem. In terms of an alternate solution that does not use the fuel level sender, if the vehicle is a modern one with electronic fuel injection, then it is possible to determine the ...


2

I'm going through similar issues with mine, sometimes it is hard to start. On acceleration medium to hard. It cuts all power till I back off and gently feed it on. Then it's fine once over 2000 rpm. I'm suspect of the hex shaped solenoid that pushes the variable cam timing is either sticking and/or not pushing or pulling. The location of it is on the ...


2

If you perform the repairs yourself the fuel level sensor seems to cost about $100. When the sending unit goes bad the fuel gauge will usually not move at all. It does sound like it could be an issue with the fuel level sensor in your car. Perhaps the float just needs to be adjusted. Maybe someone bent it out of shape when performing a repair. For ...


2

Are you able to ask the previous owner for any history that could point you in the direction of the fault? This needs going back to basics. Check that you actually have petrol in the tank, could be anything in there, check for water or diesel or any other contamination. Don't go by the fuel gauge for tank level, it might be mis-reading. Take out the plugs, ...


2

I'm not a mechanic and have minimal knowledge with cars, so I had it towed to a garage. The mechanic there said it was a bad fuel pump. It's a rather expensive replacement with parts running about $250, and labor costing about $250 (they have to remove the gas tank and everything)



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